Skip to main content

Full text of "Bomb"

See other formats


J^^^* 



"^ 












^i^ 




^^^ 



Digitized by the Internet Arcliive 

in 2010 witli funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.arcliive.org/details/bomb1939virg 



t* 



Vm.GIN 




I 




Cf I 



w i/iL ar 




THE 1/IRGIWI 



NINETEEN NUNDDED THIDTV-NINE MADKS 



II 





1. Superintendent's Quarters, built 1847. 

2. Camp and Guard Tree. 

3. Major Gilham's Quarters, huilt 1839. 

4. Barracks, built 1816, enlarged 1839. 

5. Arsenal (hip roof), built 1816. 

6. Captain Williamson's Quarters, built 1843. 

7. Barrack extension, 1847. 

8. Gun Shed, Library above, built 1844. 

9. Mess Hall, built 1S40. 



LIflllT UT[S 
BEfOI^E 1920 

It is interesting to note that at the 
time this picture was taken the dis- 
tance between the posts was just suf- 
ficient to admit the passage of a 
carriage. This distance was increased 
in 1920 and again in 1936. 



V.M.I.'S HUNDIJEDTH (iLONOUS y[AI! 



'^. 



During the Civil War General D. H. 
Hunter took the town of Lexington 
and burned the Institute in 1864, 
leaving it in ruins. At the time this 
picture was taken reconstruction had 
begun, and the corps was quartered in 
cabins like the one to the right of the 
barracks as well as in that portion of 
the barracks which was not injured in 
Hunter's Raid. 



wins Of unm. 
1X60-1367 



Xi^ 



'.< 1 --/ 



w- 





• < •! ri III ( I 



I n n 1 , 
i ii ii i I 



it II I 




-'^ 



13 





^ 


m' 


niiiMi 


■ :^:.^^ 




■ 






*«»-*.. ^- 


•-^■■4 




-H(JS. I??Q 



In this old view of the south side 
of the barracks, one is immediately 
impressed with the absence of the 
parapet and the modern gymna- 
sium. Closer examination will re- 
veal chimneys in every tower and 
an exterior balcony between the 
two main towers. 



L 



asm 
Wall 



This building was dedicated in 
1897. The portion to the left of 
the arch is Jackson Memorial Hall 
as it appeared in that year. The 
cadets were quartered in the bar- 
racks to the right of the arch. By 
1917 the size of the corps neces- 
sitated larger accommodations, and 
the entire structure was converted 
into barracks. 



Replacing the mess hall, which was 
burned in 1905, this building was 
erected on the site of the one which 
served the corps in 1839. It was 
enlarged to some extent in 1918 
and again in 1919. The present 
Crozet Hall replaced it in 1934. 



P^0L0(5UE 



-w. 



9 3 9 



T 



he purpose of this volume is 
to show, pictorially and verhally, 
the progress of the Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute throughout her one 
hundred years of glorious exist- 
ence, and to serve as an alhum of 
the hfe within her wahs today. If 
the reader sees in it a summary of 
impressive progress, and if, in years 
to come, the alumnus may delve 
in it and thrill at the recollection 
of memorahle events, then it wih 
have fulfihed its purpose. 




DEDICATION 

At a time when the Virginia Military Institute is about to enter tier 
second century of service to ttie state and tlie nation, it is only meet tliat tier 
Centennial Class should wish to honor one who has given freely of his strength 
that her glory might he greater. ([ Dur search has heen neither long nor difficdt. 
In Colonel Joseph Button we recognize a man whose devotion for this institu- 
tion and whose faithful efforts in her hehalf are clearly inscribed upon our record. 
flTo him we dedicate this, the Centennial Cdition of the Bomb, with the certain 
knowledge that his accomphshments will inspire us to nobler efforts in behalf 
of V.M.I. (1 To him we offer our highest tribute of regard and affection. 




(OLON[L 

mm mm 



Cnlonel Button has served lanqer nil the Board of 
Visitors than any other appointive meniher in the 
history of V.M.I. First named to the Board in 1910, 
he has played a vital role in each of the dramatic epi- 
sodes which have hrought V.M.I, into the front rant 
of educational institutions. The development of the 
present parade ground and the construction of Memo- 
rial Hall are monuments to his foresight and vigor. 



CONTENTS 

Book One . . . The Institute 
Book TwD .... Tlie Classes 
Book TlirEE . . Tlie Military 
Book Four . . The Athletics 
Book Five . . The Activities 




] W [ INSTITUTE 



p M l l ll l l i l il . l lJ gasa 





t 







MAJOR-GENERAL FRANCIS H. SMITH 

1840-1889 



Born October 18, 1812, son of Francis H. Smith, 
merchant of Norfolk. Commissioned Second Lieu- 
tenant, First Artillery, November 30, 1833. After 
his graduation from the United States Military 
Academy in July, he was on garrison duty for a 
year, then taught geography, history, and ethics at 
the Academy for a year. In 1834 he married Sarah 
Henderson; they had seven children. Resigning his 
commission in 1836 to accept the professorship of 
mathematics at Fiampden-Sydney College in Virginia, 
in June, 1839, he became principal professor and 
after 1840 Superintendent of the newly organized 
Virginia Military Institute, to the service of which 
he devoted the remainder of his life. After 50 years 
as superintendent, as a builder and rebuilder of 
V. M. I., Ceneral Smith retired, December 31, 188?. 
He died in Lexington, March 21, 1890. 



ACADEMIC BUILDING, 1900 



JACKSON STATUE 




HIS EXCELLENCY JAMES H. PRICE 
Governor of Virginia 




MAJOR-GENERAL CHARLES EVANS KiLBOURNE 
Superintendent 



THE L I B 1^ A ^ y 




BRIGADIER-GENERAL JAMES A. ANDERSON 
Dean of the Faculty 



I L LI AM W. (0 ( K E HALL 



■ a«SS»-^"j Sy !iB G « > 



■■7!_;;*^- -v..«tff5Sf3nr*=^:^:;3s 




MAJOR WITHERS A. BURRES3 
Commandanf 



T W E 



P A ^ A D E T 



K<esii.vo5n3aisr 



N 





( D Z E T HALL 



COLONEL dEOME A. mmwm 



Military Executive 
Officer 




COLONEL WILLIAM COUPEH 



Business Executi> 
Officer 





THE 
< J ""' BOARD OF 

( Ci: VISITORS 

ROBERT W. MASSIE 
President 

Terms Expire July 1 , 1942 

Joseph Button Richmond, Va. 

Lawrence W. H. Peyton Staunton, Va. 

Alexander F. Ryland Richmond, Va. 

James R. Gilliam, Jr Lynchburg, Va. 

James S. Easley .... HaUfax, Va. 

Terms Expire July 1, 1940 

Charles M. Hunter Pounding Mill, Va. 

Jay W. Johns . . Charlottesville, Va. 

Robert W. Massie Lynchburg, Va. 

GoLDSBOROUGH Serpell Norfollc, Va. 

Members of the Board Ex Officio 

S. Gardner Waller Richmond, Va. 

Adjutant General of Virginia 

Sidney B. Hall Richmond, Va. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 



ACADtMK DEPAIiTMENT 



mHimmHm 




GFN. ]. A, ANDERSON 




THE DEPARTMENT OF 
CIVIL ENGINEERING 



Under the able guidance of General Anderson and his large staff '39's 
Civil Engineering men managed to plot their way through two years of 
V. M. I.'s grand old course. Along winding railroad curves, through stu- 
pendous cuts, over amazing fills, across dams and over bridges, the largest 
group of '39ers in any department followed General Anderson, Colonel Marr 
et al to their diplomas. Slave as they would in the afternoon drawing classes 
under Colonel Boykin, the nights before Christmas and Finals found draw- 
ing academy lights burning until breakfast when weary Civil men proudly 
turned in their handiwork. 

As they leave the transits, drawing boards, and labs of V. M. I., the 
Civil Engineers of '39 turn gratefully to the tireless men of the Nichols 
Engineering Building who have taught them that a V. M. I. cadet can 
tackle anything from a gatepost to the Grand Coulee dam as long as he 
has a slide rule in his pocket and four years of tough work in his brain. 




THE DEPARTMENT OF 
MATHEMATICS 



No course is as important to a V. M. I. cadet as mathematics, a fact 
which he soon finds out when he is confronted with six hours of it a week 
during his first year. This year, however, calculus was eliminated from the 
curriculum of the third class liberal arts as a required subject. Many were 
the heads shaken in doubt, and the prediction was that everyone would be 
taking liberal arts in order to escape calculus, but calculus drove no one away 
from the scientific courses, and Colonel Byrne and Colonel Mayo are still 
demonstrating the properties of differentiation and integration to almost as 
many as before. Although teaching some of the most difficult courses in 
V. M. I.'s curriculum, the staff of the math department has always shown 
itself to be one of the most patient and understanding in helping the 
strugglers. 

From this department have come some of the most cogently phrased ob- 
servations on academic ability to be found at V. M. I., and the old alumnus 
may not remember how to integrate, but he can't forget that it is comparable 
to "getting money from home." 




Capt. Vose 
Col. Bvrne 



Maj. Clari 
Col. Ma 





COL. FRANCIS MALLORV 




THE DEPARTMENT OF 
PHYSICS 



Not a cadet is graduated from V. M. I. who has not delved into the 
mysteries of physics and its amazing laws under the able guidance of Colonel 
Mallory or one of his assistants. Colonel Mallory himself can boast of hav- 
ing pounded the irrefutable laws of physics into the heads of cadets and of 
having initiated their sons into the same mysteries years later. Year after 
year this department ably introduces cadets to the most fundamental course 
in a scientific or a liberal education and later carries its scientists on to inten- 
sive work that makes them proud to match their knowledge of physics with 
anyone. 

To Colonel Mallory, Colonel Hefiin, and Major Weaver came Captain 
I. G. Foster, who not only showed himself well qualified to uphold the teach- 
ing tradition of the department but also proved himself to be a godsend to 
cadets with calculus behind them. With the traditions of Maury and Brooke 
behind them, the Physics Department, which is as old as V. M. I., carries on. 




THE DEPARTMENT OF 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



It is only the cadet with limitless fortitude and determination who at- 
tempts a degree in electrical engineering. The also-rans are convinced dur- 
ing their third class year that E. E. is somebody else's job. A man has to 
be good to get by E. E., a fact that can be attested by Col. Stewart W. An- 
derson, the department's capable head and moving spirit. F. C. P.'s are often 
few and far between, but the fact remains that at graduation the electrical 
department invariably produces some of our country's finest engineers. To 
the layman, the electrical department resembles a conglomeration of ohms, 
wires, alternators, ammeters, resistances, and various other peculiar pedimenta. 
To the second classman, who has short-circuited his way through d. c, the 
course represents a three-phase chimera which exhibits a marked tendency to 
bring numerous zips. As a graduate, however, the cadet realizes what 
fine training and what excellent instruction he has received, and is proud to 
be a graduate of our noted Electrical Engineering Department. 




COL. STEWART W. A.NDEKSO.S 





■ .^.OC.---^- ■ ■»»».~^^-it.i 




COL. W. O S\\ AN 




THE DEPARTMENT OF 
CHEMISTRY 



The Chemistry Department has had a difficult task this year undergoing 
the ordeal of pounding elementary chemistry into the unreceptive skulls of 
both third and fourth classmen. Somehow these young gentlemen can't see 
why H O NaCl doesn't give hydrochloric acid, and it is only through the 
inherent genius of our chemistry professors, ably led by Col. Swann, the 
department head, that these test tube babies ever emerge. Nor is the Chem- 
istry Department one to relax in providing studious "enjoyment" for its stu- 
dents. Obnoxious odors exude unceasingly from the Chemistry Building, and 
gallons of midnight oil are expended in the lab. Cadets adorned with flasks, 
beakers, and crucibles are a mute testimony that something is "brewing" 
in Chem. Lab. Suffice it that, carrying on the high, progressive standards 
established by Col. Pendleton, the Chemistry Department has one of the 
highest ratings in the South. Closely connected with the Chemistry Depart- 
ment are the pre-medical students, who labor amid unknown texts and other 
monstrosities, and with whom Maj. Carroll has done exceptionally fine work. 



Maj. Ritchie 



N Capt. Travis ' 

Col. Young Col. Carroll 



Kelly 

Col. Steii 




THE DEPARTMENT OF 
LIBERAL ARTS 



Although the youngest of the departments and possibly not so renowned 
as some of the others, the Department of Liberal Arts is swiftly coming to 
the fore and establishing a firm place for itself at V. M. I. In the past, it 
has been erroneously thought by some that L. A. was a "crip" course for 
those aesthetic young gentlemen who were not blessed with mathematical or 
test tube minds, and for those who possessed an overpowering desire for the 
"hay" three afternoons a week. Such is not the case. On the contrary, the 
L. A. man probably spends more time on his books than any other, although 
his work is of a less exacting sort. Specifically, the L. A. Department is for 
those who prefer Shakespeare to advanced calculus and history to highways. 
Thus it provides a splendid, comprehensive course for men who feel that a 
literary, intellectual course is more worth while than a more technical training. 
Under the able leadership of Col. Hunley, with the talented help of Col. 
Dixon, Col. Fuller, and Col. Bates, the Liberal Arts Department is now an 
integral part of V. M. L 




r.OL. W, .M. HUNLEY 




Col. Fuller 



Maj. Mont 
Col. Towr 





COL. T. A. E. MOSELEV 




FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
DEPARTMENT 



Merely glance in any Keydet's room and you will undoubtedly find more 
than ample evidence of the Foreign Language Department. Grammars, 
readers, and novels (French, Spanish, or German, take your choice) are in- 
evitably strewn about, to say nothing of the usual well-thumbed dictionaries. 
"So I can tell her that I adore her in every tongue" is the customary Keydet 
excuse for burning the midnight oil and pouring over the intricacies presented 
by his foreign language courses. Yet in reality, we are more likely impelled 
by the desire to acquire a bit of the romance and atmosphere of these far- 
distant places and to share at least in part the wealth of knowledge of our 
well-versed instructors. For in our foreign languages we derive far more than 
a mere desultory knowledge of the language itself. Thanks to the interest 
and capacity of our professors and their broad knowledge derived from per- 
sonal experience, we are able to acquire also something of the cultural history 
of the country, the folklore, the musical and literary achievements. And 
in the travel which we all hope to enjoy in years to come, we shall have 
more than one occasion to thank the Foreign Language Department for their 
patience with us and for the inspiration which they imparted to us. 



Capt. Lipscomb 



Col. Millner 





/Ir 



7 / 



/ 



T H [ (LASSES 




BRIGADIER-GENERAL SCOTT SHIPP 
1890-1907 



IIIMII 
IMflt 

n 





*.-' '*^-.<>j 



Born in Fauquier County, Virginia, August 2, 1839; 
attended Warren Green Academy, Warrenton, Vir- 
ginia, and Fulton College, Fulton, Missouri; member 
of engineering corps in Missouri, 1855-'56; entered 
V. M. I. September, 1856, graduating in 1859 with 
fourth stand in a class of 29, and as Captain of 
Company "D." Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 
V. M. I., 1859-'60; Professor of Latm, 1860-'61; As- 
sistant Adjutant-General, Captain in the Provisional 
Army of Virginia and Major of the Twenty-first 
Virginia Volunteers, 1861; Commandant of Cadets, 
V. M. I., September, 1861-'90; in command of the 
battalion of cadets at the Battle of New Market, 
May 18, 1864; graduated in Law at Washington and 
Lee University while commandant of cadets; Pro- 
fessor of Latin, 1876-'90; Superintendent of V. M. L, 
1890-1907. 



VIRGINIA MOURNING HER DEAD, 1903 



THE TERRACE 



] W [ (LASS Of 



9 



3 



9 



I OFFICERS 

W. A. Irving President 

T. W. Gray Vice-President 

P. W. RiDDLEBERGER Historian 

* 






GRAY 
E37] 



RIDDLEBERGER 




Frederick William Terry Cossette Adams 

"Freddy "Alt^hcbe ' BETHLEHEM, PENNSYLVAN 

Civil Engineering 



Private (4, 3, 2, 1); 
Glee Club (2, 1 ) ; Sec 



Boxing (4); Edicorial Sraff Cadet (3, 2, 1); 
nd Class Show (1); Secretary Glee Club (1). 



One of Fred's chief characteristics is that he's 
hard to wake up once he is asleep. However, in 
this case there exists a compensation in that when 
awake he is intensively alive, capable of feeling 
into a man and touching upon the suitable point. 

Whether in general conversation or in answer to 
practically any question, he can always give the 
definition, synopsis, or an analogous anecdote that 
will bring the conversation into a deeper, finer field. 
Flis scope of knowledge in all subjects has made 
us regard his word with reverence and his delivery 
cannot help but inspire his listeners. 

From the beginning of our associations with 
Fred we could easily see that he came from the best, 
is used to the best, and in the course of the years 
he has made us realize that he will always have 
nothing but the best. We believe that if he main- 
tains his natural disposition, as shown by his way 
of life these four years, the future for him is as- 
sured. 



George Sidney Andrew, Jr. 

"Andy" NORTHFIELD, VeRN' 

Liberal Arts 



Private (4, ll; Wrestling (4); Track (4); Corporal (3) Glee Club 

(3 1): Sergeant (2); Associate Editor. Cadet (2); Editor, Cadel 

(1); Athletic Council (1); O. G.'s Association (1). 

Andy will long be remembered by the cavalry 
brothers for his "Washington Merry-Go-Round" 
in a swinging-door and for his well-earned nick- 
name of "Two-julep." Straight from the plains 
of Kansas came this slim-faced lad to make his 
military debut at the Institute, and, starting from 
scratch, he accumulated a vast host of friends. You 
could not know Andy without liking him for his 
brilliant personality and true friendship. Born a 
Liberal Artist, he practiced his chosen profession 
by very ably editing The Cadet, spreading his opin- 
ions far and wide in the form of IPSO FACTO. 
Of no small value were Andy's athletic contribu- 
tions to dear old "C" Company. George's military 
career had its jumps and spurts, terminating in his 
assuming the rank of "one of the boys." A lover 
of no mean ability, Andy has wooed and won many 
girls, leaving a trail of broken hearts from Te,\as 
to Vermont, each time with the firm belief that 
"this time I've found the real thing." George 
Andrew, with his literary ability, should never 
know the word "down," for his success was sealed 
when he signed up with the L. A. boys. He will 
always be remembered as a fine fellow and a true 
Brother Rat of the Class of '39. 






m 



I 



h 



m 



Charles Castro Arms 



PrcMtdical 



Champs Easti.akf. Fjabc.cx.k 

"pun" "Charlie" SaN FOAIlf.JVXi, CAl.lfOUX* 

I.lfcffal Ar^^ 



Private (4, J. 2, II; BoxinB (4. 3); V. A. S. (2, 1). 

Throughout his four years at V. M. I. "C 
Square" has shown his industriousness in both aca- 
demic and non-academic work. His spare time has 
been divided between the beakers, test tubes, and 
flasks of the lab, and the gloves and mat of the 
gym. His lab experiments were watched by the 
brothers with a cautious eye, for many were not 
classified as orthodox. Taking nothing for granted, 
Charlie always ran additional reactions to substan- 
tiate the words of his instructors. Differing from 
many, he was more in learning than in making 
grades, and pursued his studies with an interest 
and intelligence that put him with the best of them 
when examination time came around. This in- 
quiring attitude coupled with a characteristic thor- 
oughness will bring success in any field that "C 
Square" enters. 

The bugle was a constant source of worry to 
Charlie (causing him many a walk into the coun- 
try) by blowing before Arms was in ranks. He 
always took this with a smile. It is this same 
indomitable spirit that will carry him to success in 
later life. 



Private M. 3. 2, 1); f. A. L, A. (2, I); Alii.Mm .Maruic«. B»K- 
ball 12); Intramural Company Manager (I); Gl« Oub (1); In- 
tramural Council (I ) . 



Charlie is a true Californian, and he doesn't 
mind admitting it. 

He has been "one of the boys" since the advent 
of his career at V. M. I. four long years ago, and 
many have been the times that Charlie has provided 
headaches for the authorities, though never in a 
malicious way. He has walked weary miles along 
penalty tour road, but he must have gotten some- 
thing in return, because he has been a leader in 
intramurals since his Rat year, climaxing his suc- 
cesses with the intramural managership of "A" 
Company for 1938-39. 

Charlie's name has appeared on the honor roll a 
number of times, and although he never made aca- 
demic stars we are convinced of his high intelli- 
gence. 

Topping all of Charlie's activities is his career 
as a socialite. We have learned from very good 
authority that his name is a by-word down Lynch- 
burg and Richmond way. 





James Harold Bailey 

Chemistry 
Field Arlillery 



Phill Blanks Baldwin 

'Phitl" Little Rock, Arkans 

Electrical Engineering 

Field Andlery 



Private (4); Track (4); Academic Stars (3, 2, 1); Orchestra (3), 

2, 1); Corporal 13); Battalion Sergeant Major (2); Rifle Team 

(3, 2, 1); Second Class Show (2); V. A. S. (2, 1); Lieutenant 

(1); Manager, Rifle Team (1). 



Jimmy started his military career at V. M. I. by 
marching the first section during his Rat year. 
From there his rise was steady; corporal, sergeant, 
battahon sergeant major, and second heutenant. 
Academic stars have always accompanied the chev- 
rons on his sleeves, proving both the qualities of a 
"brow" and a military man. In addition to hii 
military and academic success, Jim supplied the 
vocals for the commanders for two years and 
consistently turned in good scores on the rifle team, 
managing this team his first class year. 

In his second class year Bailey joined the test 
tube shakers, leaving forever the section in which 
he was invariably referred to as "Cadet Corporal 
Bailey of Mississippi." Substituting flasks and con- 
densers in the first class years for the test tubes of 
previous years, Jimmy still led the field and led the 
way for the section in lab work. We know that 
Jimmie's record at V. M. I. in all fields is an 
indication of the success we all wish him in later 
life 



te (4); Academic Stars (4, 3, 2, U; Gym Team (4, 3); 
It Eight (3, 2. 1); Corporal (3); First Sergeant (2); Second 
Finance (2); A. I. E. E. (2, 1); Chairman A. I. E. E. (1); 
Glee Club ( 1 ) ; Hop Committee ( 1 ) ; Captain ( 1 ) . 



Friends, chevrons, and femmes are Phill's. Be- 
cause of his sincerity, generosity, and modesty, his 
friends are many. His stripes went only to his 
arm, and, as a result, he has always remained "one 
of the boys." As captain of his company, Phill 
has dealt fairly and squarely with every member 
in it. It was at summer camp that Phill began to 
develop hitherto unsupected romantic qualities. 
"Dropsy," the rambling ruin, almost died from 
overwork. He is putty in the hands of a beautiful 
girl, but fortunately he chooses only the nicest to 
go with. Baldwin comes from Little Rock, his 
Arkansas drawl is charming in his Glee Club bass. 
He was one of the moving spirits of the Little 
Symphony and also of the gym team. Phill was 
chosen president of the A. I. E. E. by his fellow 
civil engineers and has worn stars for three years 
— certain proof of his ability. Baldwin has been 
active in many fields, and, what's more, calmly and 
quietly, without striving or pushing, he has excelled 
in all of them. In Phill is exemplified the ideal all- 
around V. M. I. cadet! 



) 
) 



m 



I! 



h 



m 



Mercer Dean Bari;i ield 



Civil Engineering 



Wii.i.iAM f-RANt.is Barnard, Jr. 

"Ltyjilntny," "li.ini'" NofrfoI.r, VttCtUtA 

Civil EnKinemnit 
I'leld Aililtci; 



Private (4); Boxing (4); IntramuraU (4, 3, 2, 1); Corporal (i|; 
Sergeant (2); Assistant Manager, Wrestling (2); A. S. C. E. 
(2, I); Liemenant (1); Hunt Club (1). 



Private 14, \ ) ; Co.poral IJ); Sergeant (2); A. S. C. E. (2, 1); 
O. G.'s AAUKiation M>. 



Four years as a cadet at V. M. I. have not taken 
away Doc's love for his state nor his familiar "Gulf 
of Mexico" accent. He is one of the better known 
figures of '39 for a combination of reasons. 

When Doc matriculated he decided that the 
cavalry was the branch for him. He made the 
right choice, for during his first class year he has 
been a proud and just wearer of three chevrons, 
all to the undoubted advantage of "C" Company. 
He has been a consistent student in the C. E. 
Department and has come close to academic stars. 
Yet he has found time to patronize the neighbor- 
ing female institutions, seriously, in fact. 

We had hopes of Doc's putting the Institute on 
the map as a boxer, and we regret that the abolish- 
ment of that sport has kept us from watching him 
develop there. 

We don't know just what Doc will do, but it 
is probably safe to say that he will return to his 
beloved native state, Mississippi, in some very 
useful capacity. 



The old saying, "haste makes waste," will never 
apply to this son of ole Virginny. He always 
gets where he's going — after so long a time. That's 
why we call him "Lightning." We named him that 
one day in his third class year, after he pondered 
five minutes over whether he should play an ace 
or a king in a bridge game. 

He may not be a genius, either academically or 
along military lines, but he has a quality we all 
admire — the ability to make friends easily. Ask 
anyone who knows him, and you will find that he 
is one of the best liked boys in barracks. The 
girls like him, too, don't they, Frank? He's every- 
body's friend, in spite of the fact that his ever- 
present jokes are somewhat pointless. Speaking of 
jokes, we like the way he bursts out laughing when 
he sees the point of one two years old. 

Because of your winning personality, Frank, we 
think you'll go far in anything you try, but what- 
ever you do, "take it easy!" 




, ;\ 



■JCU^ .1 ■■-«.. 




Bailey Hurley Barnes 

"B. H." ■•Q. M." BiRMiNt 

Chemistry 

Field Artillery 



Roger Irving Beale, Jr. 

Liberal Arts 
Cayulry 



Private (4): Gym Team (4, 3, 2, 1); Corporal (3); Assistant Stage 

Manager, Second Class Show (3); Q. M. Sergeant (2); Stage 

Manager, Second Class Show (2); V. A. S. (2, 1); Horse Team 

Show ( 1 ) ; Lieutenant ( I ) . 



In September, 1935, there appeared at the doors 
of J. M. Hall a very little man with a very big 
suitcase and a very energetic way about him; in all 
the phases of V. M. I., military, academic, and 
extra-curricular, the Birmingham Special has put 
that same energy to good use and has always ended 
up in the top brackets. 

Informal oratory has always been Bailey's spe- 
cialty, and his chief competitor for honors in this 
line has been Windy Feddeman, who has always 
had a good story to match with Bailey's. Able 
in class, Bailey has achieved distinction in such 
diversified activities as military, gymnastic work, 
horse show team, and Second Class Show, not to 
mention a few extra-curricular trips to Macon and 
the Briar Patch. 

To the biggest man in the littlest package the 
brothers bid a fond farewell, knowing that the 
same abilities that he has shown at V. M. I. will 
carry him to success in the outside world. 



U; Baptist Club (4. 3, 2 
Corporal ( 3 ) ; Sergeant 
(1 ) ; Hunt Club ( 1 ) . 



On one occasion a part of the corps was march- 
ing down a street in Richmond. A young lady 
remarked on the handsomeness of a tall cadet as 
one of the ranks came past her. You need only 
look at the accompanying picture to realize that 
this man could easily have been Rog Beale, and 
that is just who it was. 

But Roger has qualities more intangible which 
those close to him have recognized. Roger figured 
that a library was not just a useless monument, 
and he has used the library to good advantage in 
the pursuit of his liberal arts subjects. 

Rog has climaxed his V. M. I. career by serving 
faithfully and well as a second lieutenant in "A" 
Company. He has also been a capable pinch-hitter 
as adjutant of the first battalion. 

We understand Rog has a business to carry on 
when he leaves the Institute. His interest in his 
fellowmen and sincere desire to make good com- 
bined with the other qualities which we have men- 
tioned equip him to carry on. 



m 



E 



I 



m 



Robert Harold Becker 



Civil hnginwring 
I'irlJ A,lillr,y 



Private (4, 3. 2, 1); Yankee 
ingTeam (2, I); Second Cla: 



Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Polo (3); Jump, 
s Show (2); O. G.'s Association ill. 



Why Bobby ever left Poughkeepsie and Vassar 
for Lexington ancd the "Cemetery" no one has ever 
guesseij. Maybe he decided that gals with brains 
haven't much else to offer. Anyvi'ay, it was a happy 
day in the "hundred years of glory" when he 
signed his name to the little blue card that balmy 
September morning when the class of '39 entered 
upon its "four long years." Bob was the second 
mister to report in September of '35, and since 
then he has kept himself right out in front so far 
as his Brother Rats have been concerned. When- 
ever there was a job to do he was always ready 
and willing. A Brother Rat's woes were always 
his care. Were you ever in the doldrums and 
failed to find Bobby sympathetic? You can bet 
your running pants you didn't! His good humor 
was unshakable, and one always felt better for hav- 
ing been in his company. As a conscientious 
worker Bob was hard to surpass. Perhaps he wasn't 
the 'brow Civil man, but his work was always done. 



John Gii.j.;am Bernard 

"Juhnny" Peir.nbijtn, ViteiiniA 

HIeccrical Bngine^rrjng 

FitlJ AllilUry 

Private (4, 2. 1); Boxing (4J; Atadeuiic Stars (J, 2. 1); Cor- 
poral (31; A. I, E, H. (2. 1); Astiftant Maruget, Foodnll tZi', 
Second Class Finance Committee (2>; Hop Commifce-c (l>; Execu- 
tive Committee, A. I, E. E. (1). 

Every day we hear of a baby being born with 
a silver spoon in his mouth, but seldom indeed is 
one born with a slide rule held in his hand. Johnny 
must have been of this latter type, for he is in- 
disputably the mathematical wizard of V. M. I. 
Early in his third class year he was given the nick- 
name "Phi" in recognition of his prowess in cal- 
culus. He was always willing to lend a helping 
hand in aiding others, not infrequently holding 
coaching classes and giving special instruction to 
the boys who were having a tough time. Coupled 
with his scholastic abilities Johnny has keen judg- 
ment and sound common sense. 

In spite of all his good work in barracks, "Phi" 
has never quite been forgiven for his actions the 
last morning of camp at Fort Hoyle when he 
brought visitors and stood guard at the barracks 
door from First Call until Reveillel 

If the men at the top in science or business 
of the future are to be made up of men with in- 
telligence and common sense, then Johnny will be 
with them. 





Paul Rutherford Bickford 

Hampto: 
Civil Engineering 
field Artillery 



Harman Paul Bigler 



Civil Engineering 
Field Arlillery 



1); Wrestling (4, 2, 1); Corporal (3); 
mpion, B5-lb. Class (3)^ A. S. C. E 
Manager, Baseball (1). 



(4, 3, 2, I); Academic Srars (2, 1); 
Astronomy Club ( I ) . 



A. S. C. E. (2, 1); 



What a weeping of lovely eyes and breaking of 
lonely hearts there will be when Paul Bickford 
graduates from V. M. I. A notorious lady-killer, 
he is famed for his romantic escapades. But this 
Hampton boy has other claims to fame. For ex- 
ample, he has been especially proficient in athletics. 
He was the 135-lb. intramural wrestling champion 
his third class year and was manager of the 1939 
baseball team. "Digs" is also one of the outstand- 
ing personalities of V. M. I. Above all else, he is 
a past master at clever repartee, and barracks has 
a word for his ability to talk himself out of many 
an embarrassing situation. He is one of the best 
liked fellows in school, for he has an appealing 
and friendly personality that one cannot help being 
attracted to. Although he was a corporal, since 
his third class year Bickford has remained one of 
the clean-sleeve boys. In spite of his romantic suc- 
cess, which we all envy, Paul Bickford is doubt- 
lessly a man's man. He is one cadet the whole 
school will miss, for he has contributed much to 
V. M. I. 



On that fateful day in nineteen hundred and 
thirty-five there was a fellow matriculate among us 
not destined for military fame, but who was to 
become one of the best of the brothers. The 
"Gourd" was older than most of us, having worked 
several years after graduating from high school. 
Appropriately titled "Brow," he was never too busy 
to stop and help one of the boys struggling through 
a problem. It can easily be said that section C-1 
owes a lot to the "Big," and if the truth be known, 
some of its members might not have graduated but 
for his aid. The "Gourd's" easy going nature and 
love for trifling has placed him in the center of 
many gay gatherings. 

In spite of his occasional light moods, his aca- 
demic stars, and his one woman romance, his true 
love for the "hay" has remained with him. 

Barracks has known no harder worker, no more 
sincere or better friend than "Big." With such 
characteristics how can he fail? 



m 



I 



I 



m 



Raymond Charles BLAt:KMON 



Private (4, 2 


1); 


Corporal (3); Varsit/ Kifle Te 


Manager "B" 


Co 


npanv, Intramural Rifle Team ( 


C. E. (2, U- 


Me 


Tiber Secret Fifteen (2, 1); Capt 
(1); O. D.'s KoMer (1). 



Ray came from Eufaula, Alabama, and whatever 
the town is it is obviously a breeder of that popular 
type known as the strong, silent man. But con- 
tinuing his attentions to one, Ray has spurned the 
hordes of lovely girls that are traditionally in pur- 
suit of the S. S. M. More activities than girls 
have occupied Ray's mind during his four years at 
V. M. I. 

His calm, unruffled temperament has proved to 
be the necessary characteristic for one of the best 
marksmen in barracks. Active not only in intra- 
murals, where he managed the "B" Company rifle 
team, he also showed his marksmanship to be of 
intercollegiate calibre by firing on the varsity rifle 
team for three years, captaining it his first class 
year. 

"B" Company also chose him for its outstanding 
private by putting him on the O. D.'s roster, and 
many were the "superiors" that the infantrymen 
garnered as a result of Ray's tours. 

Few things have upset Ray's tranquil outlook on 
life; he knows his abilities, sees his opportunities, 
and makes the most of everything that comes his 
way with a firm, unshakable determination to suc- 
ceed. 



Nathan Boi.otin 

SttAfOil, pEMWrLVAWM 
Electrical Knuinefring 
Cayahr 



(4, 3, 2, ll; Yankee Qub (4, ), 2, I); A. I. li. E. 
(2, l); O. G.'s Association (I|. 



At the Start of his second class year Nathan 
took the bit in his teeth and joined the ranks of 
the favored few in the Department of Electrical 
Engineering. 

Never the entertainer of vast military ambition, 
Nathan has been content to flaunt a clean sleeve 
on one of the "grossest" blouses ever seen within 
the sacred portals of V. M. I. From birth "Blotz" 
has had a rabid fear of horseflesh, so — he joined 
the cavalry. From that day forward he has main- 
tained vehemently that mankind was created to 
keep its feet, and feet alone, on the ground. 

Nathan has probably done more research in the 
literary field than any of his Brother Rats. His 
library of "Amazing Stories" and "Wild West 
Tales" can hardly account for the numerous times 
Bclotin, N., has appeared upon the monthlv honor 
roll. 

Quiet, unassuming, and blessed with a spirit of 
generosity found in but few men, Nathan can rest 
assured of his position in the hearts of his friends. 





William Anderson Bond 



Liberal Arts 
Field ArtilUry 



Lewis Booker, Jr. 

New Castle. Di 
Liberal Arts 
Field ArnlUry 



• (4); Football (4); Texas Club (4, 3, 2. 1); Corporal (3); 
ittalion Football (3, 2, 1); First Sergeant (2); Second Class 
e Committee (2); Business StaS. The Cadet (2); Business 
Bomb (2); Battalion Commander (1); President, Texas Club 
iusiness Manager. Bomb (1); President, Presbyterian Club III; 
Court ID; General Committee (1); Treasurer, Hop Com- 
mittee (1). 



Texas put her best foot forward when she sent 
Bucking Bill Bond to represent her at V. M. I. 
The fact that Bill could juggle figures as well as a 
lariat earned him the treasurership of the Second 
Class Finance Committee, the Hop Committee, and 
the respect of every cadet in school. Chevrons 
were showered down upon him and Bill took them 
as easily as he did the rest of his activities. 

A never-ruffled good temper has been one of 
Bill's chief charactertistics, and in four years none 
of the brothers has ever seen Bill without a friendly 
smile and the omnipresent cigar. The presidency 
of the Texas Club could not have gone to anyone 
but Bill. 

To one of its ablest and finest men "39 bids 
good-bye with difficulty, knowing that wherever 
you are. Bill, and whatever you are doing, we will 
be proud to claim you as a V. M. I. man, a Brother 
Rat, and a fine friend. 



14); Corporal (3); Episcopal Vestry (3, 
Sergeant (2), Cap'ain (11. 



When four years ago Lewis came here from 
Delaware, following in the chevron-studded wake 
of his older brother, he must have keenly felt the 
obligation of succeeding in a military way, for 
today we find the chevrons of "E"' Company's cap- 
taincy gracing his sleeve. But not only has he suc- 
ceeded through perseverance and hard work in 
making his way from the ranks to a position of 
authority, but he has earned the praise and respect 
of those who served under him, and finest of all 
has earned the love and devotion of all his Brother 
Rats. Academics, however, didn't come so easily 
to Lewis and it has been a struggle all the way 
through, supplemented by an occasional session 
with the Floating University. It is a great tribute 
to him that he has grimly stuck to German and 
math and has come off with that justly deserved 
Dip. Trouble or no trouble, Lewis never tried very 
hard to keep his mind off the women, and thus 
resulted trips to Suffolk, and all the other Casano- 
vian eccentricities! 

We bid adieu to a Liberal Artist and a gentle- 
man. 



] 



m 



i 



\> 



m 



William Frrz-GERALo Brand, Jr. 

"Buddy" SAi.iiM, ViBGii 

Chemistry 
I-ulJ AuilU-jy 



Private (4, 2); Intramurals (4. 3, 2, 1); Corporal (3); V. A. 
S. (2, 1); Business Staff, liomb (1); Secretary', Symphony Orches- 
tra ( 1 ) ; Lieutenant ( 1 ) . 



In Billy we have one of the best examples of 
good natured bluster a Brother Rat could hope to 
find. His best friends call him Tuffy or the Ter- 
ror of the Stoop. It has been murmured around 
that he is a terror with the girls, too, and judging 
from his frequent appearances at Macon, HoUins, 
and Sweet Briar, we can easily believe it. Billy, 
we might add, has been one of those fortunates 
who has had a wonderful time in barracks and 
hasn't had to pay for it. 

Seriously, Billy is one of the best officers and 
students the Institute can boast of, and Salem has 
good reason to be proud of him. He has done his 
work well and should emerge from an array of 
broken test tubes and beakers to become an excel- 
lent chemist. As an officer and a gentleman he 
is unexcelled, and as a cadet he has earned the 
respect and friendship of all his Brother Rats. 
Keep smiling, Billy, and the world will indeed 
smile with and not at you; that's half the fight. 



Ilijlri ijl Lacy Bkavshaw 

Sumtt-ihUi, VtuctHfA 
Civil Hnf(ineer(nj{ 



r4, 3, 2, ir. Track M, 2); /; 
C. E. (1, I) 



1 Tract 111: A. S. 



Ilbert de Lacy Brayshaw is the son of a min- 
ister and, as a result, has shown us just what con- 
stitutes the best type of all-around regular fellow. 
Although he is not an academic "brow," "Col." 
has not only managed to keep well up in his stud- 
ies but still found time enough to be a good intra- 
mural man, horseman, track star, and first-class 
"buck." He has collected many trophies and rib- 
bons from the horse shows and intramural com- 
petitions. He is mighty proud of the fact that 
he has done his share toward keeping the blue rag 
attached to "F" Company's guideoni 

The "Colonel's" chief characteristic is his deter- 
mination to make good at V. M. I., and he has 
proceeded to do so by hard work. When a prob- 
lem comes up that calls for deep concentration, the 
"Colonel" is sure to be among the few who put in 
the time and effort required to get the correct re- 
sult — a trait which will stand him in good stead 
as a slip-stick manipulator. Because of this indus- 
try and ability, and his splendid character, wt ate 
all proud to have Ilbert Brayshaw as a Brother 
Rat. 





Lee Omar Brayton, Jr. 



Raymond Cecil Brittingham, Jr. 



Civil Engineering 
Field Artillery 



Civil Engineering 
Field Artillery 



Private (4, 3, 2. 1); Imramurals {4, 3, 2, 1); Basketball (4); 

Track (4); Tennis (2, 1); Assistant Manager, Tennis (2); Glee 

Club (2, U; A. S. C. E. (2, 1); Riding Club (2. 1). 



From out of Dyersburg, that metropolis in Ten- 
nessee, in case you don't recall, came "L. O." 
Brayton to make history in the annals of V. M. I. 
There are few indeed who haven't heard of his 
prowess at tennis. His has been "That Voice" in 
our own glee club these past two years that made 
the girls tingle with delight. 

A man with more concentration power was never 
known. How a man can study with the radio go- 
ing and about a dozen friends around him at once 
is nothing short of a miracle, yet to L. O. it was 
natural, and he did well, too. 

And the women? They never perturb L. O. 
Indeed, he is never satisfied unless sporting several 
around. It's too bad there weren't enough dances 
for him to have them to. L. O. is a whiz, indeed, 
around the ladies and at the wheel of an automo- 
bile. 

We shall all miss L. O. and his gay repartee; 
and it is with sadness that we say good-bye to the 
old maestro. 



(4); Football (4. 3, 2, I); Baseball (4, 3. 2. I); Corporal 
Jwimming (3); Monogram Club (3, 2, I); Second Class 
! Committee (2); Sergeant ( 2 ) ; A. S. C. E. (2, I ) ; Hop 
Committee (1 ) ; Lieutenant II). 



Ray was one of the more athletically inclined of 
the good brothers, for he played on both the var- 
sity football and baseball teams. "Brit" played for 
three seasons at right end for "Pooley" and the 
Fighting Squadron, and held down second base on 
the baseball team. 

An outstanding athlete, "Buddie" was also a 
major threat on "Buzz's" first team in the Civil 
Department. As a member of the Field Artillery 
and Company "E," his military advancement was 
rapid, for he was a corporal his third year, the 
next year a sergeant, and during his first class year 
Ray has been a lieutenant. 

In spite of the various e.xtra-curricular activities 
that the "Hampton Flash" has participated in, he 
has always had the time to trifle with his Brother 
Rats, too often finding his name displayed prom- 
inently on "Pinkey's bulletin board" though he 
never did become a member of the charmed circle 
of true two percenters. 






m 



I 



h 



m 



Claud Petkrson Brown;. r-Y, III 

■Pele" Nor-ioi.,:, Vmori 

Civil [■nKinfCTMiK 



Gkorcf, Cameron Rcuu 

Civil Eniyn»<rtin(( 



Priv 



(4 



]): Richmond Qub H, 3, 2. I); A. £ 
(2, 1): Keeper of the Kceferi, Barba'rf Gout IW. 



Private 14, 2, I); Boxing 141; Baseball 14); Corporal (3); A. S. 
C. E. (2, II; Assistant Manager, Track (2); Portsmouth Club 
(4, 3, 2, II; Color Guard (I); O. G.'s Asiociation (I); Club 
"123" (1); Mounted Pistol Expert (I); Rifle Marksman (1); 
Pistol Marksman (I). 



Pete came to us from Norfolk four years ago, 
but during his last three years has divided his at- 
tention between the home town and Richmond. 
Thf latter held a particularly strong attraction for 
him. Oley and the Civil Department presented 
no terrors for Pete, for he gave them the minimum 
amount of attention necesoary and still found 
plenty of time for his favored spot — the hay. 

At the beginning of his third class year Pete 
was adorned with chevrons, but because of love of 
a good time he was doomed to join the "brothers" 
in the ranks. His block running escapades were 
never impeded by the authorities. Because of its 
association with Pete's jovial personality, quick wit, 
and ability to win lasting friends by his contagious 
charm and good humor, Club "123" will never be 
forgotten. You'll have the best wishes of your 
Brother Rats, Pete. Good-bye and good luck! 



Called "Gilmore Charlie," "Carmelita Q." and 
other names by those who tried to beat the horses, 
few knew the real name of the barracks bookie; 
but everyone knew and loved his patient, genial 
nature. He never seemed to be interested in 
women, but could always be found haunting the 
mail room around 9:30 every morning. If there 
was any sport he loved, it was hunting. Many a 
fair Wednesday and Saturday afternoon found 
him shouldering the old shotgun for a quiet walk 
on the mill-road. He was on time at matricula- 
tion, but there his punctuality ended. A clubman 
of the first water, he was a charter member of 
"Club '39," a high-ranking private on the Barbary 
Coast, top-ranking two percenter, and a partner in 
the Diggs-Budd Fleecing Co. Academics were 
secondary to his "tick" operations, but he always 
managed to keep on the starry side of 7.5 in Oley s 
Athenaeum. Earnest when earnestness was neces- 
sary, happy-go-lucky the rest of the time, he made 
many friends; and, "Bookie," we of '39 are put- 
ting our money behind you, not to show, not to 
place, but "on the nose." 





Carter Lane Burgess 

■Coujii' "Budiiis" Roanoke, Vii 

Liberal Arts 



John Moyler Carpenter 



Chemistry 
C^rahy 



Private (4); Roanoke Club (4, 
Editor, Cjdet (3, 2, 1); Assistai 
L. A. Secretary (3); Floor Comm 
Committee ( 2 ) ; Color Sergeant 



(I); Advertising Manager, 



2, 1); Corporal (3); Radi; 

/lanager. Football (3); I. A 

(3, 2): Second Class Financ( 

Hop Committee ( 1 ) ; Lieu 



(1). 



K 3, 2. I); Roanoke Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Editori 
1); Exchange Editor, Cadet 

idem, Roanoke Club (1). 



A. S. (2, 1); Pri 



"The silence is deafening!" How many of the 
brothers have said that when the "Count" has sud- 
denly ceased his drumming in 156? His good 
cheer and ready wit exemplify Carter's disposition, 
and his frank invitation to "come in and hear the 
latest recordings," is the promise of a discussion 
of the true L. A.'s outlook upon life. 

The Peck's Bad Boy of Jefferson High shed his 
nonconformist attitude when he entered these bar- 
racks, and no one has had a more conscientious 
military career than he. He proved that a man 
could win when the tide of fortune appeared to be 
at its lowest. He has been rewarded with steady 
promotion, and he has received his honors not the 
easy way, as so many of us have acquired ours, but 
by diligent effort, and we admire him for this. 

Any man who exhibits both the ability and the 
desire to work during the formative years in col- 
lege is destined to be a major success in the serious 
career of life after graduation. 



Here is one of V. M. I.'s strongect supporters, 
and one who has been buffeted about by the fac- 
ulty more than any other man in the corps. Un- 
daunted by their hard usage, Johnny returned to 
summer school each year, and September found 
him back in barracks with his beloved Brother 
Rats, "the best bunch of boys in the world." He 
has earned his diploma, and if Jackson Hope Med- 
als were given in recognition of hard work instead 
of academic proficiency, Johnny would have one of 
these to accompany his sheepskin en graduation 
day. It should not be judged, however, that it is 
all work with Johnny, for underneath his deter- 
mination to graduate there is a happy-go-lucky, 
fun-loving streak that puts him right with the boys 
when there is fun of any sort going on. Deter- 
mination to overcome all obstacles in accomplish- 
ing his ambition, a keen sense of humor with a 
fun-loving nature, and a winning personality sum- 
marize Johnny Carpenter. What better qualities 
could be present in one individual? 



m 



I 



h 



m 



Douglas Wilmis Cakk 

NORT 



Bernartj PnzEK Cark-.r, Jr. 



Liberal Art* 
/■.<-W AtnlUrf 



Privaic (4, 3, 2. I); Fencing (4. 3, 2). 



Private M. 3, i, 1); Richmond Club M, 3. 2, U; Wreulinjc M); 
Business Staff, CWd (2); Assiuam Manager, Trail (2/; I. A, L. 
A. (2, !)• Club "123" (1;; Manaijer, Varsity Ooi»-Country (1); 
Color Guard II); Floor Committee (I); BoMlj Staff. Cmnaniu 
(I J ; Manager, Varsity Tract til. 



From Clearwater, Florida, "Doug" returned to 
his native state to complete his education at V. 
M. I. It is difficult to determine where his strong- 
est affections lie; with the old families of Virginia, 
from which he traces his lineage, or the sunny 
shores of the west coast of Florida. In the bar- 
racks bull sessions he favors the latter with his 
many stories of sailing in weather conditions in 
the many bays and inlets of the west coast. It is 
unusual for a Floridian to mention any but per- 
fect weather, but in his sailing stories, the truth 
sometimes slipped out. 

Doug did well in all his work at V. M. I., and 
stood high in his class in all subjects, but it is not 
this ability alone that will lead him to future suc- 
cess, for he has the faculty of getting along well 
with his fellow workers, helping them in their 
work, and making real friends. It is this coopera- 
tive spirit coupled with natural ability that has 
made Doug one of the real Brother Rats of the 
class of '39. 



When Sonny came to V. M. I. four years ago 
he brought with him those characteristics which 
have made him popular with all of us as one of 
the boys. He soon showed his ability to get the 
most enjoyment out of barracks life while taking 
academic work in the Liberal Arts Department in 
his stride. 

Sonny and his green Plymouth were frequently 
seen streaking toward Richmond for that hurried 
date, and apparently his record-breaking trips were 
always successful, as the presence of that same date 
at most of the dances in the last three years would 
seem to indicate. 

His varied interest in different phases of barracks 
life has been manifested by his work for The Ca- 
det, the Bomb, and the constant pleasure he al- 
ways brought to everyone. Few of us will ever for- 
get the cheerfulness which Sonny spread over "Club 
Row" during our first class year. 

We know he won't forget the Brother Rats that 
couldn't forget him. 





Philip Williams Chase 

Baltimc 
Electncal Engineermg 
Cayatry 



John William Chiles 

't" "Mac" Saint Petersburg, Fl 

Liberal Arts 

Cayalry 



■ate (4); Fencing Team (4. 3. 2); Corporal (3); Cajct Staff 
1); A. I. E. E. 12, 1); Sergeant (2); Private (1); O. G.'s 



(4); Football (4); Corporal (3); First Sergeant (2); 
Class Finance Committee (2); Hop Committee (I); Cap- 
in Horse Show Team ( 1 ) ; Battalion Commander ( 1 ) . 



Phil came to us from Baltimore, and his love 
for that city and for certain of its possessions has 
never wavered in the four years of his cadetship. 

Phil has many extra-curricular interests: he is 
an expert on automobiles; he has made models of 
various types of autos, and many of them are sur- 
prisingly fine likenesses; he is a lover of music, 
plays the piano, and has a collection of organ re- 
cordings. He knows almost all the bands in the 
country and keeps a notebook of songs that have 
been popular through the years. Much of what 
has just been said is probably news to the bro- 
thers of '39, for Phil is too modest to make his 
accomplishments known. He is almost never heard 
to say a derogatory word about anyone. This 
habit, combined with many other qualities, has 
secured for him many friends who will not soon 
forget him. 



Behind Junior's outward appearance there is a 
character which his looks do not falsely represent. 
It was inevitable even in our Rat year that John 
would be a leader in barracks life. He has ac- 
complished that position of leadership, and we of 
the corps and of the class of '39 are more fortu- 
nate for it. Yet John has never been anything 
but himself in his rise to the commandership of 
the first battalion. He was not afraid to take 
chances, took them, and suffered for them; but 
in the end he achieved his goal because of the 
undeniable truth of that well-known phrase, "You 
can't keep a good man down." Those of us who 
have been closely associated with John have ac- 
quired both an aifection and a respect for him. 

It is indeed unfortunate that we cannot go on 
to tell you here of Junior's other accomplishments, 
but space is limited. We promise you there are 
many. Just look on the other pages of this book 
and you are bound to find them. 



] 



m 



I 



I 



m 



Wii.MAM Winston Cor.i-:MAN 

"Dog Eart" RoANoKl!, VlKGINI. 

Chcmi.stry 

l-u-lj Ailillcy 



Li'.oNAKu Sf-.r.isy Cjxipf.k 



Pr».Medicjl 
l-itld A,lilUty 



me (4); Football (4, 3, 2, 1); Baskotball (4, 3, 2, I); In 
al Tennis Champion (4); Monogram Club (3, 2, 1); Var 
inis (3, 2); Corporal (3); Color SerRcant (2); V. A. S. (2. 



There is no exaggeration in saying that for the 
writer to do justice to Dog Coleman in the space 
allotted here, or even in a much greater space, is 
almost impossible. 

Dog has been a sixty-minute athlete, a fine 
student, and a popular and efficient officer as a 
cadet in V. M. I. We could give you more de- 
tails on these particulars, but we must not fail to 
tell you some things about W. W. which make 
him a choice Brother Rat. 

We all know people whom we like to have 
around us. To say exactly why would involve too 
much detail. At any rate, Dog is one of those 
persons. He has an even temper, is interested in 
books and in current events, seldom has a critical 
word to say about anyone, and is possessed with a 
balance unusual in one so young. His sense of 
values is obvious, because he knows what is im- 
portant and lays stress upon it, not wasting time 
and energy on non-essentials. Those who have 
really come to know Dog will not forget him as a 
sincere and everlasting friend. 



(4. 3, 2, 1); Businnt Staff, Cadel II); V, A. S. (2, 1); 
Second Clau Show (I ; ; Prnbyuriah Qub l\). 



Leonard Cooper hails from Manchester, Eng- 
land, by way of Cumberland, Maryland. During 
his cadetship, Len has spent most of his time in 
intensive extra-curricular reading, with occasional 
time out for necessary studying; nevertheless, in 
him may be found a rare combination of mental 
quickness and intellectual dexterity. 

Cooper loves to argue. His "good pxjint," 
"pish tofh," and ''You know what I always say," 
are familiar to all of us. Who can forget his rep- 
resentation of that femme fatale. Madam Waleska, 
in the '39 Second Class Show, when in sitting 
down he made the normal male gesture of pulling 
up his trousers at the knees? 

At Fort Hoyle his escapades were many and 
varied — especially memorable was the time he got 
lost in a mustard gas area. Len intends to be- 
come a doctor, and if the medical aptitude test 
means anything, he will go far, for he took the 
fourth highest stand that has ever been made at 
V. M. L Leonard is an interesting person to 
know, a grand friend to have, and above all else, 
he is a true British gentleman. 





William Henry Cox 



Prc-Medici 



William Atkinson Cracraft 



Charleston. West Virginia 



Private (4); Football (4); Intramurals (4, 3, 2, 1); Corporal (3); 
Glee Club (3, 2, 1); Q. M. Sergeant (2); Assistant Manager, 
Football (2); Business Staff, The Cadet (2); Hunt Club (2, 1); 
V. A. S. (2, 1); Lieutenant (1); Subscription Manager, The Cadet 
(1); Manager, "Rat" Football (I); Pistol Team (1); Athletic 
Council (1). 



Four years ago a veddy, veddy chubby lad en- 
tered the famous Washington Arch with an in- 
tense look on his cheerful face, a look of wide-eyed 
interest and consuming ambition. 

"Wussie," as Bill is affectionately called, turned 
out to be all that our first impression of him por- 
tended. He is truly one of the most cheerful peo- 
ple we ever had the pleasure of knowing, and 
because of this cheerfulness he was always a person 
to whom we could turn in times of bitter need 
for a kind word or a cheerful thought. In addi- 
tion to this affability, "Wus" was ever sincere in 
his ambitions and endeavors. He came to V. M. I. 
with the ambition and intention of becoming a doc- 
tor after leaving here; he has never wavered from 
that goal one iota. 

Further to his credit is his military prowess; as 
first lieutenant of "C" Company he easily ob- 
tained the respect and admiration of all the men 
under him. 



(4, 3, 2, 1); V. A. S. (2, 1); O. G.'s Associai 



Billy came to us from the hills of West Virginia, 
and since that city is something of a chemical cen- 
ter he decided to join up with Butch and his boys 
after his third class year. Here he has made a 
good record, as he has in the other activities he 
has entered into. 

Horses had an appeal for Billy, and he has 
been a running member of "C" Company during 
the four years. 

Billy is one of the quieter members of the ranks 
of '39, and one of the youngest. He has never 
been one to put himself in the limelight in any way, 
but those of us who know him best have a realiza- 
tion of his sterling qualities. 

We are not sure just what Billy will do when 
he leaves V. M. I. He will probably go back to 
Charleston as a chemist and demonstrate the fact 
that the innumerable hours he spent at the board 
in Maury-Brooke Hall have not been in vain. We 
do know that he carries with him the true spirit 
of V. M. I. 



m 



i 



\> 



m 



Henry Joseph Cronin 

I.AWMiiNci:, Massachusetts 

Civil RnBiiuennt; 
FiclJ Ajlillcy 



Chalmers Carolyn Crump 



'll/ftlf>, VlKAIMfA 



Civil EngintCTinjj 
rUIJ ArlMny 



Private (4.- 2, 1): Orchestra (4. J. 2, 1); Yankee Qub ('4, 3. 

2, 1); Corporal (3); Boxing (4, 3); A. S. C. E. (2. 1); Glee 

Cluh (2, 1); Secret EiKht (1). 



Private r4); Ambassador Club 14, 3, 2. I); Boiing M); Cocporal 

(3J; Orchestra (3, 2); Sergeant (2); A. S. C. E, f2, U; Un<- 

t.nam ro. 



Hank, or "The Wild Irishman," as he is affec- 
tionately called by all his Brother Rats, is one of 
the most popular men in barracks — popular not 
only with his classmates, but also with his instruc- 
tors. His infectious laugh and ready sense of 
humor make him liked by all. Quite versatile, he 
takes a genuine interest in all that goes on at V. 
M. I. For four years this Bostonian has been one 
of the shining lights of the Commanders, and the 
Glee Club would have been lost without his skillful 
accompaniment. In spite of membership in the O. 
G.'s Association, Cronin was dubbed Barbary 
Coast Colossal Cossack by the Emir. If there is 
any fun going on anywhere. Hank is sure to be 
found in the center of it, for he is one of those 
rare individuals who knows how to get the most 
out of life. 

Hank is going to West Point. If honesty, cour- 
tesy, and appealing personality mean anything in 
the army, we know that Cronin is headed for the 
top. His record here in the hearts of his friends is 
spotless! 



Before entering V. M. I., "C. C." had a work- 
ing knowledge of things military, and he was not 
long in recognizing his advantage. Consequently, 
he has since risen steadily in rank. He's proved 
himself to be an efficient officer, yet has remained 
one of the boys, and has never taken his military 
too seriously. 

' D" Company will miss him greatly, not only 
as an officer, but also for his faithful participation 
in many intramural sports. He made his bid for 
fame his Rat year as a member of the cadet or- 
chestra. At the end of his third class year, how- 
ever, he felt he could better devote his entire time 
to hit studies. 

In scholastic pursuits he has also been above 
average. He has worked hard and has steadily 
advanced. It was, however, not until his first class 
year that he became a full-fledged "Brow," al- 
though his stand had always been high. If tenac- 
ity of purpose and the ability to stay with a prob- 
lem until it is solved is any measure of success, 
then Chalmers' success is assured. 





Henry Clay Davis 

Willis Wharf, Virgin 



Private (4. 3, 2, 1); Baseball (4); V. A. S. (2, 1); O. G.' 
Association (1). 



One of Eastern Shore's contributions to the class 
of '39 is known by many names, but to his friends 
it's just plain "Nose." 

Clay is not one of the so-called "Brows," but 
he is a chemist of no mean ability and has been 
consistently among the leaders. Never aspiring to 
anything military, he has been "one of the boys" 
throughout his career. In the affairs of the heart 
it is a different story; he stands high and yields an 
advantage to no one. He has not been one to 
limit his attentions to a particular girl or school. 
The 'Nose" is familiar on the campuses of both 
Hollins and Randolph-Macon. 

As a friend he cannot be surpassed. His win- 
ning smile, keen sense of humor, and ready wit has 
endeared him to all, Brother Rats and underclass- 
men alike. 

We don't know what he is going to do when he 
graduates, but it is our bet that he will be on top 
before many years have passed. 



Dudley Perkins Digges 

■'Dud-' SCHENECTADV. NeW Y( 

Liberal Arts 
Field Arnllery 

Private (4. 1); Intratnurals (4, 3, 2, 1); Yankee Club (4. 3, 2, 
Corporal (3); Orchestra (3); Manager and Director, Orchestra 
1); Sergeant (2); Academic Stars (2, 1); Second Class Fina 
Committee (2); Editorial^ Staff, Cadet (2); President, Hop O 
iter, Bomb (1); O. D.'s Roster (1) 



"Swing it on the off-beat" — "O. K., we'll get 
that orchestra" — "Incidentally, have you read" — 
"How about another can" — These are just a few 
of the fragments that fly from 138 in general and 
from Dudley in particular. Dud in his four years 
here has done so much that it is impossible to do 
him justice in this short space. A member of the 
Second Class Finance Committee and President of 
the Hop Committee, he has seen to it that the 
brothers have gotten the best that Sweet or Swing 
can produce. As leader and trombone featurist of 
the orchestra he has led the Commanders to un- 
precedented accomplishments. As a writer his 
work has been a great source of pride to The Cadet 
and to the Bomb. Finally, as a fellow student and 
a gentleman, he ranks among our most respected 
and beloved Brother Rats. Academically, Dud 
seems to wear his liberal arts stars without a bit of 
effort and still have plenty of time for his library 
and to exercise his wit on Podo. All the success 
in the world, Dud, and may you make as fine a 
lawyer as you have a Brother Rat! 



m 



I 



^ 



m 



\ 



Harrison Cahlkton Diggs, Jr. 

■•Hmi-Ka,r NkWCOLT Nf.WS, VlBO.Nf, 

Pre Mi'dical 

Hull! A,nlU;y 



(4 2. 1); Baseball (4); Basketball (4); V. A. S. (2, 1); 
Intramural Manaeer (I); O. G.'s Assodation (U; Chancellor 
Exchequer, Barbary Coast (1). 



Hari-Kari is undoubtedly one of the moct orig- 
inal of the brothers. Any new witticism arising 
from the first stoop can always be traced to our 
own Newport News fashion plate, and any myste- 
rious murmurings from "E" Company's third pla- 
toon usually emanate from H. Carlton putting 
the brothers on the latest in clothes, recordings, 
horses, or women. Just give H. a Ray Noble re- 
cording, a good poker game, or a copy of Esquire, 
and he is in his element. He has always concerned 
himself more with the fair sex than with chevrons, 
but his undying interest in intramurals has made 
him an invaluable asset to the "5th ranking com- 
pany." A high-living Pre-Med, he has never taken 
classes too seriously, yet he makes the honor roll 
when he's in the mood, and every now and then 
gets the best of the Doc and the Butch. 

We have observed in the past four years that, 
with all his other characteristics, Harry entertains 
a most fervent interest in surgery; may he do great 
work in relieving pain, preventing death, and pro- 
longing life. 



Frank Sampson Diuguid, Jp. 

"Sumbo" l.lU'MhtJUC, VlBAIMIA 

Liberal Aru 

IntramuraU (4, 3, 2, I); Lynchburg Club M, J, 2. 1): A, W. O. 
L. Night Oub li. 2, I); Editorial Staff, The. Cadrl (5): Aj4i«ir« 
Manogcr. Track (2); Bmincu Staff, Iht Cadel 121; Inlramo/al 
Council (2. 1): Hunt Club (2, I); I- A. I,. A, 12, I); Int/a- 
murai Company Manager ( 1 ^ . 

When Frank, Sam-Sam, or Sambo, as he has 
been variously called during different periods of 
his cadetship, entered '39, the rest of the class soon 
realized that one of the greatest raconteurs in bar- 
racks cou'-d be inveigled into a bull session morn- 
ing, noon or night; we have not the slighteit doubt 
but that some of Sam's famous stories will be mak- 
ing the rounds of barracks long after their author 
has embarked on more adventures. 

In intramurals, "A" Company has always stood 
near if not at the top, and much of its record dur- 
ing the past year has been due to Sam's tireless 
efforts as company manager. As a member of the 
Lynchburg Club he has epitomized the true hospi- 
tality of that all-important city, for Sam's home 
has always been a mecca for week-ending first class- 
men. 

Soldier, sailor, gentleman, writer, lawyer, con- 
sul, or business man, whatever he turns to (and his 
versatility is apt to turn him to any) we know that 
he will make as many true friends and admirers as 
he has in barracks. 








John Pitts Dorrier 

SCOTTSVI 
Civil Engineering 
F,flJ ArnUcry 



John McKee Dunlap, Jr. 

"I^ck" Lexington, Vmaii- 

Civil Engineering 



1); Football (4); Wrestling (4); A. S. C. E. 
12. 1); O. G.'s Association (I). 



From the midst of Scottsville's three thousand 
came John Pitts Dorrier to begin the matriculation 
of a long list of Dorriers of his generation at V. 
M. I. He is now about to graduate, leaving 
unique footsteps for his brother to follow. 

We have watched this good-natured Brother Rat 
master the Civil Engineering course, but not with- 
out a great deal of hard, steady work, for which 
he has shown an amazing faculty. 

For three years we had reason to believe that "J. 
P." was a woman hater, but during the last of our 
four years he became an enthusiastic devotee of 
Randolph-Macon in general and one member of its 
student body in particular. 

Though somewhat inclined to reticence ordi- 
narily, John has wandered onto the scene of many 
a barracks bull session where he has found the 
temptation to join in irresistible. 

In spite of his quiet and reserve, John Dorrier 
has not concealed from the members of his class 
those characteristics for which we have admired 
him. 



Private (4. 3. :, I); O. G.'s Ass< 



(1). 



Wuxtra! Wuxtra! "Local Boy Makes Good" — 
Read all about it! Yes, John McKee Dunlap, Jr., 
is a Lexington boy who has made a hit with every- 
one who knows him. The best way to get an in- 
dication of a cadet's character is to ask his room- 
mates how he stands in their opinion. Jack's 
roommates are full of praise for their side-kick. 
They say he is easy to get along with, friendly, 
conscientious, and a hard worker. Furthermore, he 
is full of fun. Jack has the distinction of being 
the only sentinel who has thrown fire-crackers while 
he was on post. 

Jack has an insatiable appetite. His favorite 
sport is listening to a symphony on the radio while 
sucking an orange. In fact, almost all his extra- 
curricular activity is carried on in his stomach. 

This boy can really argue! It doesn't matter 
which side you take on the issue, Dunlap will argue 
you blue in the face. Start m on politics and he 
has a field day. 

As far as women are concerned, they say 
the seemingly invulnerable fall the hardest. Take 
it easy. Jack! 



] 



m 



E 



h 



m 



Harry Clifford Dunton, Jr. 

"H. C." TOWNSHNU, ViKGlNJ, 

Civil Enninft-ring 

Private (4, 3, 2. 1); A. S. C, E. (2. 1); O. G.'s Association (1) 



From the eastern shore of old Virginia there 
wandered into the barracks the inimitable Harry, 
and he immediately took to military life like a 
summer school student takes to the Beach Club. 

Dunton spent four years in the ranks of "A" 
Company as a certified private. However, he did 
show his military ability his first class year as one 
of the more efficient members of the O. G.'s roster. 
In fact, his presence in the courtyard kept more 
third classmen off the stoop than the appearance 
of our own "Pinkey." 

The amazing talent of "H. C." to trifle and 
then stop just in time to keep from getting boned 
was an art. Because of this notable ability he was 
able to stay well below the dangerous demerit 
boundary. 

As a member in good standing of the Civil 
Department, "H. C." spent his allotted time in the 
penthouse erasing lines from inaccurate drawings. 
However, knowing that perseverance does pay, he 
was finally awarded his dividend. 



WlI.l.lAM MURRELI. Ef.HOI-S 

"Red" i^OHT.UOUTH, WtkGtUtA 

Civil EniiinMrrinij 

Priv.nte 14); Footb.ill (4. 3. 2. I); Tract (4, }, 2, 1); Wrertling 
|4); Corporal I i ) ; MonoKram Club (}, 2, I); Intramural Bojinij 
Champion lunlimittd) (3); Port.mouth Qub (3, 2, 1); Intramural 
WrestlinB Champion ( unlimited) (2); Glee Qub 12, l); A. S. 
C. B. 11, \); Hunt Club (2); Captain (1). 

This red-headed boy from the wilds of Tide- 
water is known to every man in the corps, especially 
for his superior contributions to V. M. I. athletics. 
"Red" is a godsend to a football and track coach, 
for he can "hold that line," sling a javelin and 
shot, and broad-jump along with the best of them. 
Football at V. M. I. without him will seem dull, 
for his outstanding playing has spelled many a vic- 
tory for the Big Red Team. 

To determine his ability along the military line, 
one needs only to recall that his was the command- 
ing voice of "A" Company. And women? Why, 
he has hundreds of them, but his opinion is still 
the same, "I don't want any girl falling in love 
with me." Academically, he is no "slouch," always 
managing to get along easily and still have time to 
associate with his many Brother Rats who deem 
him the "tops." To know Red is to like and ad- 
mire him greatly for his humor, genial personality, 
and most of all for being "B'rr Echols" — this 
Craddock Hi Flash of Temple football fame. 





Richard Augustus Edwards 

RiCHMOH 
Liberal Arts 
Field Ariillery 



Baseball (4, 3. 2, 1); Private (4, 2, 1); Wrestlir 
(3); Second Class Finance Coinmittee (2); As 
Basketball (2); Business Sta£f, Cadet (2); I. A. 
Hop Committee { 1 ) ; Manager, Basketball ( 1 ) ; Seci 
Council (1): Monogram Club. 



(4 ) ; Corporal 
tant Manager. 



During his tour years at V. M. I., Gus Edwards 
has devoted himself to his school and to his class. 
Especially prominent in the field of athletics, he 
was the manager of the basketball team and won 
his numerals in baseball and wrestling as well as 
a letter in baseball. As a member of the Second 
Class Finance Committee and the Hop Commit- 
tee, he held positions of importance and trust. A 
Beau Brummel at heart, Gus always keeps a sup- 
ply of the latest in "cits" hidden about his room. 
He also has a bit of the Casanova in his blood — 
as the Sweetbriar Sect can well attest. This Vir- 
ginian comes from Smithfield, the home of the 
hams, and is proud of it. Gus is a true Liberal 
Artist at heart, and has chosen law as his future 
profession. He maintains definite political views. 
After-taps sessions have shown that, once started, 
the only direction he will take is towards his own 
goal. Undoubtedly he will be successful, for he 
has already proven his capabilities for organization 
and management. 



Henry Watkins Ellerson, Jr. 

-Walt- Richmond, Virgini.^ 

Chemistry 
Cayalry 

Private (4), Football (4); Track (4); Second Class Show (4, 3, 
2); Corporal (3): Secretary, Glee Club (3); Glee Club (3, 2, 1); 
Q. M. Sergeant (2); Director, Second Class Show (2); Editorial 
and Business Staffs, The Cadet (2); Second Class Finance Commit- 
tee (2); AssiLtant Manager, Basketball (2); Lieutenant (1); Hop 
Committee (11; Busine.ss Manager, The Cadet (1); Manager, Glee 
Club (1); Manager, "Rat" Basketball (I). 

We've always called him Watt. In Webster's 
Dictionary we find a WATT defined as "A unit 
of power," and we know that the truth of the 
statement is borne out in him. In the course of 
the past four years he has been in the direct current 
of the Institute life and a major part of it. 

Throughout Watt's stay in barracks he has been 
known by each man as one who possesses excep- 
tionally strong and healthy ideals, coupled with a 
willingness to lend his consideration and coopera- 
tion to all problems. 

As the years have rolled along he has consistently 
revealed himself as a pattern of versatility. We 
saw him deftly managing and successfully produc- 
ing "Captain Applejack," our Second Class Show, 
in the spring of '38. In addition, all of Watt's 
military manner and conduct will be remembered 
as the symbol of efficiency. 

For four years we have seen his every undertak- 
ing characterized by efficiency, and we feel that 
his future will abound with success. 



m 



I 



\> 



m 



Arnom) Wright Ellis 

■•A. W." RitMMON]), VlKOlNl. 

Civil EnBinccrinB 
l-icia Artillery 



Fletcher Burns Emerson 

HO"JSTO!<, Tr;X/i.« 

Cii/il Enii/nreiinii 
fitid AtlMrry 



Private (4); Football (4); Boxing (4. 3); Corporal IJ); Monogram 
Club (3, 2, 1); Sergeant (2); Second Class Finance Committee (2); 
A. S. C. E. (2, I); Hop Committee (1); Lieutenant (1); Se- 
cret "15." 



Early in the fall of '35, a fair-haired boy with a 
cautious smile left the warm fires of his Richmond 
home and wended his way to the institution for 
boys at Lexington. Thus upon the scene arrived 
the inimitable Arnold W. Ellis, better known to his 
Brother Rats as just "A. W." 

No one knows, except Ellis and his Maker, why 
he forsook Shakespeare or a brace of test tubes, 
but "A. W." chose to serve his time under the 
rousing regime of "Oley," and the Department of 
Civil Engineering. 

Cursed from the start of his career by the 
shadow of a set of lieutenant's chevrons, he did his 
utmost to retain his status as "just one of the 
boys." He was successful to the extreme. As 
premier "rabble rouser" of the "Dirty Dozen," he 
vindicated his station with a few lusty swings of a 
paint brush. 

And so, "A. W.," carefree, courageous, and 
ready to go at the drop of a hat, yet at the same 
time possessed of a more serious side, is sure to 
temper rash action with judgment. 



Private (4, 3, 2, 1), A. W. O. L. Night Oufa (3, 2. 1); Se««id 

Class Show (3K Individual Intramural Oiampioruhip Trophy (3j; 

Assistant Manager. Basketball (J>; Texas Qiib (2, I); Inframu/al 

Council (2, IJ; A. S. C. E. (2, \). 



"Great balls of fire, you could have knocked 
me over with a certified feather." The mouths 
gape, and the legs go up on the table as Podo is 
off on another tale of a Lynchburg week-end. 
Week-ends came few and far between, however, 
and the "tallster" from Texas managed to cram a 
lot between them during his years at V. M. \. 
During his third class year Podo managed to pile 
up more points in all intramural athletics than any 
one else and took the individual intramural cup. 

In intercollegiate athletics Podo found that the 
best idea was to allow the horse to do the work, 
and the sight of the galloping ghost from Houston 
astride a small polo pony with his long legs almost 
dangling on the ground has chilled the heart of 
many a ten-goaler. 

In the years to come, wherever and whenever 
"Great balls of fire" rings out, the brothers will 
flock to the most amiable and swellest of them all. 





Charles Edward Feddeman, Jr. 

'■NeJ-' ■■ir.njy'- CHESTER, PenNS 

Civil Engineering 
FnlJ ArnlUry 



Russell Harrison Ferrey 

Port Nelson, Ont, 
C^yahy 



Private (4, 2, 1): Football (4, 3, 2, 1); Yankee Club (4, 3, 2, 1) 

Episcopal Choir (4, 3, 2, 1); Corporal (3); Property Manage 

Second Class Show (2); Vice-President, Episcopal Club (2); Gle 

Club (2, 1); A. S. C. E. (2, 1); Episcopal Club (2, 1). 



(4, 3, 2, 1); Cross-Country (4, 3, 2, 1); Track (4, 3, 
Yankee Club (4, 3. 2, 1); Captain, Cross-Country (1); V. 
(2, 1); Monogram Club; Hunt Club; O. G.'s Association 
(1); Presbyterian Club (1). 



"Certify I've been fouled!" or "I just wrote her 
a letter telling her oif properly!" are perhaps his 
most quoted expressions, but there are many others. 

The "Dutchman" landed at V. M. I. in a cloud 
of dust and vituperation, and his leaving will 
mark the beginning of a period of unnatural quiet. 
It is this quality that makes a unique place for him 
in the hearts of all with whom he comes in contact. 
There is scarcely another '39er who is more well 
known, either in barracks or at the nearby girls' 
schools. He leaves a niche in the V. M. I.'s halls 
that we suspect will go unfilled for a long time. 

A hectic Rat year led inevitably to an equally 
hectic third class year, finding "Windy" the as- 
tonished possessor of a set of stripes. Apparently 
the "Breeze" is allergic to stripes, however, for by 
May his sleeves were clean again and none the 
worse for wear. His most exemplary trait is that 
of f>erseverance, as evidenced by his four years of 
hard work for the Big Red Team. It is this qual- 
ity that will crack the world for you. Windy. 



"Come to attention all along!" "What for, that's 
just 'My Country 'Tis of Thee . . . '?" "The 
devil you say, it's 'God Save the King'!" And 
so we have "Russ," the fair-haired boy from north 
of the Great Lakes, proud of both his nationalities, 
and to this day never quite sure as to which it is. 

But Russell came to V. M. I. to prove again 
that the name of Ferrey could not go unrecognized. 
"Russ" never entertained high military ambitions, 
he never wore stars, but next year "Son" Read will 
know that he has lost a good track man. Long of 
leg, and fast in stride, "Russ" has for four years 
shown his heels to many a good quarter-miler. His 
captaincy of the "harriers" speaks for itself. 

Yet "Russ" had interests other than track and 
his test tubes in the "Dutch's" lab. It would be 
hard to tell that such an unassuming lad was one 
of the original "married men" of '39, but ever since 
his Rat year he has been an honorary "alumanum" 
of the "Sem." Yes, a Bachelor of Science only, 
but a man, a friend ... a real Brother Rat. 






m 



\ 



h 



m 



George Peek Fosque 

f" ■■I'rck" Ha/. 

I.ilur.il Art^ 

l-u-UI Arnllay 



Private (4, :, 1); Coipoi.nl (3); Editori.il Staff, / /u- Cijel ( ), 2); 

Bu.smMs Staff, Ihf CuJi-{ (2); Spoits Staff (2, I); Absistant Man- 

ager, Football (2); Intramural Council (1); O. G.'s Association 

(1); Club "121." 



George started his career as a cadet with the 
Class of 1938. He has associated himself so closely 
with the centennial class, however, that it is hard 
for us to think of him as anything but a true 
Brother Rat. 

George took the artillery as his unit when he 
came to the Institute, and he has been a boon to 
"D" Company ever since, especially by his con- 
tinued participation in intramurals. 

As a Liberal Artist, George has not overworked. 
He has applied himself, however, and has profited 
from all sides of V. M. I. life. 

He is a Casanova of no mean ability, and to 
any man who has been in the corps from 1937 to 
1939 his escapades to Hollins and Sweetbriar are 
well known. 

It is unfortunate when a siege in the hospital 
causes a man to lose a year, but his loss has cer- 
tainly been our gain. 



CyRiL Vauohan I-raser, Jr. 

f" "Cy" "C, Vauy,hun" t^if.HUC 



Private (4. 3, 2, 1); Boxinn (4); Richmond Club (4, 3. 2. 1); 

Tcnni.» (3, 2. 1); V. A. S. (2, ]); The Cadel Staff (2. I); 

Supreme anj Revered Potentate and tHMIR. Batbary Coait (I). 



Salaam to the Suave Sultan, all ye varletil Here 
comes the Barbary Coast's one and only Emirl 
From down Richmond way on that fateful day 
came the man destined to hold the lives of some 
forty first classmen in the palm of his hand. 
With monastic severity he trained for the position 
of Emir from his Rat year, scorning such evils of 
the flesh as chevrons and academic distinction, and 
giving himself wholeheartedly to the enjoyment of 
life. In an unguarded moment he enlisted among 
Butch's Bully Boys, but true to his word, he deftly 
fought off the onslaughts of "Rocks" and the Mad 
Physician, and emerged at Finals bloody — but un- 
beaten. 

Laying out a strict health program his Rat year, 
which consisted of long walks in the country on 
free afternoons, he followed the routine to the let- 
ter. A Hollins lassie, however, drew all of his 
attentions his third class year. 

It is with a profound bow, and best w-ishes in 
our hearts, that we turn over the Emir of the Bar- 
bary Coast to the tender mercies of a waiting 
world. 





N 



Charles William Frazier, Jr. 



Civil Engineering 
Field ArnlUry 



Howard Overton Golladay 



ectrical Engineer! 
Field Artillery 



Private (4, 3, 2, 1); Richmond Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Wrestling (4); 
A. S. C. E. (2 1); Color Guard (1); Academic Stars (1); 
O. G.'s Association (1); Club "123" (1); Pistol Sharpshooter (1). 



Private (4, 3, 2); Assistant Manager, ' 
(2, 1); Intramural Manager Company 



(2); A. I. E. E. 



Presenting one of the most popular men in bar- 
racks — Bill Frazier. Bill came to V. M. I. with 
no high military aspirations and consequently has 
been perfectly happy to remain in the ranks during 
his stay and to become very much "one of the 
boys." He found his calling in the Civil Depart- 
ment and has stayed on top with practically no 
effort at all. 

As a lover Bill has had no peer — the same girl 
to every dance during his four years. Bill's charm 
and personality have never been absent, and have 
always been peculiarly evident at Sweetbriar. 

Familiar was the scene of Bill's cape and box of 
sandwiches canvassing the barracks, and his finan- 
cial achievements rank him among the famous bar- 
racks salesmen, past and present. 

Bill's inherent ability to win friends and the effi- 
cient manner in which he performs his duties are 
qualities which will carry him far, and we know 
that the employer who gets Bill will be fortunate 
in having a fine capable man, one of the best of 
the brothers. 



"The best things come in small packages." That 
old adage must have been written for "Emma." 
The few Brother Rats who have been privileged 
with his intimacy have known "Emma" as a true 
and loyal friend and a hard and earnest worker. 
His conscientious efforts have aided "D" Company 
immeasurably in their race for the Garnett An- 
drews Cup. His leadership in intramurals was rec- 
ognized by his selection as a member of the Intra- 
mural Council. 

The story has been told that when "Emma" left 
Scottsville to enroll at the Institute, the population 
was decreased by twenty-five per cent, but that me- 
tropolis' loss was our gain. In knowing "Emma" 
we have seen the true meaning of the word "mod- 
esty." Ever anxious to help, he has not been one to 
look for praise or recognition of his efforts. The 
O. G.'s are proud to claim him as a member of 
their organization. Likewise the entire class of 
nineteen hundred and thirty-nine is proud to have 
the right to call him "Brother Rat." 






m 



I 



h 



m 



Stanley Hope Graves 

On 
Civil HnginciTinn 
Field Arlillcjy 



Private (4. 3, 2, 1); Nonhoin VirR.nia Club (4, 3, 2, 
S, C. E. (2, 1); Assistant Manager. Football (2); O. G.' 



'S. H." came to us from Orange, Virginia, in 
1935, with the iidea already in mind of being a 
civil engineer. This idea he has carried out to 
its happy conclusion through consistently hard 
work, and an attitude which could bring only the 
best results. "S. H." has had a disgust for the 
Liberal Artist hay hound since his first week as a 
cadet, and he has made sure that his career re- 
mained far afield from such time-consuming ac- 
tivity. 

We have seen Stanley in action as an O. G., and 
as an active member of the A. S. C. E. and the 
Northern Virginia Club. We have also seen him 
lend his willing and able hand to the "Fighting 
Squadron" as assistant manager of football. 

In spite of Stanley's conscientiousness and his 
full schedule of activities, he always found time to 
give a friendly hand to all those with whim he 
came in contact. This quality and others will fix 
him forever in the memories of his friends. 



Thomas Wooorow Gray 

■■tVonjy N'jtHiLIc, V|>CI»IA 

Liberal Aru 

I-itlJ AriilUrj 

Private (1); Football (4, }, 2, I); Baxball U. 3, 2, 1); Man- 
ber Norfolk-Portsmouth Club (4. 3. 2, i ) ; Wrwtling (4); Cor- 
poral (3); General Committee (J, 2, I ) ; Q. M. Seriit>am (2); 
Second Class Show (2); Vi«-Pr«j<ient, Fir.t CU»; Honor Court 
(3, 2, 1); Hop Committee (1); Lieucenant (1); Caputn. Baseball 
n J ; Secretary, Monogram Oub i I ) . 

It is impossible to give due credit to "Woody" 
in this short space allotted here. We can only 
give a few of his outstanding achievements which 
have brought laud and honor to the class and the 

Institute. 

Almost from the moment of his matriculation, 
"Woody" became a leader among us, his Brother 
Rats. Our faith in him has been more than vindi- 
cated by his undying enthusiasm and brilliant lead- 
ership as vice-president of our class. 

On the athletic field, "Woody" has always been 
one of our brightest stars. A member of our cele- 
brated Rat football team, he has since become one 
of the finest guards in Institute history. And by 
way of incidentals, he made a superlative outfielder 
as captain of the baseball team, to say nothing of 
his fine wrestling ability in the unlimited class. 

Militarily, "Woody" was a "Gold Coaster" of 
ancient vintage — corporal, supply sergeant, first 
lieutenant. The time of parting has come, 
'"Woody"; may your present honors be only fore- 
runners of the even greater ones which await you. 





Lloyd Marcus Griffin, Jr. 



William Maurice Haislip 



Civil Engineering 

Cavahy 

Private (4); Richmond Club (4, 3, 2. 1); Football (4, 3); Basket- 
ball (4. 3); Corporal (31; Regimental Sergeant Major (2); Busi- 
ness Staff, The Cadet (2); Vice-President, N. Y. A. Board (2); 
Floor Committee, A. S. C. E. (2); Academic Stars (2, 1); Regi- 
mental Captain Adjutant (1); President, N. Y. A. Board (1); 
Chairman Floor Committee, A. S. C. E. (1); Club "123" (1); 
Kille Sharo-hootcr (1): Pistol Shaipdiootcr (1). 

The American flag has nothing on Buddy with 
its stars and stripes, for his prowess along the aca- 
demic and military lines is emblazoned on his 
sleeves. It was with leaden hearts that we heard 
our adjutant read out our penalties and his own 
with equal gusto. The office of regimental adju- 
tant is no easy one to fill, but in Bud's capable 
hands the duties were performed with ease and effi- 
ciency. 

As a ladies' man he's always been well in de- 
mand, but, as yet, no member of the fair sex has 
captured his heart. His excursions to the neigh- 
boring havens of femininity have been many, the 
Briar Patch being his most frequent haunt. 

It has been a real pleasure to have Buddy as a 
Brother Rat, for it is far too seldom that we find 
combined in one man the genuine qualities which 
he possesses, qualities which have made him one of 
the most highly respected men in barracks. As 
Buddy leaves V. M. I. he leaves a position which 
will be difficult to fill, both in the Institute and in 
the hearts of all who have known him. 



Civil Engineering 
FtelJ Arnllery 



(4); Track (4, 3, 2, 1); Coiporal (3); Regimental Supply 
It (2); A. S. C. E. (2. 1); Monogram Club (2, 1); 
Regimental Supply Officer (1). 



We learn things at college, such as readin', 
writin' and 'rithmetic; but most important we form 
friendships that last forever. We meet fellows 
that we learn to admire and respect, fellows that 
serve as models for all the people that we come in 
contact with in later life. Such a fellow is Bill 
Haislip. Bill is admired and respected by every- 
one privileged to call him his friend. He has been 
successful in every field of endeavor that he has 
attempted, and his leadership is best evidenced by 
his military rank. A monogram in track and a 
high academic stand rounds out an almost perfect 
record. His achievements have not affected "Az- 
eley" in the least. He has remained the same un- 
sophisticated country boy that honored us by his 
presence back in September of 1935. Since that 
time he has put Salem, "the town of which Roa- 
noke is a suburb," on the map. If your record 
at the Institute is any indication, we'll be reading 
about you in the near future, "Azeley." Best of 
everything, fellow! and don't forget the "Bro- 
thers of '39." 



m 



li 



h 



m 



Joseph Kelly Half;y, Jr. 

"M,." fir.Ai|.s, Vr«r,.N.A 

Civil EnKinncrins 

1-iilJ Arlillrry 

Piivate (4. 3. 2, 1); A. S. C. E. (2, 1); Horse Show Team II). 



You can't be the strong man of barracks by 
staying in the hay — at least so say the scribes. But 
Jake, even with all his "hay," has made a place for 
himself in the hearts of '39. A sense of humor 
which can't be surpassed, a natural ability for get- 
ting work done, and a genuine smile will make him 
long remembered. 

Stripes have never adorned his sleeves, but this 
doesn't seem to keep him from being a certified 
powerhouse with the women — at least one of them, 
anyway. 

Jake's ability in the barracks' bull sessions is only 
outdone by his dust disturbing activity on the Old 
Mill Road every Wednesday and Saturday after- 
noons. His self-approved furloughs have long 
qualilied him as a charter member of the Two 
Percent Club. 

Haley is an interesting person to know and a 
true friend to have, for behind his friendly smile 
there lies the deep sincerity that one recognizes 
immediately as true Brother Rat spirit! 



William Henry Hastings 

"full" (jjy.itj.»h, Tf.xa« 

VMd ArlilUry 

Private M|; FencinK (4. 3, If, Acadtmic Star* (J. 2. 1»; Cor- 
poral 0|: Battalion SerKeant Major il); Oiairman, Stcond Oim 
Finance Committee II); Busineu ManaK"^. Stcond Oan Show II): 
Junior Wardrn npiscopal Vestry 12); Captain, R«K»n«>ul S } (1); 
Buf-iness Mnnager. Hop Committee l\); Senior Warden, Epi-cp;! 
Ve-.tr>- (1 ) . 

On September 9, 1935, Texas sent one of her 
sons to achieve honors and success at V. M. I. 
And success has been the keynote of his every 
venture here. He was a bit slow in seeking mili- 
tary honors, but during his second class year 
spurted ahead to end up one of the ranking cap- 
tains of the corps. 

As a business man Bill has had no peer; his 
management of the Second Class Finance Com- 
mittee established a financial record unequaled in 
the past. His reputation as a superior swordsman 
led him to the position of captain of the fencing 
team. 

Although taking time out to become a leader 
among the chemists, Bill had ample time to become 
a frequent visitor at the neighboring feminine insti- 
tutions. With the fairer sex Bill definitely believes 
in the old adage — safety in numbers. 

May Bill continue his excellent record in his 
graduate work; our hope is that he might con- 
tribute as much there as he has at \'. M. I. during 
his cadetship. 





John Stanley Higgins, Jr. 

"Johnr.y" East Falls Church, Vn 



Ogden Halsey Hill 

"Pawnee'' "Horse" RoANOKE, Virginia 

Civil Engineering 

Cavalry 



Private (4, 3, 2, 1); Ambassador's Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Acadei 

Stars (3, 2, 1); Riding Club (2, 1); A. L E. E. (2, 1); Expi 

Pistol Dismounted; Marksman, Pistol Mounted; Marksman, Rifle 



It didn't take long for V. M. I. to find out that 
it had a bright man in Johnnie Higgins, for the 
boy from Alexandria soon made his presence known 
in any class. Renowned for his ability to stump 
professors, Johnnie has found his four years at 
V. M. I. easy sailing. 

But academic subjects have never interfered 
with his social inclinations, and few dances in '94 
Hall lacked his presence. Casting an appraising 
eye on all who danced by he was never one to 
pick indiscriminately. 

In the inevitable bull sessions John was not one 
to rant and roar, but when the curt remark, often 
humorous, dropped unexpectedly from somewhere 
in the crowd, it was usually Johnnie who had 
fathered it. 

As he seldom failed to achieve what he went 
after at V. M. I., we know that he will use his 
abilities just as effectively in his career beyond this 
point. 



Private (4, 3, 2, 1); Wrestling (4, 3, 2, 1); Football (4, 3, 2); 
Intramural Wrestling Champion, 1554b. Class (4, 3); Roanoke 
Club (4. 3, 2, 1); Monogram Club (3, 2, 1); A. S. C. E. (2. 1); 
Southern Conference Wrestling Champion, 155-lb. Class (1); O. 
G.'s Association (1), 



In the fall of 1935 a true Southern gentleman 
from nearby Roanoke enrolled at V. M. I. under 
the name, O. Halsey Hill. It was not long before 
his Brother Rats and the old cadets as well real- 
ized that there was a definite personality present 
in barracks. He became better known as "Horse" 
because of his physical strength, which he applied 
to advantage on the wrestling mat and as "Paw- 
nee" because of the slow manner in which he talks. 
He always liked a good bull session and was at 
his best when talking about some "good old Wood- 
berry boy." He has never been much for this "dad- 
burned military," but has been content to be one of 
the boys in the last squad of "C" Company. Slow 
in speech and manner, he did not find easy riding 
as a Civil Engineer, and has worked hard for 
everything he has got. V. M. I. is proud to have 
Halsey, a hard worker, a true friend, a gracious 
host, and a real man, as one of her sons. 



m 



I 



h 



m 



Frederick Alien Hippey 



Civil EnKinetrinR 
Field ArlilUry 



WAI.ff.R RlCHARlJ HOBMTZELL 

■Duirhmun" "Hiiblo" P/uiWAr, New }F.nr.r 

Libtral Art. 

/•ifW ArlilUry 



(4, 3. 2, 1): Roanoke Club (4, 3. 2, 1); A. S. C. E. 
1); Charter Member of Barbaty Coast (1), 



Freddy is a product of Roanoke and a Civil man 
by trade. During his four years here the "Hippo" 
has become one of the brothers of the East Side. 
Although never a strictly military man but a char- 
ter member of privates' row, Fred is always ready 
and willing to do a favor or to lend a helping hand 
when "E" Company is in need. There isn't a more 
conscientious, agreeable chap in barracks, a fact 
that has won Freddy more true friends than he 
perhaps realizes. In academics, he has found no 
reason to become a drudge. Instead he has 
achieved a very creditable record and still found 
plenty of time for the unusual "extra-curricular" 
activities of the Barbary Coast. Always good- 
natured, always a smile and a good word for the 
brothers, we shall never forget his typical "Can I 
bum a weed?" or "Got any reading matter?" We 
understand that Fred has gotten a job with Sears- 
Roebuck; whether they know it or not, they're get- 
ting a fine cadet. 



vate (4. 3. 2, )); Yantee Qub (4, i. 2, 1); Swimming (}, 
U. Monogram Club (3. 2, \); SeTg«anc-at'Arm». Ritbiry 
Com (I); Sean "15" (1) 



"You're just a slave to the system, that's all" — 
this typical remark comes from Hoblo, the Dutch- 
man, our favorite individualist. When the Baron 
came down here from New Jersey four years ago 
he didn't know much about military, and although 
his knowledge is vastly improved, he still feels that 
the whole idea is an imposition on his good nature. 
Hoblo is one of our most ardent "clean-sleevers," 
yet he seems invariably to keep off the P. T. list. 
Give him his hay, Larry Clinton, or preferably 
both, and he's contented, provided that he can dig 
up some V. M. I. inquisition upon which to philos- 
ophize — otherwise, he proceeds to make his own 
fun, which is usually quite unpredictable. Need- 
less to say, he is a Liberal Artist in every sense of 
the word and has even attached a few new conno- 
tations to the term. Among his other achieve- 
ments he has become a mainstay of the swimming 
team in the distance events. Even three syllable 
words and "F" Company policies don't bother 
Dick. He just ignores them in his inimitable, care- 
free way. Prosit! 





Billy Sheridan Holland 



Louis Eugene Hudgins, Jr. 

ixt" Norfolk. Virgii 



3, 2, 1); Football (4. 3. 2, 1); WrcstlmR (4): 
gram Club (2, 1); V. A. S. (2, 1). 



Billy first endeared himself to the hearts of the 
brothers on the first day of the Rat football season 
in 1935 when his 200-odd pounds first went to work 
for V. M. I. 

When "Boxie" came in with the brothers that 
fateful day, V. M. I. was old stuff to him because 
he had made his home in Lexington for some years 
and was therefore a V. M. I. "natural." 

Military glory was never of much interest to Bill, 
and for four years he has trod the weary path of 
the private with complete satisfaction and no end 
of enjoyment. 

As for studies, Billy is a chemist of no mean 
ability. He cast his lot with the Butch after two 
years and is now well read in this field. 

We will long remember this man's skill with 
a barracks bull session, where he always holds his 
own in great style. His imitations in particular 
are priceless and enjoyed by all who hear them. 



Field ArlilUry 

Private (4, 2, 1); Basketball (4, 3); Baseball (4); The Cadet 
Staff (3, 2); Corporal (3); Secretary, V. A. S. (2); Secretary. 
Norfolk Qub (2); Second Class Show (2); Second Class Finance 
Committee (2); Sports Editor. The Cadet (1); President, O. G.'s 
Association (1); President. Norfolk Club 11); Hop Committee (1); 



al Co 



(1); Ho 



Court (I). 



One meeting with this good-looking brunette is 
enough to assure one that he is a top-notcher in 
the ranks of thirty-niners. 

Gene hails from Norfolk, where we understand 
he rates about as much as he does at V. M. L 
He is one of the famous "F" Company First Class 
Privates, a chemist who has made good, and an 
athlete who prefers intramurals to wearing a mon- 
ogram. 

Needless to say. Gene is a lady killer, not just 
an ordinary lady killer but an extraordinary one. 
He wasn't satisfied with the general run of V. M. 
L girls, but he had to go to Hollywood and ask 
Priscilla Lane to be his guest at the premier of 
"Brother Rat" and at opening hops. She accepted. 
We don't know, but he must have sent her his 
picture. But this isn't all. He heads the O. G.'s 
Association, sits on the General Committee and 
Honor Court, and edits the sports page of The 
Cadet. 

We really cannot do justice to Gene in the 
space allotted, but other pages of this book will 
bear his name as proof of his ability. 



m 



I 



h 



m 



James Spindli- Hughes 

Wakurntcin, ViBOf 
Civil RnB,nrcrin« 
I'leld A, nil fry 



■■Miky ■■Dicy 



Rl' MAI'lJ I.rjOAN IHiV 



Ovil Enitin«rinj{ 



(4); Boxing (4); Corporal 13); Polo f3. 2j; Sergeant 
. S. C. E (2, 11; Jumping Team (II; Glee Club (1); 
Lieutenant (1). 



From the "horse-country" of Northern Virginia 
came this long-legged, shy, quick smiling Warren- 
tonian. It was only as it should be that he chose 
the artillery. Blessed by nature with the desire to 
be felt as well as seen, Jim joined Bob LaLance's 
Rat Boxing Squad, thereby earning his numerals. 
Since that time, however, he has devoted his excess 
energies to intramurals — to his company's credit. 
A leaning toward chevrons has led him at last to 
the realm of the "Shavetails." A. C. E. slipstick 
artist of the first magnitude, he has made a name 
for himself as hard-working and conscientious. 

The above tells of his more prosaic qualities 
without describing his personal and human sides. 
To his Brother Rats, Jim has always been cheer- 
ful, ready for trifling, easygoing, fair-minded and 
generous. "J. S.," it's been a distinct and decided 
pleasure to have knocked about with you for four 
years. You've been a credit to your school, your 
class, and yourself; a friend, a pal, a confidant. 



/ate (4): Footb.ill <4, 3. 2, 1); Wrettling /4»i Bawbill (4. }, 
1); Corporal <3); Serjeant (1); A. S. C, E. (2, I); 



Dick is one of those essentially quiet lads, mod- 
est and unassuming, and as a result much of his 
true ability and delightful personality is known 
only to his Brother Rats. Certainly there is noth- 
ing of the "publicity type" about him, but we, his 
friends, know just how much he has put out for 
V. M. I. throughout his four years here. In fact, 
the boys in brown overlooked Dick until his second 
class year. Now, however, he sfwrts a lieutenant's 
chevrons, and remains the same right gent" that 
he was as a private. As an athlete, Dick has cer- 
tainly been more than a moderate success. He 
was a tower of strength on the Rat football team, 
and for the past three years has been one of the 
mainstays of the Varsity at center. In addition, 
he has been outstanding in wrestling in the 175- 
pound class, and for three years has been a mem- 
ber of the Varsity baseball squad. In spite of all 
his athletic activities, he manages to place in the 
upper third of his class academically. Rumor has 
it that in between times he is a "hog" for the gals 
over 'round the Briar Patch! 





William Allen Irving 



"BiU" "IVtU" 



Chester, Pe 



Chemistry 
Infamry 



Herbert Aylwin Jacob, Jr. 

Biuky" "Dr. Yak" Lexingt< 

Chemistry 
lnfM,y 



Private (4); Corporal (3); Swimming (3, 2, 1); First Sergeant 

(2); Second Class Finance Committee (2); Regimental Commandei 

(1); President, First Class; President, Honor Court (II; President 

General Committee ( 1 ) ; Hop Committee ( 1 ) . 



Private (4, 1); Corporal (3); Sergeant (2); V. A. 
Northern Virginia Club (1); O. C.'s Association (1); 
geon of Barbary Coast ( 1 ) . 



In every class that enters the Institute there are 
a few men who are destined to be leaders. Usually 
these individuals are leaders in one particular field 
of activity, rarely in all of them. But in Bill 
Irving we have a leader in almost all the barracks 
activities at V. M. I. For a man to be president 
of his class and first captain was practically un- 
heard of until 1939. Aside from this Bill has suc- 
cessfully captained a swimming team with an en- 
viable record. 

It is not fair to use all the space allotted telling 
what Bill is in the corps. We all know that. But 
it is important for those who are not acquainted 
with him to know what kind of a leader he is and 
just why he is that. It is entirely true to say that 
Bill has achieved his position without any pretense 
whatsoever. He has played no favorites, laid his 
cards on the table, yet made no enemies. Bill is a 
natural, physically and spiritually, and one need 
not feel inferior for not being able to express what 
he has done for '39, and for the corps. 



The first time we saw "Bucky" Jacob, that now 
familiar shuffle was carrying him along the fourth 
stoop to visit the brothers. "Jake" has always 
been one of the more sociable classmates, and has 
never missed a trick as far as "extra-curricular ' 
activities have been concerned. 

In spite of his large number of social activities, 
"Bucky" has found time for more work than is 
necessary, evidence his grades, to make a "dip" in 
the much-feared Department of Chemistry. It is 
said that "Butch" often despaired, but at the final 
accounting our Brother Rat Jacob was always there. 

After progressing as far as sergeant in the mil- 
itary line, "Bucky" finally realized the error of 
his ways and has since devoted his time to the 
pursuit of happiness in the ranks. According to 
all indications he has had no reason for regret. 

It's hard to part company with a man like 
"Bucky," but we know that he has even greater 
things to look forward to in the years to come. 



m 



I 



h 



m 



J 



Fontaine Graham Jarman, Jr. 

••Flash" RoANOKn Rai'Mjs, Nuktm Cakoi.ina 

Pre-Medicil 



Wii.i.iAM Imler Jeffekies 

"IVinnir" Al.tJtA»W.IA, Vl» 

Civil briKinsMinK 



(4); Pistol (4, 3. 2, 1); Baseball (4); Corporal (3); 
ic Stars 13, 2, 1): Sergeant (2); Second Class Finance 
tee (2): Assistant Manager, Football (2); Hop Committee 
;ditorial Staff, Bomb (1); Intramural Manager (1); Lieu- 
tenant ( IJ . 



Here's a real Brother Rat who came up from 
the Tar Heel state to join the class of '39. His 
presence here has added much to barracks life, and 
his four years at V. M. I. can rightfully be termed 
exceptional. 

Flash's accomplishments are many. In the Ca- 
det Corps, he has risen through the grades of cor- 
poral and sergeant and now holds a well-deserved 
lieutenancy in "C" Company. Academic stars, in- 
tramural manager and membership on both the 
Hop Committee and the Second Class Finance 
Committee are a few more of his many distinctions. 
In the social field he is right at home; popularity 
and success have invariably been his in this respect. 

Graham will continue his studies in Medicine 
next fall, but it's a safe bet he'll be back at his 
Alma Mater whenever he can. The future holds 
much promise for this boy since the admirable 
qualities of dependability, thoughtfulness, and sin- 
cerity have made his splendid record here at V. 
M. I. 



Private (4, 2, 1); Football (4, 3. 2); Stccrnd C\u* Show (4, i. 
1); Ambassador Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Episcopal Choir (4, 3, 2»; 
Intramurals (4, 3. 2, 1); Corporal (}); Glee Club (3. 2. I); 
The CaJel Staff (3)-, A. S. C. E. (2. I); Guard of Barbary 
Coast f 1 j . 



Of some few people it can be said, "He is always 
cheerful," and Winnie is one of those select few. 
Through the nightmare days of our Rat and third 
class year, and through the more settled but more 
exhausting periods of our second and first class 
years, Winnie never failed to present a cheerful 
smile. Even with a broken leg in each of the last 
two years he has come through smiling. Encour- 
aging, sympathetic, kindly disposed toward all, he 
has won a vanguard of friends that will last a 
lifetime. 

Winnie's Rat year, like that of most of the 
brothers, was "hard but fair." Finals found him 
possessed of chevrons. Not one to be unduly in- 
fluenced by a false sense of pride, he was still one 
of the boys. A temporary setback occurred at Fi- 
nals when his chevron stock suffered a relapse, 
but his ever present sense of true values saved the 
day. Since that time, Winnie, or Bill as he is 
otherwise known, has put in his time at intramu- 
rals and Civil Engineering. 





John Janney Johnson 

"Snow Plow" Fredericksburg, VIRGI^ 

Chemistry 

Field ArldUry 



John Pegram Johnson, Jr. 



Chemistry 
Field Arntlery 



(4, 3, 2, 1); Football (4); Northern Virginia Club (4, 3, 
2, I); Orchestra (3, 2, 1); V. A. S. (2. 1). 



(4, 1); Track (4, 2); Corporal (3); Sergeant (2); V. 
S. (2 1); O. D.'s Roster (1). 



] 



"Still water runs deep." This old proverb fits 
Snow Plow to the nth degree. A quieter and more 
orderly lad one could never hope to find, but when 
the occasion arises J. J. is right there with the 
goods. There must be a happy little vein of imp- 
ishness way down inside him, for every now and 
then it makes itself apparent in some novel way. 
When this happens, out of a clear sky falls a 
different Snow. 

Snow has made a name for himself as a member 
of the Commanders, and no one tooted a more 
noble saxophone. We all think that he likes the 
girls just a little bit, but J. J. has always been 
rather wary about committing himself on that sub- 
ject. 

Conscientiousness and sincerity are words that 
are too often loosely applied, but they are the only 
ones that could describe Snow Plow. You can't 
down a man that never gives up, and Jack Johnson 
is one that never has and never will. Try as you 
may, O Fate, you'll never get "J. J." down. 



m 



i 



With his natural wit and jovial manner, Pegram 
has made a host of friends at V. M. I. Every 
achievement he has attained has been the result of 
true effort. Chemistry was not easy for him, but 
he saw it through with cheerful perseverance, ex- 
hibiting an amazing faculty for working when 
there was work to be done and playing only when 
the slate was clear. 

Though content to let others occupy the lime- 
light, when the time came he acted with the force- 
ful diligence and the inexhaustible energy which 
are so characteristic of his personality. 

Indicative of the success we may expect of Pe- 
gram in years to come are the firmness of his con- 
victions and his frank and outspoken denunciation 
of the persons and things which do not meet with 
his approval; these combine with his ability to 
make friends and with his earnest conscientiousness 
to form the type of personality one finds in high 
executive positions. 



h 



m 



Waltkk Kkvan Johnson 

•Sco,chk" PKTHI.SI.IJK(.. ViKOINI, 

Chemistry 

l-ulJ Arlillny 



I, II; Intramurals 14, 3 
nd Class Finance Commit 
: (1); Hunt Club (1); 



II; Coiporal (3); Sergeant 
:); V. A. S. (2, I); Hop 
-sburg Club (I); O. D.'s 



Laxjcrence Fike Jones 

WAMIIJiCTOM. D, c. 
Liberal A f 
I'iriJ ArlllUry 



Private f4. 3, 2. I); iip^opal Choji M); Uitte Miriimin (•«); 
MonoKtam Club (3, 2, 1); Rifle Team (3. 1); Swimminfj (}, 2. 
1); Assiitant Manager, Tennis (2); Glee Cub (2. 1); Hpii^opil 
Club 12. IJ; I. A. I.. A. (2, I); Second Oaa Show (2); fre»- 
idcnt, lipitcopal Club H|; A&!iitant Editor, BoMK Mj; Marugxr, 
"D" Company Rifle Team H); l-itlle Symphony M>; fj^ibary 
Coast JuKKernaut of Jive (1|, 



Smiling, good-natured, likable Scotchie! He is 
one of those people whose charm is felt upon first 
acquaintance, whose agreeable personality causes a 
group of friends to gather around him wherever he 
goes. Yet those closest to him know that behind 
his smile, Scotchie has a serious vein and a grim 
determination to master any task that comes his 
way. 

With the ladies, Scotchie has always and will 
always rate at the top, much to the consternation 
of his less fortunate brothers. The girls just can't 
resist that gentle charm which they soon discover 
to be an irresistible magnetism. 

Scotchie has had his share of tough luck at V. 
M. I. Sometimes it has seemed as though Dame 
Fortune had picked him out as the special victim 
for her pranks, yet with that good-natured patience 
and whimsical humor he just smiles and works the 
harder to earn the inevitable victory. Such a man 
is bound to come out at the top of the ladder. 



Shakespeare took him for a boon companion, 
the Glee Club wouldn't let him go, and the swim- 
ming team credited many points to Larry's ability 
in the backstroke. 

His collection of records made 110 the haven 
of those whose solace from classroom and drill 
lay in music. Morning, noon, or night found the 
strains of "The Dipsy Doodle" leaking through 
the cracks in the door, much to the gratification of 
delinquency-hunting subs. 

Camp found Larry consummating his social in- 
clinations, and many are the tales of the rides in 
"Catastrophe," including the two classic ones in 
which "Catastrophe" found itself unable to get 
from Four Corners to Hoyle, and the other one in 
which Len and Larry, the sole occupants, each cer- 
tified to the other that he wasn't driving. 

To one of the stars of the L. A.'s, his Brother 
Rats bid a regretful farewell, and say, "Good luck, 
Larry." 





MisHA Nicholas Kadick 



Liberal Arts 
Field ArnlUry 

Private (4); Corporal (3); Polo (3); Sergeant (21; Second Class 

Show (2): Academic Stars (2); Horse Shoiv Team (1); Battalion 

Adjutant (1). 

Quiet, reserved, and reticent, but none the less 
a leader — this is Misha. Throughout his cadetship 
he has exhibited traits which we have all envied. 
Of Russian descent, he seems to have inherited the 
superior equestrian ability of the Cossacks. It is a 
fine sight to watch him clearing the bars on his 
favorite mount or following the hounds with the 
Hunt Club. Throughout the past year he has 
been an indispensable performer on the horse show 
team. 

But his activity is not confined merely to horse- 
manship; he is an intellectual light as well. In 
the Liberal Arts Department his grades have been 
consistently high, as his academic stars attest; tan- 
gible evidence of his creative ability lies in the sev- 
eral novels which he has written in the past two 
years. 

As a soldier, his lieutenant-adjutant chevrons 
bear witness to his accomplishments; in his sash, 
saber, and plume he is an imposing figure. 

Misha Kadick has shown a devotion to his 
school — an affection that is returned by every mem- 
ber of the corps. 



Herbert Jay Kandel 

Norfolk, Vii 
Chemistry 
Curalry 



Private (4, 2, 1); Academic Stars (4, 2); Wrestling (4, 3, 2, 1); 

Corporal (3); Monogram Club (3, 2, 1); Horse Show Team (1); 

V. A. S. (2, 1); O. G.'s Association (1); Southern Conference 

Wrestling Champion, 121-lb. Class (1). 



Squeege came to us from Norfolk in the fall of 
1935 determined to make a place for himself at 
V. M. I. This he has done, as we all know, and 
at the same time he has made a place for himself 
in the hearts of the brothers of '39 which will not 
soon be vacated. 

Probably the most concise description of Squeege 
is "The Little Man." This expression is true of 
Herby because he is a man in every sense of the 
word, physically, spiritually, and mentally. 

We have seen Herby on the wrestling mat, over 
the test tube, and in the barracks bull sessions; 
in all he has consistently put out. He wears aca- 
demic stars, and is a Southern Conference wrestling 
champion. He is an O. G., and a member of the 
very successful V. M. I. horse show team. 

Herby has been a corporal, a sergeant, and an 
ideal first class private. The importance of the 
good first class private is something that we often 
forget; Squeege did not forget it. 






m 



I 



\> 



m 



Edgar Joseph Kaufman, Jk. 

HUAIMUHU. Vll 



Hugh Am-.xanueh Kekr 

"lldbe" "Kidiht" Miow-muxfi, Wmr,. 

/■'ifW Artillery 



Private (4, 3, 2. 1); V. A. S. (2, 1). 



The term "where there's smoke, there's fire" may 
be apphed to many individuals, but not Ed. We 
mean by this that he is one of the quiet men of 
barracks, but one who has hidden quahties which 
are often unrecognized until close contact is made. 

Ed has been a conscientious chemist since his 
third class year. In this, as in his other activities, 
he has done his work without ostentation. He 
has been a running private in "C" Company, hav- 
ing chosen the cavalry as his unit upon matricula- 
tion. 

Ed lives in Richmond, where he is reputed to 
have an interest aside from horses and test tubes. 
We have tried long and hard to get the scoop on 
this affair, but to no avail. This reticence, we 
feel sure, must indicate something serious. 

We understand Ed is going in the business 
which his family has been in for some years. We 
know that he will be a credit to it. 



(4, 3, 2, 1); Nonhein Virginia Glut (4, J, 2, I); Polo 
I); V, A. S. (2. I); CoSMniiy. Hunt CnmmitUt 111; 



"Kitty" Kerr, "pronounced Carr, I'll have you 
know!" Hugh comes from the horse country, and 
we need only see him ride once to know it. He 
is one of the originators of polo at V. M. I., and 
has been a consistently fine player for three years. 
He chose artillery as his unit, and has been a cog in 
"D" Company activities. He leaves V. M. I. with 
a well-deserved B.S. in chemistry. 

Hugh is small m stature, but his quiet intelli- 
gence and his personality are large factors in his 
make-up. He is popular among the Brother Rats, 
especially those who know him well. In other 
words, he wears well. Nor does his popularity 
stop with his Brother Rats or with his own sex. 

Hugh is another of the quiet boys, not greatly 
impressed by stripes or show of any description, 
qualities which exemplify his composed nature and 
his quiet thoughtfulness. 

We have no worry about Hugh's future. We 
know that whether it be spent in training horses or 
in chemical research he will be making a contribu- 
tion. 





Owen Beall Knight 



Civil Engineering 
Field Andtny 



Yancy Henry Knowles 

■■Ymcc" Mt. Olive, North Ca 

Civil Engineering 
tidd AriilUiy 



Private 14, 3, 2, 1); Piitol Team (4. S, 2, 1); Second Class Shor 

(2, 1); Hunt Club 12, 1); Manager, Pistol Team (1); O. G.' 

Association ( 1 ) . 



Private (4, 2, 1); Football (4); B.seball (4, 3); North Carolina 
Club (4. 3, 2, 1); Intramurals (4. 3, 2. 1); Corporal (3); Sport! 
Staff, The Cadet (2); A. S. C. E. (2. 1); Glee Club (1); Intra- 



"Father, what did you do at V. M. I?" "Why, 
son, I took Butch's 3 A Chemistry course." If 
Smokey ever forgets those summer schools at the 
Institute he will be by himself. Only the good 
nature of Owen Beall Knight could have kept that 
broad grin alive under that biting humor of Butch. 
Never has there lived a more even-tempered man 
than O. B., always the broad grin, never a deroga- 
tory word toward anyone. There could be but 
one result; Smokey was and ever shall be among 
the first in the hearts of the men of '39. With 
his entrance into the second class Smokey elected 
to take Civil. It was a rough road, and the going 
was mighty hard in spots, but the end was well 
worth the effort. The men for whom he will work 
when he has left V. M. I. will sincerely appreciate 
his steadiness and tenacity. They say that the 
bright stars of scholarship fall rapidly into oblivion 
in the cold world. Whatever Beall got out of 
studies he got by hard work; in the end it will be 
this struggle that will carry him to the heights of 
success. 



Yancy did not join us until our first class year, 
but in him we gained a man that any class would 
be prcud to call a Brother Rat. Yancy believed 
in pleasure before business, and spent half his 
time getting in trouble and the other half in serv- 
ing penalty tours. 

After spending one year out of school at hard 
work, Yancy joined the class of '39, astounded 
his professors by making grades that equaled those 
of the brows, and joined the ranks of the H. R. 
boys. 

During the first three years Yancy dated prac- 
tically every pretty girl in Virginia, but in his last 
year we noted a little change. He stopped these 
midnight rides and concentrated all his time on a 
certain young lady in Raleigh, N. C. 

In Yancy we found a true and loyal friend 
who, in both play and work, is bound to succeed, 
for he has shown that he can do both and enjoy 
them. Good luck, Yancy. 



] 



m 



E 



\> 



m 



>> 



Vendel Paul Kovar 

"Bud" FOI'I' CiTV, PliNNSri.VANrA 

Civil En^mc-wmg 

Football (4, 3, 2. I); Baseball (4. J. 2, I); Private (41; Coipatal 
(3); Basketball (41; Intramural Boxmn Champion, I6^lb. Clais 
(3); A S. C, R. (2, 1); Sc-rtjeant (2); O. G/s A^.f.o, laiion II). 

There came from Pennsylvania in the fall of 
1935 a high school athlete who was to become a 
mainstay on the "Fighting Squadron," a hard- 
hitting outfielder, and a running first cla^s private 
in "C" Company. 

Bud is a real sportsman, and we understand he 
spends much of his vacation time in the wilds of 
Minnesota hunting and fishing. He is also agile 
in various kinds of gymnastics, and during cur 
"Rat" year capably served for a while as an in- 
structor in that sport. 

Bud took up Civil Engineering as his course of 
study after his third class year. Here he has been 
consistent, especially in view of the fact that he 
was always representing the Institute in some form 
of athletics. 

Vendel has always been rather reticent about his 
love life, but we understand there is a scoop there 
for somebody who has the interest to investigate it. 

We have Herb Patchin to thank for bringing 
Bud to us, and we take this opportunity to expresj 
our gratitude. 



Charles Mai.col.m Little, Jr. 

■■Mjc" Rioimohl., Vliuil;. 

Libflil Aii< 

Cj»o(/> 



Private (4. 3, 2. )); Baitetball (4); Track (4); Richmond Club 

(4, 3. 2, I); I. A. L. A. (2. I); CliJtMrr Mmibei of Harbziy 

Coiit ( 1 ) ; Putol T«m (I ) . 



"O. K., Buddne, I'll raice you five;" "Come on, 
Harry, let's drop over to the Holl' this afternoon," 
or "1 hink I'll drop up to Silver's V/ednesday and 
order that tweed." Expressions like these indicate 
the presence of Mac Little, Richmond's Little Oil 
heir. But then again, he might be very near us 
and we wouldn't know it, for when he sett.es down 
to work he remains quietly with it until it is fin- 
ished. 

We watched Mac dribble with the bisketeers our 
Rat year, bat saw him desert the courts thereafter 
in order to give more undivided attention to his 
academic pursuits. He did, however, follow up 
his athletic tendencies by participating enthusiast.- 
cally in intramurals. At the conclusion of the in- 
tracompany pistol competition this past fall he was 
found to have qualified for the varsity team. 

Through conscientious effort, for it was not easy 
for him, Mac has received his A.B. degree in Lib- 
eral Arts. Sheepskin in hand, he has waved his 
final good-bye to a host of friends at \'. M. I. 





Jackson Sterling Littrell 



Alan Chatfield Lord 



C.v.l Engineei 



Liberal An 
Cavalry 



] 



Private (4, 1); Basketball (4); Football (4, 3); Baseball (4, 2, 1); 
N. Y. A. (3. 2, 1); Corporal (3); Sergeant (2); Monogram 
Club (2); Second Class Finance Committee (2); Vice-President, 
Yankci Club (2); Hop Committee 111; Business Staff, Bomb (1); 
President. Yankee Club (II; Intramuial Manager, "B" Compan/ 
111; President S. O. T. (1); Guidon Bearer, ■'B" Company 111; 



O. G.' 



Asso 



(1). 



Jackson Sterling Littrell, "Jack," was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts in 1916, and has had the 
upper hand ever since. 

Although his motto through the four years has 
been "All for one — and all for Littrell," Jack has 
gained a great deal of popularity — even with the 
Rebels. 

As president of the S. O. T. Club, Jack upheld 
its standard to the last degree and also proved 
to be one of Ma's favorite sons. His ability to take 
life easy and yet come out with very good grades 
in his academic work amazed his classmates. Jack 
says that a Yankee doesn't have to study to leave 
these thick Rebels in the dust. 

His forward manner taxed the instructors' abil- 
ity to overlook actions and remarks in the class- 
room. The gray walls will long ring with Jack's 
thunderous voice yelling, "Settle down in the court- 
yard, I wanta sleep." 



Private (4, 2, 1); Football (4); Yankee Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Wrest- 
ling (4); Floating University (4. 3); Corporal (3); I. A. L. A. (2. 
1); Glee Club (1); O. G.'s Association (1). 



When Al Lord turned southward four years 
ago he was resolved to put all of his energies to 
doing his best at V. M. L, and his Brother Rats 
will attest to the fact that this is just what he has 
done. Born with a taste for literature, Al had to 
endure the rigors of math, physics, chemistry, and 
other horrors. Finally, he reached the Promised 
Land and entered the Liberal Arts Department 
with a copy of the Forsyte Saga clutched firmly in 
his left hand. 

In the field of athletics, both the Rat football 
and wrestling teams saw him doing or dying daily, 
and in the latter he lost twenty-five pounds in two 
weeks. Fastidious and neat, his uniform has been 
the wonder of all privates, and social activities have 
found Al cutting in on the best that surrounding 
schools had to offer. To one of their most con- 
scientious and lovable Brother Rats, '39 wishes the 
success that will inevitably crown Al's tradition- 
ally sincere efforts in any endeavor that he might 
undertake. 



m 



I 



\> 



m 



^ 



John Allan Love, Jr. 



(4): 



Riflt Team (4, 3. 2, 1); Academic Stars (4, 3. 2. 1); 1 
Corporal (3); Sergeant (2); Tyrant of Tran.sportati< 
Coast 12. 1); Intramural Council (1); Intramural Manager (1) 
O. G.'s Asrociation (I); Editorial Staff. The BoMIi (I). 



It didn't take '39 long to recognize the fact that 
in Jack Love they had a man with abiHties in 
bosks, baseball, and cards. After a few months 
all other aspirants to the honor of being the top- 
stand man scholastically gave up in despair, and 
for four years have watched Jack carry away all 
academic honors. Jack has also displayed an abil- 
ity at cards, however, that has been not only amaz- 
ing but devastating, and like Napoleon he is cred- 
ited by his roommates with being able to carry on 
two conversations, coach his more unfortunate bro- 
thers, read a book, and study a lesson at the same 
time. 

In the field of athletics Jack led "E" Company 
as Intramural Manager and pitched its baseball 
team to many victories. His steady nerves and 
keen eye earned him a position on the rifle team, 
and his writing abilities the position of Associate 
Editor of the Bomb. The most brilliant of the 
brothers. Jack will long be affectionately remem- 
bered for his generous nature and his all-around 
abilities. 



JaMKS ShL/.BY MAr,C);MN 

"Col" Ijfif.ii-vcx^j, MiWf*tv/rA 

Civil Enfp'neerinK 

Private f4); Yanlrec Club f4, }. 2, I); Pr.tol Ttam 14, i, 2. 1); 

Boxing (4, 3); Rifle Tern (4, J); Co:poral I}); Football (i. 2. I): 

Supply Serjeant (2); Pretidenr, Mlnn«v>ta Club t2t: ^ict-Pmi- 

dent, S. O. T. Club (1); l.r.oi<-nani (I). 

One day when his deer hunting brought him too 
far south to return to the wigwam, "Cot" saw a 
"castellated, military gothic structure situated on a 
high plateau" and decided to set his traps around 
there for a while. After he learned that a turn- 
out was not the signal for a war-dance, he quickly 
settled down to familiarize himself with the pale- 
face's ways. A military leaning, coupled with the 
fine figure he cut in a uniform, won him the chev- 
rons of a corporal, a supply sergeant, and a lieu- 
tenant; his Bunyan-like physique and a love of 
the rough-and-tumble found him a constant mem- 
ber of the football squad. 

We suppose because a tripod remotely resem- 
bles the structure of a wigwam, "Cot" eagerly and 
unhesitatingly took to the transit, the stadia, and 
the level when he chose his course. In the C. E. 
Department he has kept up with the best of his 
fellow engineers. 

His wild tales of the wildwoods caused much 
comment (and doubt) in bull sessions, but many 
were the rabbits and quail that fell before his 
marksmanship. "Cot" carries back to the tepee a 
place in the hearts of all his Brother Rats, and to 
him all we can say is "Happy Hunting." 





William Lowry Major 

Clifton For 
Civil Engincrring 
Field Artillery 



Lawrence Grant Mathews 



Private (4, 2, 1); Corporal (3); A. S. C. E. (2, 1). 



Persistence is a synonym for "Billy, the Kid." 
This quality has been outstanding in Bill during 
his entire cadetship at V. M. I. His dogged pur- 
suit of knowledge has netted him marks, which, 
although not of honor list calibre, were sufficiently 
good to be the envy of many of his Brother Rat3. 

The Kid's military aspirations received a setback 
at make-overs his third class year. While this was 
a terrible blow, he recovered in time to fully enjoy 
the happy-go-lucky life of a private. 

When Billy left Clifton Forge in September, 
1935, to enter V. M. I., he left a girl behind him. 
Through four long years he has remained faithful. 
When the temptations offered by neighboring girls' 
schools are considered, this becomes a really great 
accomplishment and is excellent testimony to his 
strength of character. 

Now, at the end of his incarceration, "Squat" 
deserves his parole, for he has served long and 
faithfully and he leaves V. M. I. with nothing but 
the best of wishes from everyone who knows him. 



^mg (4); Corporal (3); Swimming (3); Track 
ant 12); Glee Club (2. 1); V. A. S. (2, 1); 
:5S Staff, Bomb (1); Lieutenant (1). 



The story of Larry's career at V. M. L has been 
a remarkable one. Although not endowed with 
chevrons until late in his third class year and again 
at make-overs his second class year, he has kept 
i:hem ever since. It seems that his one principal 
aim has been to make life for all of those who 
knew him richer and more enjoyable, and it can 
be truthfully said that in parting from his many 
friends, he will leave an empty spot that will be 
hard to fill. 

Larry stands quite high in the course of his 
choice, but he has never been known to study so 
hard that he would not drop his book to trifle a 
bit. In fact, he joins with roommates Bond and 
Haislip to make one of the most renowned trifle 
teams in barracks. His Arkansas drawl, genial 
smile, and good looks have placed him in the ranki 
of the Don Juans. 

It is with sorrow in our hearts, Larry, that we 
bid you a final adieu. You've been a lovable 
friend and a true Brother Rat, and we feel confi- 
dent you will enjoy the same success in life that 
you have in barracks. 



] 



m 



I 



h 



m 



Earle Campbell Maxwell 

••White Hon," Rk.iimond, Vri 

ChrmiMiy 



(4. 3, 2, 1); Richmond Cluti (4. 3, :. I); Football (4 1; 
S. (2. 1); Keeper of the Royal Arabian Studb, Barbary 
CoaM ( 1) . 



On the 9th of September, 1935, "White Horse" 
set out grimly from the Seven Hills of Richmond 
and crossed the Blue Ridge Mountains "to press 
up the hill of science" at V. M. I. "The Horse" 
has achieved his purpose, because he has labored 
diligently in analyzing the Butch's numerous chem- 
ical problems. 

At the end of our Rat year Campbell was in line 
for a high-ranking corporal, but he discovered that 
his military aspirations and academics would not 
harmonize. Although he has been a private for 
four years he has rejoiced over being one of the 
boys and residing on the Barbary Coast. 

"White Horse" has not altogether limited his 
career to barracks life, because he has also taken 
an interest in the opposite sex and vice versa. Al- 
though he is a "powerhouse" with the women his 
thoughts for them do not go beyond his affections 
for the little girl in North Carolina. 

In closing, "Horse," we hope that you and the 
one and only will be as happy in the future with 
each other as we have been these years with you. 



William Hoilaoay Mf.CAffTHy 

•■Hilly" ■•M^c- RloiMONt., VllUJIWIA 



Piivaie M. I); I:pmrpal Vmty 14. 3, 2. I); Epixopal Owii 14. 
3. 21: N. Y, A. (4. 3); Out Agent <). If. Corpofil (}); S«. 
rotary. Richmond Club (3); Sergrrant i2); Second CUm Firun£c 
Committee (2); Vice Prejident, Glee Club (2); Audemic Start (2); 
1 A. L. A, (2, 1); Richmond Club (2, \); Hop Committee l\); 
librurian, Glee Club (1); Preiident, Th, Lrctrrn (I); Editor. 
Bi MB (1): O. D.5 Ro5ter (1). 



Billy McCarthy has given so much to V. M. I., 
his interests have been so varied, and his position 
in the corps so prominent, that it is really difficult 
to do him justice here. This very book has been 
made possible by his artistic sense and capable ed- 
itorship, and only those who have worked with him 
can know the months of hard and steady work that 
he has put on it. 

The list of Billy's material accomplishments as 
a cadet is above, but this alone could not acquaint 
one with the man whom we have known as Brother 
Rat. Billy's well-rounded intelligence, his unbiased 
opinions, his constructive ideas, combined with the 
force necessary to put them across will never b: 
forgotten by those so fortunate as to be closely 
acquainted with him. Billy, however, is far from 
a dull, plodding worker, and the pleasure of his 
cheerful company is known to all. 

Billy, indeed, is the kind of boy who makes a 
lump come to one's throat when one hears Auld 
Lang Syne. 





Wellington Saunders McMann 



James Lawrence Meem, Jr. 



Pre-Medical 
Field Artillery 



Field Artillery 



(4. 3, 2, 1); Gym Team (4, 3, 2); Winner Ira 
Gymnastic Cup (2); O. G/s Association (1) 



(4, 2, l); Academic Stars (3, 

Boxing (4); Corporal (3); V. 

Association ( I 



1); Intramurals (4, 3, 
. S. (2, 1); O. G.'s 



] 



Mac, as he is affectionately named by his friends, 
which are legion in barracks, has only been with 
us for two years, but in that time he has endeared 
himself to all by his cheery good nature and his 
willingness to help a friend. 

Possibly the best informed man in barracks by 
reason of his duties as Commandant's orderly, Mac 
has always been ready to explain the mysteries of 
the latest general order to the less informed. 

Luscious odors floating silently on the chill night 
air would have led us to 162 where Mac held sway 
as a chief cook and bartender of no mean skill. 

Though a true man of the world, Mac since a 
certain event last year, has decided his "heart be- 
longs to daddy," and has resisted all feminine on- 
slaughts. 

Wellington is undecided whether to emulate his 
namesake and join the army, or to become a doc- 
tor. Whichever he does, we are sure that his cheer- 
fulness, tact, and ability will carry him as far as 
he desires. 



m 



li 



From deep in the Shenandoah Valley came this 
son of V. M. L, already instilled with a love for 
the honor and traditions of the Institute and 
anxious for the opportunity to perpetuate the dis- 
tinguished record established by his forefathers at 
this school. At the beginning of his third class 
year Lawrence was proudly exhibiting a corporal's 
chevrons and firmly clutching academic stars. The 
latter he has held for four years, symbolic of a 
scholastic record that has gained him the honored 
and revered appelation of "Brow." With the pa- 
tience of Job and the heartfelt interest of a true 
Brother Rat he has always taken gladly from his 
time to help his less gifted classmates over the 
difficult hurdles in his chosen field of chemistry. 
Larry's ability, industry, and seriousness of purpose 
form a combination that has won him honor at V. 
M. L and which will insure him the highest 
achievements in the years to come. As a Brother 
Rat we shall remember him for those virtues which 
make friendship a hallowed memory. 



\> 



m 



$ 



Langhorne Hutter Meem 

"Snag"' •■Uns" Hi.ui-MKi.r), Wi.sr Vijioinia 

Civil EriKintorinK 

ArliUcry 

Football (4, 3, 2, 1): Wrestlmg (4); Swimming (3. 2. 1): 

Corporal (3); A. S. C. E. (2, I); Sergeant 12); Second Class 

Finance Committee (2); Monogram Club (1): Hop Committee 

(l)i Club "121. ■■ 

For four years now we have watched Snag 
Meem excel in V. M. I. athletics, perform ably his 
duties in the several class organizations, win his 
Dip. in the Civil Engineering Department, gain his 
share of chevrons, entertain with his unique wit, 
and have his turn at courting on the Sweetbriar 
campus. We have watched with awe and amuse- 
ment. 

All of us are proud of our home towns, and 
Snag has done his bit of rooting for dear old 
Bluefield. He has always been able to go us one 
better when the bull session lapses into the "now- 
in-my-home-town" stage. 

In contrast to his comical antics, Lang is gifted 
with great ease and grace of bodily movement; as 
a diver he has scored often for the swimming team, 
thrilling the spectators with his skillful manipula- 
tion of many difficult twists and turns. 

As one who is able to get a lot of fun out of 
life without sacrificing success in the more serious 
pursuits. Snag is looked up to by his Brother Rats 
as a model. Few have been as successful as he. 



Raymond Ring Messick 

-llUtk Mjy,ic" ■■Otry tJotr'- P.OAMOIE, VlBCIMIA 

Chtmiitry 
lnf,m,y 



M, 3, 2, I); Football (4. 3, 2, 1); fozruAt Club (4. 
3 2. I). 



Roanoke has supplied V. M. I. with a great 
many men, but never one as unique as "Okey- 
Doke." Little did V. M. L know what it was in 
for when he was turned loose upon it. Though 
not a member of '39, '38 lost a Brother Rat and 
'39 gained a friend when he failed to return last 
year. 

Many are the bull sessions that have centered 
around his experiences, true and otherwise, dealing 
with the fair sex and his "run-ins" with "Butch" 
and "Less." 

His reaming of Beard in their financial deals 
and their "Camp Car," which was never around 
when Beard wanted it, was of great amusement to 
his Brother Rats. Beard's most used expression in 
camp was "where in the hell is Prince and my 
half of the car?" It must also be mentioned that 
Ray's nicknames were many, because they changed 
with the winds. 

His ability to take academic knocks wuth a smile 
and come back to m.ake good have earned him a 
place in the esteem of our class. 





William Wylie Middleton, Jr. 

•Stormy Mount Jackson, Virgu 

C.v.l Enginrermg 

Field ArtilUry 



William Carroll Mitchell, Jr. 

Iilly" "Much" Norfolk, 

Electrical Engineering 
Cayilry 



Private (4, 3, 2, 1); A. S. C. E. C, 1); Hunt Club (2, 1) , 



"W-Square" has many nicknames, and they are 
all complimentary. 

Billy is one of the younger members of the class, 
but he is by no means the weakest. His chest de- 
velopment resembles Charles Atlas", and all one 
need do to test his strength is to challenge him to 
a wrestling match. But this strength is never used 
unfairly, because it's practically impossible for Billy 
to become angry. He is the continual possessor of 
a genial smile and is ever ready for the fun. He 
is by no means a "playboy," however, as evidenced 
by his steadily improving record, the result of a 
willingness to work. 

On entering V. M. I. Billy chose the artillery 
as his unit. He is a first class private and one of 
the best of them. The ostentation of stripes does 
not intrigue him. He is also one of Buzz's boys. 

We know that Billy's quiet charm, his sense of 
humor, and his undeniable ability to get along with 
all kinds of people will carry him safely through 
any difficulty he may encounter. 



als (4, 3, 2, 1); Private (4, 1); Corporal (3); Sergeai 
(2); Second Class Finance Committee (2); Electrician, Second Cla 
Show (2); Varsity Rifle (2, 1); A. I. E. E. (2, 1); Painter 
Association (2, 1); Barracks Electrician (1); Hop Con 



(I). 



'Focus!" "Frame it!" Amid these yells our 
projection-room Lothario went to work. During 
every shirt-tail parade while the barracks boys 
would be whooping it up, poor Mitch was pulling 
his hair, thinking of the many stoop-lights to be 
replaced — the price he paid for being barracks 
electrician. 

Academically Billy was right up front with the 
best of the "brows," never a wearer of the "gold 
star," but always up on top of the list. 

For reasons we have never been able to figure 
cut, Mitch has always picked the small type of 
girl, probably, to quote this slaphappy Casanova, 
becaure "I can handle little women." As carefree 
as they come, this chalk-and-eraser-thrower supreme 
has never had a worry, going his way in the easiest 
of style, overcoming obstacles as he met them, al- 
ways saving plenty of time for his dearest com- 
panion — his hay. We'll always miss his pleasing 
personality and genial friendship. 



] 



m 



I 



h 



m 



Alexander HErJDERSON Morrison 



(4); 


Co 


rpora 


(3) 


.ibcia 
/„/„ 

Edit 


Art 
riny 

orial 


St 


ff. Ih 


.• CmIc: 


(3, 


2) 


12) 


Sc 


cond 


Class 


Show 


(21; 


I. 


A. L. 


A. (2, 


1); 


Aca 


tars 


2, 


1); Second 


Class 


Fin a 


ncc 


Comm 


ttcc (2) 


i Bu 


sines 


HIi B 


OMB 


(1 1 


Lieu 


cnant 


( 1 1 


lir 


iscopal 


Supper 


Club 


( 1) 




Ho 


D Co 


mmittcc (1) 


; Tl, 


• 1- 


1 (.•,;! 


1 ). 







Because of his modesty, few of us know that 
Alexander Henderson Morri£3n's great-grandfa- 
ther was General Smith, the founder of V. M. I.; 
yet in him are reflected the traits of his distin- 
guished ancestor — high ideals, outstanding intellect, 
feeling for religion, and boundless enthusiasm. 
Alexander Morrison typifies our idea of a South- 
ern gentleman. 

Bee's sense of humor is notorious. Many a time 
one of us has found himself walking around with 
his hat seal unaccountably upside down. Such 
puckish pranks can be traced to one source — Mor- 
rison. 

In spite of the fact that he has worn stars and 
stripes consistently. Alec has found plenty of time 
for the fair sex. Goshen Pass knows him well as a 
lover. 

Morrison has a distinct flare for business. His 
picture enterprise has been quite profitable. He 
deserves an orchid from the class for the splendid 
job he did in handling the flowers for the S. C. 
F. C. 

Next year Morrison will be a sub. We know 
that the brown coat will fit Alec's shoulders, for 
his record is one of which even "Old Specs" would 
be proud! 



Thomas Addis Em.met MosF.i.F.y, Jr. 

"Cap" "7" l.f.xtjicroii, Wttatntfi 

Fre Mfdicjl 



! 14): Class Artist 14. }, 2. I); Corporal (J); FJoor Co<n- 
(4, 3, 2); Assistant ManaKcr, Football ti); Fifit Strgfexnt 
Second Class Finance Committet (2); Academic Star. <2)-. 
, S. (2. 1); Captain (1); Art Editor, TllE BoMB 111: 
Hop Committee t I ) . 



The Michelangelo of '39 was, unlike most of 
us, prepared for the rigors of military life. Re- 
gardless of the fact that he lives on the post, 
Tom-Tcm has been confined to these barracks ts 
clocely as anyone. Any of the brothers will con- 
firm the fact that he could be seen giving vent to 
his restlesrness by prowling about the stoops while 
calmer souls slumbered. Stripes have not damp- 
ened his love for a frolic, for he has had a private's 
share of escapades. Cap was genuine in his work 
as well as in play, and his rank is fair evidence that 
he has put out when the situation demanded. 

His academic stars have not prevented him from 
carrying on a voluminous correspondence, making 
and breaking romances with abandon at various 
institutions of feminine learning. His academic 
ability promises fair to make him a first-class "Man 
m White." 

We could never forget Tom, but we shall carry 
a tangible evidence of him throughout our lives in 
our most beloved possession, the class ring that is 
his work. 





Earl Cecil Moses, Jr. 



Liberal Art 



Private (4); Corporal (3); Track (3, 2, 1); Rifle ,_ . _,, __ 
'-~ •■ I Club (2, 1); Senior Intramural Manager (1); 



(2); Monogram ^...^ ^^, xy, ^. 
( 1 ) ; Chief Judge Adv 



(3. 2); Se, 
Vlanager 
rbary Coast ( 1 ) . 



Jake moved into V. M. I. about a month late 
our Rat year, but that didn't seem to bother this 
boy from Kansas — neither did the fact that "B" 
Company forgot to give him a corporal. He 
merely rose above it, and no one is surprised to see 
him with stripes now — except perhaps the Hose- 
Nose-Mose himself. If you ever want to know 
anything, just ask Jake and he'll tell you, perhaps 
wrongly, but very positively, and will undoubtedly 
keep you in stitches throughout the explanation. 
Academically, Mo is somewhat flighty, but he has 
a grand time. Any time you really want to find 
him try the P. E. or the poker game, and there 
he'll be matching witticisms with Hari-Kari Diggs. 
Unaccountably the girls have a decided yen for our 
Kansas prodigy and he's always powerhousing some 
"certified" number. Incidentally he hurdles after 
a fashion and takes his track monogram in his 
stride. A carefree Liberal Artist, Jake's only 
chronic kick is the wheat crop back home. 
Wherever there is something doing, there'll be Mo. 



Charles Nelson, Jr. 

■■H„p" Nashvi 

Civil Engineering 



■ate (4, 3, 2, 1); A. S. C. t. (2); Assistant Manager, Wri 
Img (2); Manager, Varsity Wrestling (1); Glee Club (1). 



Charles Nelson, Jr., is a Tennessee boy who is 
especially interested in wrestling. He made such 
an efficient assistant manager of the wrestling team 
that he was appointed to be manager. In that ca- 
pacity he has skillfully handled a difficult job. 
That "Shnoz" himself is a grappler of no mean 
ability was demonstrated on the Glee Club trip to 
Richmond. 

Charles is usually a rather quiet boy, and there 
have been few women in his life, yet it doesn't take 
much to bring him out of his shell. For example, 
he really loves to argue! His ability in this direc- 
tion should help him in law school. 

Every finals since his Rat year, "Shnoz" has 
sworn that he wouldn't come back to V. M. I.; 
however, when school started the next fall, he was 
always one of the first to be back. We have come 
to know that under his bluff Charles has a deep 
and sincere affection for V. M. I. 

That all his classmates have an affection for the 
"Shnoz" is a clear indication as to the quality of 
his personal characteristics. To them all he is a 
firm friend and a true Brother Rat. 



m 



I 



h 



m 



James Blakev Newman, II 

"}immy" I.M TLB Koi.k, Aiikansas 

Electrical HnKineering 



KoiitM WiM.iAMSoN Nix, III 

"Dob" WAlkHHjklj, Vl»ol»IA 

Oiemi'.try 



Piivate (4. i. 2, 1 ) 1 A. I. E. E. (2, 1); Academic Stars 12, 1). 

"Newman, J. B., Sir," and the Class of 1939 
was blessed with its own and inimitable academic 
brow. Jimmy is one who proceeds upon his own 
way, minds his own business, and only comes into 
prominence when his Brother Rats discover cracker 
crumbs in their hats, or salt in their coffee. 

Early in his career, "Stormy" cast aside all mil- 
itary aspirations, and devoted his time to the books. 
Jimmy, a natural "brow," took easily to E. E., and 
has kept the stars shining on his battered old 
blouse. 

No one knows the innermost thoughts, or the 
ultimate ambitions of "C" Company's blond ter- 
ror, but a constant grin and unwavering eye-twinkle 
shall always give warning of unexpected and drastic 
action soon to follow. 

So, Jimmy, when you go your way, you can rest 
assured that it will not be unnoticed. Your friends, 
and there are many of them, will always know 
when you are near, but, what is more important, 
they will know the more when you are not among 
them. 



P.ivatc ri, J, 2, I); V A. S. (2. I); Marlutnan. Pr.tol Du- 
mounted (2>; Little Symphony Orchescra Hj. 



Bob is an "army brat," and we feel that he 
must have received some early training, because he 
is one of the ablest command shouters among the 
"pebble pushers." Robert is a private in "B" Com- 
pany, chiefly because he did not wish to put him- 
self into the limelight; when called upon, however, 
he always produced. 

Bob has chosen the infantry as his unit and 
chemistry as his course. He is a student of the 
first order, consistent and willing in his work. 

He also has interests in music, not so much 
"swing and sway," but the real thing. He is a 
member of Billy's little symphony orchestra. 

We have not heard a great deal of Bob's love 
life, but we know there must be something there, 
because such a quiet and attractive cadet must have 
made an impression on the fair sex. He certainly 
has on his Brother Rats. 

We know that Bob Nix will make his way in 
life regardless of what may face him, because when 
he is given a task to do, it is done well. 





Irving Vallandingham Parham, Jr. 

Petersburg, Vii 
Chemistry 
Field Arnllcy 



Frank Morgan Parker, Jr. 

Chambersburg. Pen 
Electrical Engineering 



itc (4, 3. 2, 1); Polo Squad (3, 2); Hunt Club (2. 1); 
nd Class Finance Committee (2); V. A. S. (2, 1); Hop Com- 
mittee (1); Petersburg Club (1); Manager, Polo (1). 



Here is a man who has got much from V. M. I. 
in various and sundry ways. Val enjoys a good 
time, and V. M. I. regulations have not greatly 
interfered with his having it. He has been a fre- 
quent visitor with the "Minks," and he is well- 
known in the various girls' schools in the vicinity. 
At the same time, Val has lived a well-rounded 
life in barracks. He has been a competent stu- 
dent in the Chemistry Department, has served on 
the Second Class Finance Committee and the Hop 
Committee, and has been an efficient O. G. Val 
has an inherent love for horses and riding, and has 
been a member of the polo squad and the V. M. I. 
hunt club 

A man of fixed principles and of superior intel- 
lect, Val is usually ready for a bull session, and he 
always has some good ideas to contribute. 

We understand that I. Val. will go with Du- 
Pont after June 14. We know that his confidence 
and ability will enable him to make a creditable 
place for himself there. 






m 



I 



■ate (4, 3. 1); Academic Stars (3, 2. 1); Second Class 
3, 2); Sergeant (2); Treasurer of S. O. T. Club (2 
'iceChairman, A. I. E. E. (2, 1); O. G. s Association 1 



Who was it that said "I don't see how he can 
make stars and still raise so much cain?" Who- 
ever it was, he certainly must have been referring 
to Parker, because in the four years at the Institute 
Frank's actions (particularly at Roanoke) have 
been told and retold; yet, his name has appeared 
on the Honor Roll with disgusting regularity. 

Frank was never a "brow," but hard, earnest 
work coupled with a world of good common sense 
and never-failing logic consistently placed him in 
that sidereal space above 9.0; and that same com- 
mon sense, plus a warm heart and cheerful gener- 
osity endeared him to all of his Brother Rats. He 
took chevrons as he took everything else — in his 
stride. For three years he ably dodged feminine 
wiles, falling at last before the guns of a Yankee 
Siren who was a little too quick on the draw. 

Witty, warm-hearted, generous and hard-work- 
ing — those are the qualifications with which Frank 
will face the cruel world; we envy the people with 
whom he will associate, for their gain is our great 
loss. 



h 



m 



John Pasco, Jr. 

"Cirn/ifi/" KALiiidi, Nourri C> 

Pif Mfdical 



Carolina Club (4, J, 2. 1); Hiivatc (4); Football (4); Coipjral 
(3); Setgeant (2); Business Staff, I lit CjJ,l {2); AisiMant Man 
agcr, Basketball (2); Second Class Play (2); V. A. S. 12, 1); 
Circulation Manager, I he CjJa l\); O, G.'s Association (1). 



"Red Dog" to his roommates, "Certified ' to his 
fraternal pre-meds, and just plain John to the rest, 
Pasco has that en\/iable faculty of being a friend 
to all, enemy to none. His broad smile and radiant 
countenance are capable of lifting the gloom from 
the mo.t discouraging situations; his generosity and 
his willingness to help are gratifying. 

Cupid's side of our story reveals a veritable Don 
Juan; concentrating his affections upon no one girl 
in particular, John finds great sport in having col- 
umns of them tag along behind him. The morn- 
ing mail never fails to bear fruit for him, and the 
variety is always great. Withal, he is ever faithful 
to the Tar Heels and the Floridians, seldom allow- 
ing his amorous attentions to depart from their 
ranks. 

With his array of humanitarian tendencies and 
with his remarkable congeniality, we are not sur- 
prised to find John preparing himself for the med- 
ical profession. 



John Kirkpatrick Phf.oLES 

"PtJlent" NaSHVILI,!;, TEtittfJUr.B 

Civil EnKintenng 

lirU ArltlUf) 

Private (4, 2, I); Coiporal (3); A. S. C. E. (2, 1); Amuuiu 
Manager, reiinii (2); Manager, Tennis (l|;,Buiin«< Staff, Boue 

John Kirkpatrick Peebles is one of several boys 
who came to V. M. I. from Nashville, Tennessee. 
At first he had ambitious ideas concerning his mil- 
itary future, but after a fling at being a corporal, 
he settled down to become one of the select cliqu; 
of first class privates who worked so hard to keep 
"F" Company in the lead. Particularly has he 
been active in intramural soft ball as catcher for 
his team. 

"Potent" is a quiet, unassuming boy who gets 
en well with everyone. It was this ability to make 
friends that won him the managership of the ten- 
nis team. In spite of that exacting duty and be- 
ing on the business staff of the Bomb, "Potent" 
has pulled his grades up ever since his Rat year to 
a point where he has frequently made the Honor 
Roll. 

Johnny is mighty lucky and seems to bear a 
charmed life — he has been going with the same girl 
for four years and wasn't even scratched when the 
car m which he was riding turned over six times.' 
Here's hoping Lady Luck will continue to sit on 
his shoulder, for "Potent " is one swell fellow. 





Gorman Quinn 




Reuben Ragland, Jr. 




Ardmore, Pennsvlvani 


^ "Rube" 


Jackso 


■jviLLE, Florida 


Chemistry 




Electrical Engineering 




ela ArnlUry 




Field ATCillcTy 





Private (4, 3, 2, 1); Fencing Team (4, 3, 2); Rifle (4. 3, 2, 1); 

Gym Team (4, 3, 2. 1); Glee Club (1); Astronomy Club (1); 

O. G 's Association (1). 



Here is the busiest hobbyist in the first class; 
photography, rifle collecting, archery, and astron- 
omy are only a few of his extra-curricular activities. 
Aside from these Bill was on the gym team, a 
cheerleader for two years, on the fencing team, and 
participated to a large extent in intramurals. With 
all this outside work he consistently made the 
Honor Roll, missing academic stars by a very nar- 
row margin. In his spare time Bill mastered the 
guitar with which he accompanied his inexhaust- 
ible supply of ballads. At camp the job of bugler 
fell to Beepo, a job which he filled well, allowing 
the boys to sleep overtime on only one morning. 
In barracks his good humor and ready wit soon 
won him coveted place in the esteem of his Brother 
Rats. 

Bill selected the chemistry course at the end of 
his third class year. This presented larger fields 
of endeavor for his inquisitive mind and led to 
even more dabbling through a greater access to the 
labs. Life could never be dull or unsuccessful to 
one with Bill's ability and interests. 



Private (4, 1); Cross-Country (4); Intramurals (4, 3. 2, 1): Pistol 

(4, 3, 1); Episcopal Choir (4); Academic Stars (3); Corporal (3); 

Sergeant 12); A. I. E. E. (2, 1); Rifle Team (1); O. G.'s 

Associaticr (I ) . 



Military routine and life in these rugged hills of 
old Virginny has not changed the good-natured 
disposition of Rube, who forsook the sunny shores 
of Florida to further his education and experience. 

Glancing back over his four years at V. M. I. 
we see that his dreams have become realities. Aca- 
demic stars, chevrons, and week-end rendezvous 
embody these dreams. Rube's cadetship has not 
been all victory. He has had his ups and downs. 
Losing both stars and chevrons at the end of his 
second class year. Rube joined the happy carefree 
ranks of the masses. 

Any brief summary of his life here would be 
incomplete unless mention was made of the postal 
situation. Letters from all parts of the country 
distinguished him from the average man, even after 
the O. A. O. came along. All those desiring in- 
struction in the art of writing love letters were sure 
to find all types in R. R.'s collection. 

Your life at V. M. I., Rube, predicts a happy 
future. 



] 



m 



I 



h 



m 



Wll.f.lS SmIIH RlDIJIf.K 



I ); Gym Tc-am (4. 3. 2, 1 ); Wi, 
nui.il Coum-,1 (1); Pistol Ttam (I ). 



It didn't take Willie Roe, the Pride of the 
Peanut Country, long to make a name for himself 
in barracks. A well-balanced mixture of serious 
concentration when working and happy-go-lucky 
cheerfulness when playing have made Willis a good 
student and a fine friend. 

For four years he has been a stand-by on the 
gym team, and climaxed his efforts by captaining 
the team his first class year. No intramural man- 
ager has worked harder than Willis, and "F" Com- 
pany supremacy in the field of athletics attest to 
the success of his efforts. 

Bull sessions bring out the best in many men, 
and Willie has been a shining example of mastery 
of the art, whether the field has been any of the 
four stoops of barracks or the famed N. C. O.'s 
Club of Fort Hoyle fame. 

Although his abilities of leadership went unrec- 
ognized when military honors were given out, he 
found other fields, and his first class year saw 
him an honored member of the Intramural Coun- 
cil. He has lived a well balanced four years. 



F-'ATKlf.K Wl/.I.IAMS RnjlJl.l-.lil-.Hf.hU 

"Pjt" "I'rtin," WfX^l/srrj/.r. Vf«/>I]<IA 

I.lbnil An. 

Inj^nlry 



Private (4); Track (4, 3, 2); Optaln, Trjck (4); CUu, Hii 
(4. 3. 2. \); Intramurali (4, 3. 2. 1); N, Y, A. (4, }. 2); 
Genera! Committee (3, 2. I J; Corporal (3>; SerK«ant t2}; Honor 
Court 12. I); I. A. I,. A. (2, I); Second On. Finantt Com- 
mittee 12); Bomb .Staff (1); Captain 11); EpiKopal Votr^ (i); 
Hop Committee il;; Ihe Lectern ilf; Commanders ill. 

The accomplishments listed above indicate Pat's 
material contributions to the Institute and to his 
class. There are others of course, abstract ones 
such as his enthusiasm, his conscientioixsness, his 
spirit, and his cheerfulness; all these are contribu- 
tions in that they have served as inspirations to 
those who have known him. 

It is always gratifying to know a man who is 
capable and serious in line of duty, but who is not 
so utterly absorbed in his work that he does not 
take time out to play occasionally. Realizing that 
all work and no play makes Johnny a dull boy, 
Pat was not above joining the crowd at reasonable 
intervals fcr an afternoon at the Embassy Club. 

Looking back upon the successful year "B" 
Company has had under his capable military lead- 
ership, we are not surprised to learn that he enter- 
tains thoughts of entering the Army. We have 
known him as a private, as a corporal, as a ser- 
geant, and as a captain; may we have the pleasure 
of knowing him in the future as a general. 





Arthur Henry Robertson 

7«-0il" -'Robbie" Chase Citv, Virg 

Civil Engineering 
Cavj(ry 



Eladio Rubira 

■R„by" "Lily" Mobile, Alaba 

Civil Engineering 

Field Artillery 



(4, 1). Corporal (3); Sergeant (2); A. S. C. E. (2, 1); 
O. G.'s Association (1). 



Private (4. 3, 2, 1); Gym Team (4 

(3, 2, 1); Cheerleader (3, 2); Bu< 

Head Cheerlead 



3, 



1) 



Swimming Team 
The C^del (2); 



To Chase City gees the honor of having pro- 
duced the most running corporal, sergeant, and 
first class private in barracks, for early in his 
third class year Robbie received the honored nick- 
name of "Jet-Oil," traditionally, if not officially 
awarded by each class to one of its members. 

No dude is Jet-Oil, however, as anyone who has 
ever tangled with him in intramural wrestling 
knows, for the grappling sessions that he and his 
Varsity-wrestler roommate. Horsey Hill, have car- 
ried on have taught him much about the famed 
Japanese art. 

In Civil Engineering Robbie has shown like a 
beacon, and he has acquired the reputation of com- 
pleting a drawing plate, the Nemesis of many an 
engineer, in record time. The extra time thus ac- 
quired, he has spent quite profitably in the vicinity 
of Harrisonburg, the life of which centers around 
Madison College. 

In leaving, we say, "Here's to Robbie and the 
girls he attracts, we hope we'll never lose either." 



A true Alabama gentleman entered the Institute 
in the fall of '35 with little knowledge of the 
type of life he was to live for the next four years. 
But he was quick to catch on to military life, and 
his personality and constantly radiating good hu- 
mor soon made him a fixture in the Corps and with 
his Brother Rats of the class of '39. 

Early in our Rat year we realized that Ruble was 
talented in handling his body with graceful and 
seemingly easy movements. His performance on 
the parallel bar indicated that to us. During his 
third class year he won a position on the swim- 
ming team and for the next three years he almost 
single-handedly gained all the team's points in the 
fancy diving event. He did not stop at bringing 
cheers to himself, but became a cheerleader and 
was elected head cheerleader his last year. 

Ruble is intelligent and could see thrci.'gh the 
problems in Civil with the best of them, but his 
unassuming manner did not lead to stars. We 
know that there are stars for him in Alabama, and 
in life. 



m 



I 



h 



m 



^ 



Edward Harrison Rupiin 

•Ed" Hoj.iiwiii.r.. Vn.<;ii 

Civil E,i>.in™nn« 
I-u-IJ ArnlUry 



Walikr Ai.exanukr Samans 

■•/{„,„■• "SuJ Sam'' I'HII.AMI.I'IDA, i-hU 

Civil [^nKin««rTinf£ 
l-„U ArnlUjy 



rivatc 14, 1); CorpornI (3); Academic Stars 13, 2. 1); Sfi 
(2)i Cadc-t Librarian; A. S. C. E. (2, 1); Barbary Coasc ( 



e (4, 3, 2, I J; Second Oan Show C4. if, ImramuraU (4, 
U; The Cadel Staff (}J; Painlcr'a Union (2, Ij; MinUur 
of Propaganda, Barbary Coast 1 1 ) . 



Intelligent, experienced, and worldly wise, Ed 
Ruffin is anything but ostentatious; in fact, he has 
a reserve and a reticence which he has turned into 
virtues. As a regular Jack-of-all trades he has 
been a boon to the N. Y. A. staff throughout his 
cadetship. 

Though a civil engineer, Ed Is an asset to any 
barracks bull session; his wealth of experiences on 
both land and sea have provided hiir. with stories 
which we have all thrilled to hear. 

With his extreme practicality and his zest for in- 
struments, we were not surprised to find Ed enter- 
ing the Civil Engineering Department when the 
time came for him to make his choice. Here he 
has gained the everlasting admiration of each and 
every one of his instructors and has been the envy 
of many brother engineers. 

Ed probably plans to continue with Civil Engi- 
neering as his life work, but we who have listened 
spellbound to his marvelous tales of the sea shan't 
be surprised if he turns out to be another Hali- 
burton. 



The post-nursery rhyme concerning the finale of 
the "Yankee born, Yankee bred," was never af>- 
plied more fittingly than to "Boot." Witty, pseudo- 
cynical, and with a bent for excitement, he was 
never one to play the role of a shy wallflower. From 
our Rat year onward, he has managed to be the 
lifeblood and moving spirit of any scheme that 
promised diversion. It was through following this 
line of action that he was, significantly, the only 
one caught throwing firecrackers in the super 
shirt-tail parade of our third class year. 

A prominent member of Privates Row since the 
inclusion of his name on V. M. I.'s roster, "Sad 
Sam" has devoted his energies to extra-curricular 
and nonmilitary matters. But it is as a Brother 
Rat that Boot's light shines, for never could one 
find a more worthwhile friend. Friendly yet frank, 
intelligent, honest and dependable are words that 
only partially serve to picture him. The unwilling- 
ness of Brother Rats to part forever at Finals is 
intensified for those who know, and will remember, 
Boot. 





Delbert Kay Santee, Jr. 

"Del" Bethlehem, Pennsy 

Civil Engineering 
Cavalry 

Private (4, 3, 2, 1); Glee Club (4, 3, 2, 1) 



Out of the smoke-laden wilds of Bethlehem, 
Pa., there came one day to V. M. I. the most re- 
bellious of "regulation rebels" ever to grace the 
solemn halls of the Institute. Misunderstood from 
the start, Delbert found himself immediately rele- 
gated to the realm of the "two per cent." Having 
no military aspirations whatever, "Del" worked his 
way up through the ranks to the proud station of 
cadet private, first class, and the honored title of 
"one of the boys." 

At heart a Liberal Artist, "Del" took to the 
C. E. Department, and muttering all the while the 
refrain of "I came, O 'Bootie,' lend thine ear, be- 
cause my father sent me here." 

In this same refrain lies the secret of "Deke's" 
original jaunt to the hills of Rockbridge County, 
yet, despite many vigorous protests to the contrary, 
every September found him once again climbing 
into the "grossest uniform since Jackson." 

And now, "Del," it's over at last. The future? 
And your wild dreams? Oh, they'll come true. 



Oscar Boyd Saunders 



Civil Engineering 

I„famry 

Private (4, 2. 1); Football (4, 3, 2, 1); Basketball (4, 3, 2, 1) 
Baieball (4. 3, 2. 1); Intramurals (4, 3, 2, 1); Corporal (3) 
Monogram Club (3, 2, 1); A. S. C. E. (2, 1); Secret "15.' 

Doc came to us from a prep school where he 
had made a name for himself as an athlete. This 
record he has successfully carried into V. M. I., 
and had it not been for unfortunate injuries we 
know that Doc would be remembered for an even 
liner record than the one he established for him- 
self. 

Doc decided to cast his lot with the Civil boys, 
and although he has not allowed his work to be- 
come a handicap to other activities, he has done 
it well. 

Oscar is one of V. M. I.'s true Casanovas. He 
has left a stream of broken hearts all over the 
state, and what's more, he is still in action. It 
seems as though he might have found his O. A. O. 
at this point, however. 

Whenever there is a bull session raging, it is 
almost a sure bet that Oscar will be part of it and 
that he invariably has something interesting and 
instructive to contribute. 

Doc's sense of humor and his ability to differen- 
tiate important things from nonessentials will cer- 
tainly carry him over many obstacles which he 
may meet. 






m 



\ 



h 



m 



Joseph Lynn Savage 

"/oc" ■■Doc" Fur.iii.nir.Ksnvuc, V.nr.rN.'A 

I.ibnal Arts 

Private (4, 2, I); Corporal (3); Carrie Nation Club (4, 3. 

2, 1); Editorial Staff, The Cidcl (3, 2); O, G.'s Association (I); 

Outrage Editor, Bomb ( I ) ; Episcopal Supprr Club I I I . 

Our first acquaintance with Joe came when we 
heard certain remarks concerning Jet-Oil and 
Fredericksburg addressed to him our Rat year. 
Since that time he has proved himself a true V. 
M. I. cadet along those same lines. In the military 
realm so often associated with shoe polish he be- 
came a corporal, made an excellent record in Mil- 
itary Science, and showed himself to be worthy of 
high trust as a leader and an able second to his 
Brother Rat officers. As a complement to these 
abilities he has proven himself a true man worthy 
of his state and his historic home, Fredericks- 
burg. 

Joe was often supposed to have slept in class, 
but those who sat beside him knew that he was 
really thinking up some of the droll humor for 
which he was noted. He was quiet but devoted 
to his Brother Rats. 

From four years of acquaintanceship with Joe we 
know that he will always strive to make life pleas- 
ant for those around him. He will successfully 
turn his energy to meet any task assigned him, 
and above all he will be — a gentleman. 



Ira Nelson Saxe 

Wii.vr Huu'-F.v. New YoKr 
Electrical EnKine«rinx 
fuel J ArlilUr/ 



i'rlvate (4, 3, 2, I); Football (4): Ka^Wlball (4, J, 2. 1); TtwV- 

(4, 3, 2, 1); /ankce Club (4, 3, 2. I); Monoxram Ciub (2, II: 

A. I. E. E. (2, I). 



Ira Saxe, the strong, silent, tall, athletic Yankee 
blossomed out in a role different from any he had 
played before when he found himself literally be- 
sieged by adoring women during his camp days, but 
he apparently had no difficulty in choosing a par- 
ticular one. Camp also proved to be an exciting 
experience for Ira, although experience is really 
too mild a word, in that it marked the period of 
possession of a car, or perhaps we should say, a 
'29 Ford. 

Most of Ira's attention in barracks has been 
devoted to one of the toughest courses that V. 
M. I. has to offer. Electrical Engineering, and to 
athletics, for Ira has been a three-sport man, foot- 
ball, basketball, and track occupying his time. In 
recognition of his services on the basketball team 
Ira was initiated into the Monogram Club, and 
one of the outstanding moments of the Monogram 
Club Show was Ira's rendition of "In a Chapel in 
the Moonlight." Watch the watts and women, 
Ira, and you can't go wrong. 






^®^^^ '"^l^^k 


3 




^ P^ j 

m 0%.. ,^L 


I 




• 


i ^^ 




John Edgar Seaton 

"Chub" Staunton, Vii 

Cvil Engineering 
FifW ArlilUry 



Gordon Kenneth Slaughter 

••Kt-nny" ''Slug" Norfolk 

Electrical Engineering 
Car^hy 



Private (4, 3, 2, 1); Football (4, 3, 2); Second Class Show (3); 
A. S. C. E. (2, 1); O. G.'s Association (1). 



Private (4, 3, 2, 1); Norfolk Club (3, 2, 1); Second Class Show 

(3, 2); Second Class Finance Committee (2); Glee Club (2, 1); 

Academic Stars (3, 2); Assistant Manager, Varsity Track (2); 

A. I. E. E. (2, 1); O. G.'s Association (1). 



'Tis said of Chub Seaton that when he first 
came to V. M. I. he counted off 2, 3, and 4, and 
that six months later it was only 2 and 3, but re- 
gardless of how much weight he lost, he never 
lost the good nature that proverbially goes with 
those who are built a little more solidly than their 
fellows. 

To the Rat football team and the "F" Company 
line he was a blessing in no disguise, and Civil 
Engineering came to him as easily as a pair of 
queens, for when he first peeped through a transit 
he knew that he had found his chosen field. 

Never to be forgotten was Chub's impersonation 
of the negro mammy in '38's "Ten-Four-and-Sixty- 
four," with his authoritative massaging of the 
alluring Smokey Patton. Likewise, the camp ar- 
tillerymen will never forget his dominating figure 
atop the "Load." With the biggest and best of the 
brothers, '39 parts regretfully, Chub, and wishes 
you all the good luck that your cheerful nature 
and abilities deserve. 



"Nathan, put down a hay!" and almost any 
afternoon you could be sure of finding the lead- 
ing barracks "hay hound" defending his title. No, 
"Kenny" is not a Liberal Artist, but being blessed 
with the ability to work a difficult calculus prob- 
lem, play a vicious game of bridge, and hold a 
heated discussion on the "Art of Leeching," all at 
the same time, he has guided his academic abilities 
into the field of Electrical Engineering. 

Hailing from Norfolk in the fall of '35, "Ken- 
ny" ambled into the Rat line armed with non- 
chalance, his suitcase, and an accordion. Some- 
how or other Slaughter always seemed to be around 
when things began to happen. Although he wore 
a clean sleeve for four years, he was "grafted" 
into a position on the Second Class Finance Com- 
mittee, and the following year he fell heir to a 
place on the Hop Committee. 

Women? They never perturbed him. "Shucks, 
fellas, they're strong for me." And so are your 
Brother Rats, "Kenny." 



] 



m 



1! 



h 



m 



1 



Donald Bill Si.essman 



Private (4, 3, 2, I); Yankee Club 14, 3. 2, 1); Boxins (4, 3); 
Glee Club (3); A. S, C. E. (2. I); O. G.'s Association (I). 

"Donald Duck" can be counted upon to try 
anything once, which is probably the reason why 
he came to V. M. I. in the first place. Since that 
fatal day he has found a secure place in the hearts 
of all the brothers. Somehow the powers that 
be overlooked the "Jeep" when the time came 
around for appointments, and he has remained a 
time-honored and most respected resident of 
Privates Row. However, if you really need a first 
line at parade, just turn the company over to Don 
— the results are phenomenal. By way of recrea- 
tion, Don has been a veritable tower of strength 
for "E" Company, and was one of the mainstays 
of the boxing team before the discontinuance of 
that sport. 

The "Jeep's" unconquerable hobbies seem to be 
guns and women. In regard to the former he is 
almost fanatical. Any Saturday you can find him 
prowling about some pawn shop or walking around 
the stoop literally armed to the teeth, and the 
camouflaged arsenal which he calls his room bris- 
tles with weapons. In between times, he takes oc- 
casion to captivate the gals over HoUins way. 
Good luck. Jeep. 



Wll.f.lAM ROYAI.I. SmITHEY, JU. 

■■/I, If UnivkHift. Vlcf,!;*!* 

Cht-miMry 

I'utJ Arllllrty 



(4 



3. 2, I); BoxinK li); V. A, S. (2. I): Editorijl 
CaJri (2|i Aijijiane Sporu Editor. Tht C^dtl III; 
>rial Staff, lioMB (I): O. Q.\ Attociation (1). 



"Smyth" came from the heart of the University 
of Virginia to matriculate at V. M. I. on that 
memorable day in the fall of '35. While well 
grounded in the ways of "Wahoo" by his keen 
observations as a resident of the university Cir- 
cle, "Smittey" was soon able to distinguish the 
V. M. I. way of accomplishing things from all 
other ways. This, of course, was not made possi- 
ble without numerous visits and conferences with 
the feathered non-coms on the west side of the 
second stoop. 

As a member of the Field Artillery and of "F" 
Company, Smithey was never troubled with any 
military rank as he remained one of the true 
brothers for his entire career as a cadet. 

"Smittey" went in for the chemistry course in 
a big way and soon developed into one of the most 
proficient chemists and hay hounds of the entire 
department. 

His natural ability and seriousness of purpose 
will enable "W. R." to make a successful career 
in chemistry or in anything else he may undertake. 





Thomas Walton Spurgin 

Norfolk, Vn 
Liberal Arts 
Field Arldlery 



Richard Donald Strickler 

Arlingto 
Civil Engineering 
Field ArtilUry 



(4, 3, 2, 1); Fenang (4); Swimmmg (3). 



Private (4); Boxing 14, 3); Track (4, 3, 2, 1); Football (4, 3, 
2, II; Monogram Club (3. 2, 1); All-State Tackle (3, 2): A. S. 
C. E. (2, 1); Southern Conference Shot-put Champion and Record 
Holder; President, Monogram Club (I); President, Athletic Coun- 
cil (1); Captain, Company "F" (I); Captain, Track ID. 



"Nice day, isn't it, Major" — this invariably 
comes from Teena at the beginning of each class 
as the unpredictable colossus tries valiantly for the 
bull session that is never forthcoming. Teena 
throughout his four years here has provided much 
of the life and fun of L. A. 2, and his unending 
experiments, although sometimes unavailing, are 
always indicative of his inherent wit and good na- 
ture. While the S.-Purg didn't go in for militar- 
ism from the proverbial chevron standpoint, if you 
ever want to know anything about tactics, guns or 
K. P.'s just ask Spurgin. 

His love life remains a mystery, and all we 
can get is the whimsical, cryptic, "Certy you think 
so." Teena is a born Liberal Artist and between 
hay periods and swimming practice he somehow 
finds time to do his abhorred German. Two syl- 
lable words may make his eyebrows raise, but 
Teena remains among the best and truest of ar- 
tillerymen. Somehow our class just wouldn't seem 
complete without him. 



One day in the spring of 1939 a report came 
out on the delinquency sheet — "Strickler, R. D. — 
taking unauthorized civilian in barracks." Many 
of us saw this civilian. He was a boy of about 
five years. Big Strick was leading him by the 
hand through the courtyard. This incident shows 
something of the character of a man who has made 
a way for himself in many ways, but who has 
never lost sight of the more insignificant persons 
about him; one who always had another's interest 
in view as well as his own. 

Dick has been a capable captain of "F" Com- 
pany, a consistently fine performer in sixty-minute 
style on the squadron, and a Southern Conference 
champion in the shot-put. He has served on the 
Athletic Council, and was president of the Mon- 
ogram Club in 1938-39. 

Dick expects to continue his military career as 
an officer in the Marine Corps. V. M. I. is for- 
tunate in sending such a representative into the 
service. 



] 



m 



E 



I 



m 



i 



Donald James Stroop 

■■I.ri M.in" ■■D„n'' Gr.FiNllkooK, CONNnCTICUT 

Civil HiiKinwrinK 

CjyMry 

Pi.vate (4, 3, 2, I); Wicstling (4); Intramurals (4, 3. 2, 1); 
Yankee Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Cross-Coumiy (4); Riding Club (3. 
2, 1); Rifle (3, 21; Bu:inc5s Staff, 'I he CJcl (2); A, S. C. 12. 
(2, 1); Hditoiial Siaff, I he Cilel 11); O. G.'s A.«ocialion (1); 
Baptist Club ( 1 ) . 

"I'm a 'damyankee' and mighty proud of it!" 
So the Connecticut Yankee in King Kilbourne's 
court, despite all censure of the brothers from 
Dixie, continues to maintain the complacency 
characteristic of only the "Little Man." 

Donald has had a long and arduous career at 
the Institute. He found it necessary to get a 
year's head start, but in due time he was welcomed 
into his logical place in the ranks of " '39." Not- 
withstanding a permanent membership to the 
"Floating U.," Stroop has struggled not in vain 
beneath the questioning eyes of the "Bootie" and 
the "Buzz. " 

Never, at any time, cherishing any deep-seated 
military aspirations, he has been content to grace 
the ranks of "C" Company's diminutive titans, and 
on the short end, at that. Yet, his size cannot 
belittle his ability, as his friends (and there are 
many) can testify. 

So, here's to you, Don, it is not without just 
cause that we can say, "Good work, Little Man, 
you've had a busy day." 



William Arthur Sutherland, Jr. 

"Hilly" Curroii Focce, VttKiiutA 

OifmUtry 



iivatc 14, 3, 2 
ling (2h Aisi! 



Ij; WrMtling (4. \}; AjAManz MafUger, Sw-ifx 
ant Manager of Bateball 12); V. A, S. (2, IJ 
O. G.'s A&iociation il). 



Efficiency is the keyword for Billy Sutherland's 
character. We have seen this made manifest 
through his duties as assistant manager of swim- 
ming, as assistant manager of baseball, as an N. 
Y. A. worker, and as an Officer of the Guard. 

Socially, he has made his appearance on the 
campus of every girls' school in the vicinity of 
Lexington at least once during his cadetship, 
showing decided favoritism for Hollins his last 
year. 

Academically, he has been a steady student, very 
nearly qualifying for the category titled "brows." 
He is an "object of honest pride" for his instruc- 
tors. 

By way of interests, Billy is a genuine horse 
lover. Much of his spare time is spent in the 
corral or at White's farm on his favorite mount. 

Along with his gratifying efficiency, his academic 
stability, and his sociability, Billy Sutherland has 
exhibited an amazing faculty for taking his hard 
knocks without a complaint — in fact, with a smile. 








Larry Thompson Swann 

Roanoke, VIRGI^ 
Civil Engineering 
Inta„ny 



Private (4, 3, 2, 1); Rifle Team (3); Fencing (3); Vicc-Prcsidei 
Baptist Club (2); A. S. C. E. (2, 1). 



Larry came to us from Roanoke in 1935. He 
was not long in deciding that the infantry was to 
be his unit, and he has been an ardent supporter 
of "B" Company and the pebble pushers during 
his four years as a cadet. 

L. T.'s activities in barracks have been varied. 
He has fired for the Institute on the rifle team 
and has parried and lunged on the fencing team. 

After his second year, Larry decided that C. E. 
was the course for him, and he has been a main- 
stay among Buzz's boys ever since. 

Larry had quite a reputation as a driver when 
he came to V. M. L Last year at camp he veri- 
fied the rumors in a most realistic manner. He 
was always very philosophical about such matters. 

We are not sure what Larry will do when he 
leaves V. M. L, but we are sure that whatever it 
is, he will project his personality into it, and to 
the advantage of all concerned. 



John Mackenzie Tabb 

"AUck" MiDDLEBURG, VIRGINIA 

Civil Engineering 

FiclJ ArldUry 

Private (4, I); Track (4. 3); Basketball (4); Hop Committee (4, 
3, 2, 1); Intramurals (4, 3, 2, I); Corporal (3); Sergeant (2); 
Polo (3, 2, 1); Co-Secretary, Hunt Committee (2); A. S. C. E. 
(2, 1); Master of Hounds, Hunt Club (1); Chairman, Floor Com- 
mittee (I). 

The baying of hounds, the neighing of horses, 
the blaring of horns, and the cries of hunts- 
men, are music to the ears of J. Mackenzie Tabb. 
As Master of Hounds of the Hunt Club and Co- 
Secretary of the Hunt Committee, he is a beau- 
tiful rider and a skillful one too, as his place on 
the polo team truly indicates. 

Mack has been both a corporal and a sergeant, 
but his most responsible position has been on the 
Hop Committee. He has held the chairmanship 
of the Floor Committee, and in that capacity has 
been an important factor in the smooth-running of 
the hops. 

Intramurals have always interested Tabb, and 
he has put out for his company every year in its 
competition against other companies on the hill. 
He has excelled especially in track and basketball. 

Always impeccably turned out, Tabb has the air 
that only grooming and good taste can give. Truly 
he is a worthy representative of a proud F. F. V. 
Here's hoping Mack will always be able to be the 
first to cry "ven halloo!" 



I 



m 



i 



h 



m 



John Edmonds TAi.MAh 



•■Johwy- 



Gvil E-nginci-rinK 
C.,r.,l,y 

Private (4, 2, U; WrcstliiiB (4, 3, 2. I); Baseball (4. 3, 2); 

Corporal (3); Vice-President, A. S, C. E. (2); Vice-President. 

Richmond Club (2); Monogram Club (2, \); Captain, Wrestlins 

(1); President, Richmond Club (Ui Intramural Council (I). 

John Taltnan's forte is wrestling — a sport in 
which he has been proficient for four years. As 
captain of his team, he has led it to repeated vic- 
tories. But Johnny is no mere torso-twister! Dur- 
ing his cadetship, this monogram man has proved 
to his Brother Rats that under his infectious grin, 
there lies a mind that is capable and sober. In 
recognition of this admirable characteristic, he was 
elected to both the presidency of the Richmond 
Club and the vice-presidency of the A. S. C. E. 

Talman was a high ranking corporal, but lost his 
place in the sun in his second class year. As a first 
classman, however, he has shone brightly as the "C" 
Company guidon carrier and as an O. D. whose 
guard tours have been marked by efficiency and 
fairness. 

Johnny is e.xtremely popular with all who know 
him, for they realize full well that his friendship 
is genuine and sincere. Yet, while making friends 
for himself, he has done much for the credit and 
honor of V. M. I. As a result, we all know that 
Johnny has not "lost sight of the forest for the 
trees." 



Elliott Ray Taylor 

'/Ice" "Nnir" hSm,MIO, ViKCIMf* 

Civil EnKineerinK 

Cavahy 



Private (4. 2, I); Football (4, 3. 2, I); Buktfball f4, 3, 2, I); 

Baseball (4, 2, 1); Monogram Oub (3, 2, \); Opuin, RiAa- 

ball (1). 



Presenting the Ace, none other than that bar- 
racks Casanova, that able athlete, that blond 
Adonis, that good-natured martyr to the cause of 
Civil Engineering — the Boot. 

Yessah, Ray thought so much of his studies that 
he often spent the summer in Lexington doing "re- 
search" work. His athletic ability, however, speaks 
for itself. During three years of Monogram 
winning, he has collected numerous honors, includ- 
ing All-State end and captain of the basketball 
team. 

There were two extra-curricular activities dear 
to the Boot's recreation schedule, his hay and 
Sweet Briar, the hay during the week and the 
Patch over the week-end. Women — at least a 
dozen in four years — have tried hard, but he hasn't 
fallen yet. Ace is one of the few who can proudly 
boast "they haven't caught me running the block 
— yet." 

Certainly Ole Man Success will get you Ray, 
and all the brothers are with you right straight 
to the top. 




J 




Heber Lomax Thornton 

"Hcb" "H. L." Fredericksburg, Virginl 

Liberal Arcs 
Field ArlUUry 



Private (4, 3, :. 1); Boxing (4); Northern Virginia Club <4, 3); 
Polo Team (2, 1,1; Riding Club (2, IJ; O. G.'s Association (1). 



When a rather small third classman stepped up 
to a Rat on September morn and asked that new 
cadet's name, from somewhere up in the clouds 
there drifted down the reply, "Thornton, H. L., 
sir." Three years later it was "H. L. Thornton — 
Loans," and first and second classmen streamed to 
111 to consult the jolly old Shylock about a little 
ready cash on next month's pay check. Heber ac- 
commodated them all and earned the reputation of 
being about the nicest capitalist m barracks. 

While Heber's military abilities were never rec- 
ognized by the authoi-ities, he proved them to his 
Brother Rats many times by ably filling in vacant 
lieutenancies. In Liberal Arts Heber discovered 
himself and showed his ability to digest anything 
from Kant to Shakespeare. 

With one of the best-natured and best-liked of 
its Brother Rats '39 parts with regret and wishes 
him all the success to which his abilities and char- 
acter point. 



Edmund Jackson Tice 

"Jack" Roanoke, Virginia 

Civil Engineei-ng 

F,dd Arlillcry 

Private (4); Roanoke Club (4. 3, 2, 1); Corporal (3); Sergeant 

(2); A. S. C. E. (2, 1); Manager, Football (21; Field Artillery 

R. O. T. C, Outstanding Camper (2); Honor Court (1); General 

Committee (II; Lieutenant ( 1) . 

One can't help admiring Jack Tice. About him 
there is the air of authority that is the mark of 
a leader, yet this power is in no way derived from a 
sense of his own mental and moral superiority but 
rather from the opinion, respect, and esteem of his 
fellow cadets. Everyone of his classmates knows 
that behind Jack's friendly smile there lies a sin- 
cerity and genuineness that is beyond duplication. 
His positions on the Honor Court and General 
Committee are true indications of the influence of 
his character. "Zamski," as Tice came to be 
known after a certain disastrous haircut in Wash- 
ington, has been prominent also in the field of 
athletics. He was the stellar player in the inter- 
battalion football games, is on the Athletic Coun- 
cil, and was manager of the football team. At 
Fort Hoyle, Tice and Rubira were the owners of 
that mechanically propelled avalanche, "the Load." 
While there, he was awarded a medal for being 
the "Outstanding Camper at Fort Hoyle." This 
Roanoke boy has been a corporal, a sergeant, and 
a second lieutenant. Jack Tice's record in envia- 
ble! 



m 



i 



h 



m 



William Alblkt Tiijwi:ll, Jk. 



L,->eral A,ts 






/„/j„/,y 






Academic Sia 
Kifle Sharpsho 


(4. 31; 
IS (2, 1 
ter; pLsto 


1-1,11/ 

: Li 

M 



poral (3); biTtca 



Bill arrived at the Institute a corn-fed Indiana 
lad, yet a boy with ideas and a real purpose in 
life. Even at the knee-high-to-a-beer-bottle stage 
he was already conducting the troop movement of 
his toy soldiers, and thus with the repetition of 
history and due passage of time (to say nothing of 
a lot of conscientious effort and a fine exhibition 
of talent and efficiency) the Tid sports an adju- 
tant's chevrons, loudly oversees guard mounts, and 
looks out for the fortunes of the first battalion in 
general — all this in addition to a turn at fencing 
and the rifle team, and periodic visitations to the 
"Briar Patch." 

Academically, "Shakespeare 11" didn't really 
find himself until his second class year, but since 
that time he has been one of L. A.'s ace perform- 
ers. Ask him anything from Hamlet to the Son- 
nets. He not only thinks, he knows, and will 
probably quote you a few lines for good measure. 
For recreation he frequently "wows" the faculty 
with his poetry. Yet far from being a drudge he 
has written many a chapter in that tour-riddled 
volume, "Privates' Lives." 'Member those columns. 
Bill? 



PhF.STON pLETf.HKR 1 INSI.LY, Jc. 
'■/'/<•." CirilMO-.f,, Vll 

Oiemitlfy 



Private 14. 3. 2. 1); Boning (4); Kichmond Cub (4. ), I, I): 

O. C,.\ Al,^oclaclun 11;; Adininiilraiot of WopaK^mlj. Baibary 

Coail (I ). 



"Pres" came to V. M. I. from Richmond four 
years ago with the intention of making a name for 
himself. He has succeeded admirably in spite of 
several rather severe setbacks, and has overcome all 
of them with a spirit which is characteristic of him. 

While not a brilliant student, "Doc" has always 
managed to make both academic ends meet with- 
out making himself a drudge. The corps lost a 
military genius when "Mac" decided, at the end 
of his Rat year to cast his lot along with the gross- 
est of the gross. He has remained a private for 
four years, being always "one of the boys." In 
any barracks bull session, "Mac's" adventures with 
Willie's nags will always prove very entertaining. 

All good things must come to an end, Preston, 
and so it is with our brief acquaintance. Here's 
hoping that you'll find the right "berg" some day, 
and until you do, stay in there fighting. 





Nelson Whitney Tobey 



Chemistry 
Field Arnllery 



Yankee Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Pri 
A. S. (2, 1); Edit 



:e (4, 2, 1); Corporal (3); 
al Staff, Bomb (1). 



Quiet, reserved, and keen witted is Nel. Seek- 
ing military training along with academic work, he 
left the seashore of New Hampshire to study 
chemistry at V. M. I. Having attained the rank 
of corporal his third class year, he centered his in- 
terests around academic work the remainder of his 
cadetship. Though unadorned by stars his repu- 
tation was established early, for frequently was the 
query, "Say, 'Starch,' will you help me with this 
problem?" And "Starch" was always willing to 
put down what he was doing and lend a helping 
hand. 

To hear him talk, one is soon convinced that 
New Hampshire is God's country. And to keep 
him posted on the home town there was always 
that letter a day from "her." 

As a research chemist, Nel intends to work for 
his father in the dyestuffs industry. With this in 
mind, all of his academic efforts have been concen- 
trated toward this end. Knowing Nel's aptitude 
as we do, there is no question in our minds as to 
his success in the future. 



Andrew Joseph Trzeciak 

"Andy'' "Speed" New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

Civil Engineering 

Field Artillery 

Football (4, 3, 2, 1); Basketball (4, 3, 2, 1); Baseball (4, 3, 2, 
1); All-State Football Team (4. 3, 2, 1); Private (4, 1); Cor- 
poral (3); Southern Conference, Third Team (3, 2, 1); Captain, 
State Team (4, 3); Treasurer, Yankee Club (3, 2); Monogram 
Club (3, 2, 1); Sergeant (2); Captain, Football (1); Southern 
Conference Blocking Trophy (1); O. G.'s Association (1). 

The space allotted is much too small to do any 
kind of justice to Andy Trzeciak. The sports 
pages for the past few years have not been able to 
do it, so it seems too great a task to be accom- 
plished here. 

We all know of Andy's athletic achievements, 
but there is one notable thing about him both in 
sports and in all phases of life, and that is that 
he comes through when it is most important to 
come through. In other words, Andy is depend- 
able. For four years he has been the field general 
of the "Fighting Squadron," and he was elected by 
his teammates to captain the 1938 team. This he 
did exceedingly well, as evidenced by the record 
which the team has made. 

Andy is a team man on the field, in barracks, 
and in all phases of his life, never seeking the 
honors for himself but always helping others to 
achieve them. In this respect we might well use 
Andy as an example of how to live with our fellow 
men. 

We do not know exactly what Andy's plans for 
the future are, but we know that wherever we 
find him we will find also the real "spirit of V. 
M. I." 






m 



i 



I 



m 



\ 



RorsERT James Tucker, Jr. 

■■I,„„„y- Fr<ANKl./N, VriKHNfA 

i:i.ccncal Enticni-tTing 
I'iclJ Arnllcy 

H.ivate (4, 1). Uifle Team (4); Cross-Country (4); Track (4); 
Intramurals (4, 3, 2, 1); Corporal (3); Sernfani (2Ji Dutineu 
Staff, ■//,(■ C^</« (2); Assistant Manager, Baseball (2); A. I. E. E. 
(2, I); Academic Stars (2, 1); Manager, Rat Baseball (1); Aijver- 
tlsing Manager, Jl-e Cijcl (I); O. D.'s Association 111. 

Franklin has given V. M. I. many outstanding 
men, in the past and the present, and Jimmy be- 
longs with the best that we have seen. "Cheerful" 
epitomizes Jimmy's outlook on life, both barracks 
and social, for, though a star man, he has never 
let his work interfere with hops, trips to Macon, 
and all the other activities that go to make a 
cadet's life worth living. 

Qualities of leadership were never lacking in 
Jimmy's make-up, as his list of achievements at- 
test. For "D" Company he participated in prac- 
tically every form of intramurals, excelling partic- 
ularly in handball and baseball. Rating high aca- 
demically during his first two years, he easily 
earned stars during his last two in one of V. M. 
I.'s toughest courses, Electrical Engineering. 

For three years Jimmy eschewed all vices, but in 
his first class year he went wild, once being seen 
staggering to his room after spending the earlier 
part of the night drinking milkshakes in the PE, 
vociferously condemning his weakness of character. 
It is rumored that once someone saw Roger Beale 
and Jimmy playing Black Jack for matches at 
11:30 at night. Good luck, Jimmy, curb those 
passions! 



Andrew Morris Turner 

Civil Enf{int*rring 
FlelJ ArlilUry 



Private (4, I); Academic Stan (3, 2, l); Roinoke Qub (4, 3, 
2, 1); Corporal (i); SerKeanc (2); A. S. C. E. (2, 1); Secretary, 
A. S. C. E. (2); President, A. S. C. E. (U; O. G.'. AMtocu- 



From the serene city of Roanoke there came 
on the ninth of September in thirty-five one new 
cadet by name A. M. Turner. "Am" soon be- 
came acclimated to life at V. M. I., and pro- 
ceeded on his jaunt through the labyrinth of aca- 
demic and military duties. In addition to the 
prescribed duties of the Institute, "Am" has found 
time to participate in the various activities out- 
side the ordinary requirements. 

The military life of the "Am-Cat" was not neg- 
lected, as he was both a corporal and a sergeant, 
and during his first class year an O. G. In addi- 
tion, he enjoyed the privileges of a private at sev- 
eral times during his cadetship. 

"Am" selected Civil Engineering for his career, 
and became the mainstay of the entire Civil De- 
partment, especially his own "C-4" section. 

His outstanding intellectual abilit)- and fineness 
of character will unquestionably create for "Am" a 
position of honor and respect in all of his future 
enterprises. 





Gordon White Van Hoose, Jr. 

"Hoose" Shreveport, Louisian 

Civil Engineering 

Field Arlillcy 



(4, 3, 1, 1); Wrestling (4, 3, 1); Secret Eight (3, 

nt, Louisiana Club (2); A. S. C. E. (2, 1); O. G.' 

ciation (1); Monogram Club (1). 



2, 1); 



A casual glance at a list of Gordon's accomplish- 
ments at V. M. I. might not be impressive, but 
that doesn't tell the real story. In the final anal- 
ysis it isn't what one has done, but the way in 
which he has done it that counts. By this stand- 
ard, Hoose has more than succeeded in his life at 
the Institute. 

As a Civil Engineer, Gordon has stood near the 
top of his class, showing a real interest in his 
course. As a soldier he has been the dream of 
every first sergeant, a really running first class 
private. 

A member of the wrestling squad for four years, 
Gordon has demonstrated both courage and abil- 
ity, and during his first class year he has been one 
of the mainstays of the team. 

Hoose is a loyal son of the state of the Mardi 
Gras and takes a great pride in it. We know that 
Hoose has given something to '39, to himself, and 
to the true South. 

It is not for tangible qualities that we shall re- 
member Hoose; rather, we shall think of him as a 
sincere friend and a true Brother Rat. 



William Benjamin Verell 

iily" "Beep" Newport Ne» 

Civil Engineering 



Private (4 3, 1); Tennis (3. 2, 1); Sergeant (2); Commandant's 
Clerk (1); Monogram Club (1); Captain, Tennis (1). 



In William Benjamin Verell we have a man who 
made a distinguished place for himself in V. M. I. 
life without championing his own ability. Billy is 
captain of the tennis team. He received his mon- 
ogram at the end of his first year of varsity com- 
petition. For three years he has played a corking 
good game. Without doubt, he is one of the best 
tennis players barracks has ever produced. 

"Beep" took over the job of Commandant's 
Clerk his first class year, realizing the ex- 
acting work it would call for, and he has indeed 
performed his duty both competently and skill- 
fully. 

In the past, men taking this job have often lost 
the intimate contact with their company and class 
that is so necessary for the growth of Brother Rat 
and V. M. I. spirit. Billy, however, has remained 
"one of the boys," and, as a result, he has a host 
of friends. 

This man has got what it takes to be successful 
in life — a quiet, unassuming manner under which 
there lies a dominant and forceful personality. 
Billy Verell holds all the high cards! 



m 



I 



I 



m 



i 



George Brent Vivian 

••Joe" "Kir" NiTHo, West Vii 

ChcmiMry 
C.i>d/» 



Norman Ci.ark Wait 

"Nurih" Sruccis. MiaiiOAK 

Civil Enijinttrinji 



(4. 3, 2); V. A. S. (2. 1); Second Class Show (2); I'f 
bytcruii Club (I); Lifutcnant (I). 



Private (4. 2, I); Corporal (3); A, S. C. E. (2. I); O, G.'j 
Auociation ( 1) . 



One day a Rat was asked, "Mr., where is that 
man from?" "West Virginia, sir!" was the reply. 
The Rat was right. Brent came over the hills from 
West Virginia following in the footsteps of his 
brother, to see for himself what V. M. I. had to 
offer. Friendly and affable, he soon won a place 
in the regard of his Brother Rats and no real bar- 
racks bull session was complete 'til Brent had put 
in his appearance. The stories and lore of his 
native state were inexhaustible, although sometimes 
strongly suggestive of a fertile imagination. 

During his first three years everything seemed 
to indicate that Brent would end his military ca- 
reer without having chevrons sewn on his sleeves; 
however, when make-overs rolled around in '39, he 
was made a lieutenant in "A" Company. 

Vivian joined the ranks of the chemists and took 
a high stand in this course. Experiments per- 
formed in an attempted production of rayon 
should forever be listed among the classics of term 
problems for few indeed embrace such originality. 



Shades of Antisthenes! Meet the Barracks 
Cynic! The first we heard of the diminutive in- 
fantryman our Rat year was when the word came 
around: "It must be good — even Wait likes iti" 
And for four years, "North's" recommendation of 
anything made it ipso facto proficient. One of 
"Ma's" boys, and a frequenter of Mr. Goodbar's 
emporium, "North" seldom could be found around 
barracks on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons. 
Yet he seemed to find time for his C. E., for sev- 
eral times he was perilously close to academic dis- 
tinction ("Certy I'd have made the Honor Roll if 
it wasn't for drawing.") By virtue of rooming with 
the Emir, he was appointed executive officer of 
the Barbary Coast, his qualifications for the job 
being marred only by corporal's chevrons that dec- 
orated his sleeves our third class year. Being a 
lover of good music, a good bridge fourth, with the 
ability to suppress a shudder when confronted by a 
"family size" made his company desirable by any 
and all, and his acquaintance is one of the many 
connection we sorrow to break at finals. 





NoRVELL McVeigh Walker 



Civil Engineering 



Henry Louis Wehrle, Jr. 

Charleston, West Vii 
Liberal Arts 
Inl^mry 



Private (4, 1); Lynchburg Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Track (4, 3); Cor 

poral (3); Sergeant (2); Assistant Manager, Track (2); A. S 

C. a. (2, 1); Assistant Manager Football (2); Manage: ~ 

Track { 1) ; Manager, Rat Cross-Countty ( 1) . 



Rat 



(4, 3, 2, 1); I. A. L. A. (2, 1); Company Clerk (1). 






Following in the footsteps of a brother who grad- 
uated in the class of '28, Norvell came to V. M. I. 
prepared to emulate him, and he has participated 
in as many activities as he has had time for in a 
brief four years. Studies, extra-curricular activi- 
ties, athletics, military positions, and just plain 
fun have occupied his waking hours, and the rest 
he has managed to devote very thoroughly to sleep. 

After running on the track team for his first 
two years he took over managerial duties, rising 
from assistant manager of track his second class 
year, he managed both the Rat track and Rat cross- 
country teams in his last year. 

Camp proved to be one of the outstanding expe- 
riences in Norvell's life, and here he acquired the 
name Morbloom, which was the appellation of a 
horse to which Norvell occupied the paradoxical 
position of being figuratively attached but literally 
unattached. Hold tight, Morbloom. 



m 



E 



A true Liberal Artist if there ever was one, gen- 
uinely fond of good books, good music, and the 
aesthetic things of the world, Louie has given much 
to V. M. L, has enjoyed it, and has got his share 
out of it. He is a faithful movie goer, and is a 
real critic of the screen. If I have created the 
impression that Louie lacks energy, that is false. 
On the contrary, he reads avidly, writes prodig- 
ously, and converses vociferously. He is a natural 
wit and uses it extensively. In short, he is a S. I. 
of the first order. 

During our first class year when the Lectern was 
formed, we needed a constitution. Wehrle was 
the man who so capably wrote it. Immediately 
after that he was elected vice-president of the club 
in which he has served efficiently and charmingly. 

Louie has a host of friends who hope to see him 
some day as a noted lawyer and who wish him 
always the appreciative audience that his ability 
as a formal and informal speaker deserves. 



h 



m 



Oscar Henry West, Jr. 

■Wesly" Kk.iimc.nj.. Vii.(WNr, 

Liberal Arts 



Gl-.ORM-. GkATTAN WeSTON 

•■0. C." Stauhtok, V(»i;ihi, 

Chmittry 



Pistol Team (4, 3, 2, 1); Private 
(2); Wrestling Team (2, 1); Busine 
sistant Manager, Football (2); Kichi 
Pistol Team ( 1) ; Horse Show Team III; 
Business Staff. Bomb III; Lieutenant II); Ini 



; Corporal (3); Sergeant 
staff, The CuJel 12); As- 
id Club (2, 1); Captain, 



I. A. L. A. (2, I); 



Private f4, 3, 2, I); Incramurali (4, 3. 2, 1); Gle. Qub (2): 

Episcopal Club (2): Hunt Club (2. t ) ; V. A. S. (2, I); Epiux>(>al 

Choir II); Keeper of Royal Goat, Barbary Colli (1), 



The psychologists tell us that the most desirable 
personality is one which hits the happy medium 
between introversion and extroversion. Such per- 
sonalities are indeed rare, but from our midst we 
have an impressive example in Oscar West. His 
concern for his own welfare is sufficient to drive 
him to the realization of every notion which he 
decides will be to his advantage; his intense interest 
in many extra-curricular activities remains as proof 
of the other, the extroverted, side of his person- 
ality. Note his fine horsemanship, look at his 
record on the pistol team, watch him command his 
platoon at drill, and you have tangible evidence of 
his prowess. 

And when speaking of Oscar, one cannot fail 
to comment upon the spell which he inevitably 
casts over those girls who have had the pleasure of 
receiving his attentions. 

It is difficult to realize that an intimacy of four 
years' standing has come to a close. 



"Weston, G. G., sir, Staunton, Va., sir." Our 
Rat year George proved his sterling friendship on 
more than one occasion, and he was often heard to 
say, "Come on home with me Sunday — -I'll get you 
a date with the prettiest girl you ever saw." George 
will always be remembered for his sympathetic 
understanding and his willingness to share the 
other fellow's headaches and heartaches. He was 
one person who really seemed to understand the 
true Brother Rat spirit. 

We always noticed that when a tough break 
came his way he accepted it with little or no com- 
plaint. When stormy conflicts arose in barracks, 
duly constituted authorities versus the hell-raising 
cadet spirit, George was always found staunchly 
upholding the cadet traditions. Well, G. G., we 
can only say, that with that mixture of will to 
work, tempered with the ability to play which is 
your philosophy now, you can't lo;e. 





George Major White 

Edenton, No 
Civil Engineering 



William Edmund Wilkins, II 

iitly" Cape Charles, 

Chemi£,try 

Field At,, liny 



Private (4. 1); Fencing 14. 3, :); Intramurals (4. 3, 2, 1); No 
Carolina Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Corporal (31; Sergeant (2); Editoi 
Staff, Jhe C^Jt, (2 ; Second Class Show (21; A. S. C. E. (2, 1 
Horse Show Team (1); Hunt Club (1); O. G.'s Association (i 



Private (4, 2, 1); Corporal (3); Assistant Manager, Swimming 
(2); Assistant Manager. Baseball (2); V. A. S. (2, 1); O. G.'s 



"It's a Yankee lie, suh, the South won!" And 
the tactical genius of Company "C" will be off 
again on Bull Run, Chancellorsviile, and the Val- 
ley Campaign. A son of the Old South, and 
"hailing" from "No'th C'lina," George came to 
V. M. I. with the class of '38, but for "acamedic 
reasons" was taken into the fold of '3?. 

A gentleman of the old school, and possessed of 
a personality and amiability rare in this modern 
age, George lives by a code of ethics maintained 
against any and all. Because of this, George is 
best understood by his friends, of which there are 
many. 

Though not academically inclined, George has 
fought his way gamely through math, materials, 
and the C. E. Department in general. Military 
to the "nth degree," George has worn his share of 
chevrons, and received his quota of "recs." Yes, 
the military is George's inclination. A horseman, 
he was born for the cavalry, and is headed for the 
Army and horses . . . where a gentleman belongs. 



Up from Cape Charles came Powerhouse Billy 
Wilkins to show the brothers of '39 something 
about handling women. According to Billy the 
first rule to be observed is that of punctuality, 
whether she is ready or not, and for four years 
he has been noted for being ready on the dot, if 
not a little while before. Nothing we could do 
ever seemed to help us, but apparently Billy's sys- 
tem works for him, for the good-looking blondes 
and brunettes which have appeared on his arm 
at every set of hops attest to his success. As a 
matter of fact, during his first class year he was 
even known to beat a Mink's time, for which he 
received the congratulations of the entire corps. 

Between his social activities Billy has sandwiched 
some very active academic and extra-curricular 
work, attaining the position of assistant manager in 
both swimming and baseball. Despite these other 
activities he has managed to keep his end up in one 
of V. M. I.'s toughest courses, chemistry. If you 
can manage the women, Billy, ycu can do anything. 



m 



I 



I 



m 



\ 



James McLestku Witt 

■■AUb<wu /immy" li.RMlNraiAM. Al. 

Chemistry 



Private (4, 3, 2, 1); Wrestling (4, 3, 2, 1); Football (4, 3. 2); 
Monogram Club (3. 2, 1). 



Jimmy, "I'm from Birmingham," did not join 
our class until our last year, but it took less than 
a week for him to be known by all and considered 
a true Brother Rat. 

Shortly after he entered V. M. I., it was the 
general opinion that this Alabama boy would never 
finish — he was of the same opinion. There was 
seldom a G. C. meeting, penalty tour, or extra drill 
to which Jimmy did not go, in fact he was often 
captain of the extra drill detail. 

Jimmy's misbehaviors occurred during his first 
three years here, but this year he has been an 
entirely different person. He studied hard and 
consistently, and although he didn't make the best 
grades in the class he compensated for it by having 
that extra bit of common sense. Jimmy is one of 
the best wrestlers the Institute has ever had, and 
should be commended for his victories on the mat. 
His second class year he tied for the Southern Con- 
ference championship; this year he was a Southern 
Conference champion. So long, Jimmy, and Lebe 
Wohl! 



William Francis Wolcott, Jb. 

"lilHy" Astttiyit,LE, NofrTII Ca*OI.I 

Civil Enfcineerinj( 
l-lthl ArnlUry 



Private (4. 3, 2, 1); Swimming (3); A«i-.tan[ Mimgft, Swimming 
(2); Business Staff, 7/). CjJrl (2); A. S.- C. E. (2, l): O. G.'t 
Association ( 1 ) ; Staff Secretary, I he Cudel ( I ) ; Manatin. Swim- 
ming (1); President, North Carolina Club (I), 



When Willie Wolcott stepped into V. M. I. he 
was already well versed in the ways of the world 
and its complications, and before he stepped out 
with his diploma he met a few others, for V. M. I. 
gave him as many tough breaks as possible. But 
they couldn't down his irrepressible good spirits or 
his conviction that he could take all and more than 
V. M. I. had to offer. 

With his Dip Billy takes the memory of Bro- 
ther Rats who found him one of the best. An 
authority on women and OCMNI's, he rarely 
found himself unable to coordinate them. To the 
swimming team he donated his aquatic abilities and 
finally served in the capacity of manager in his first 
class year. A Civil Engineer from the start, Billy 
found himself when he finally entered that course, 
and he came through with the highest kind of fly- 
ing colors. 

We have enjoyed our close friendship with 
Billy these past four years, and we hope that for 
many of us it will not end with graduation. 





John Clifford Wood, Jr. 



\\'£ST Hartf 
Liberal Arts 
Field Arlillery 



James Marvin Woolf 

Wash II 
Civil Engineering 
Cavalry 



(4, 3, 2, 1); Yankee Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Intramurals (4, 3, 
2, 1); Basketball (4); Fencing (3); Riding Club (1). 



Private (4. 3. 2, 1); Ambassador Club (4, 3, 2, 1); Inrramur, 
(4, 3, 2, 1); A. S. C. E. (2, 1); O. G.'s Association (1). 



Jack Wood came a long distance to be a Key- 
det. We believe that he does not regret it, cer- 
tainly we do not. Jack has gotten much from 
V. M. I., but he has also found an O. A. O. out- 
side the Limits Gates. His faithfulness in this 
affair is nothing short of astounding, and we wish 
to congratulate him. 

At the end of his third class year Jack decided 
that his was to be the life of a Liberal Artist. 
Here he has taken things in his stride and at the 
same time made a place for himself. He has been 
an "F" Company artilleryman, and has added ma- 
terially to that company's high position in the 
corps, particularly by his continuous participation 
in intramurals. 

Jack gets a real kick out of riding, and much 
of his time is spent in this pursuit, usually not 
alone. 

Don't take the leap too soon. Jack, it's dan- 
gerous. But if you do, the brothers of '39 will 
be looking out for you. 



On that day in September, 1935, when fate 
drew us of the class of 1939 together as Brother 
Rats, there came from Washington, D. C, our 
classmate Marvin. 

From that time on Marvin entered into the 
spirit of things, and has continued in that same 
way through these four years. While neither a 
Napoleon nor a Stonewall Jackson, he has taken 
his place in the other activities of V. M. L When- 
ever one wants to know anything about orchestras, 
music, or bridge, Marvin knows the answer. 
Women also fall before his charm, and he is well 
known at many of the neighboring girls' schools. 

Having cast his talents with the Civil boys, he 
is destined to go far in this work. While in- 
tensely interested in Civil Engineering, he is also 
extremely fond of banking, and none of us would 
be surprised to see either a banker or an engineer 
emerge in the next few years. Good luck. Brother 
Rat, and may the rest of your life be as pleasant 
as ours has been with you these past few years. 



m 



I 



5 m i 



Tyree Lawson Wright 

"Egg" Suvut RosroN. Vikcinia 

Chemistry 
r,cUI Aflillcy 

Private (•». 3. 2, I); V. A S. (2, III O. G.'s Association (l|. 



From the famous tobacco country of South Bos- 
ton came Tyree Lawson Wright. The assembled 
brothers of '39 took one look at this last product 
of famous V. M. I. country and decided unani- 
mously that the only right and fitting appellation 
for a human of Tyree's conformation was Egghead, 
and Egghead it has been since that time. After 
recognizing the true comradely spirit in the small 
artilleryman they decided he needed a nickname 
and he received the dubious honor of having his 
name shortened to Egg. 

Egg was never one to be backward, and he soon 
showed his prowess at various forms of intramu- 
rals, excelling particularly in basketball, for his 
form while sinking one from the middle of the 
floor was something to be envied. 

The octopussian Chemistry Department 
stretched its tenacles toward Tyree at the end of 
his third class year and he succumbed, but turned 
the tables by coming through with flying colors. If 
you go back to God's country, Egg, tell them they 
sent another swell boy and Brother Rat to V. M. I. 



Gawk Yee 

Civil Eni4ine«inK 
fulj ArnlUry 



14, 3, 2, I); Academic Sun (}); 1 
l>): A. S. C. E. (2, 1) 



, A. S. C. E. 



When Gawk arrived at V. M. I. on that mem- 
orable morning of September 9, 1935, he had a 
purpose in view. This purpose has never wavered 
in the four years that have elapsed since that Sep- 
tember morning. Gawk's record has resulted from 
that resoluteness of character; he has consistently 
been one of the leading students in the class of 
1939. But his activities were not limited to his 
studies alone, and he soon found himself the 
elected secretary of the cadet chapter of the A. S. 
C. E. 

Through his never-failing friendliness, his ever- 
prevailing good humor, and his continued hard 
work through these four years, Gawk has gained 
the admiration and friendship not only of his class- 
mates but of the whole corps. 

Yee has taken to the athletes for roommates, 
and we understand that he has loaned a helping 
hand to those Brother Rats whose task is made 
harder by the extra duty which a career on the 
gridiron calls for. 

Good luck. Gawk! We know you'll make the 
grade in anything you do and in grand style. 




EX - CLASSMATES 

I 11 

SCHOOL 





i 



] 



m 



K 



HARKRADER 



I 



m 





EDWARD HENRY CHAMBERLIN, 



WILLIAM JUDSON EASTHAM 



GEORGE HERBERT MARTIN 






NISTODY Of 
(LASS Of 




F U 1^ T H 



(LASS 




y E A 1^ 




1. Rest period. ... 2. 'NX'ho's 
visiting in here? ... 3. Light- 
ning" poses. ... 4. He hasn t 
changed much. ... 5. Back to 
nature. ... 6. Monday morning, 
... 7. Three of a kind. . . 
Misto Hastings. ... 9. Joe Ross 
himself — remember? ... 10 
Tickled pink. ... 11. Pre 
chevron davs. ... 12. 'Ghost 
on the mountain. ... 13. Room^ 
mates. ... 14. Lazv weather. . . 
15. Guess who. ... 16. Don"c 
fall off, \'awter. ... 1". Fin out 
for the cameraman. Bill. . . . 18. 
Simple furnishings. ... 19. Ugh! 
. . . 20. Prett\- running, wasn't 
he? ... 21. Not sick are vou 
Ace? . . . 22. Preparing for the 
hav. 



T H I 1^ D 



(LASS 




y E A 1^ 




12 r 







1. Gay enough before the battle. 
... 2. A tribute to the war dead. 
... 3. Pals. ... 4. Why the 
reverence, Chiles? ... 5. Sil- 
houette. ... 6. What's so hilari- 
ous, Frank? ... 7. N'icton,^ — one 
casualt)-. ... 8. He plans to be 
a Liberal Artist. ... 9. Proud of 
'em, aren't you Aisley? . . . 10. 
A melluva hess, but it was worth 
it. ... 11. Think you can stand 
the work, fellas? ... 12. Con- 
struction. ... 13. Good job, two 
per centers. ... 14. A rare treat. 
... 15. Wait a minute, vou guvs 
belong on page 126. ... 16. 
Tony's swingsters. . . . IT. 
Pinkv's health center. ... 18. 
Nocturnal scene. ... 19. Quoth 
the crow, "No, thanks.'' . . . 20. 
After-church gathering. 



SECOND 



(LASS 




y E A 1^ 



• • • 



• • 








ir 
ir 



1. Soldiers, leaders, gentlemen, 
triends. ... 2. Swing it, Jimmyl 
... 3. Christmas decorations. . . . 

4. Old cadets now, butt — .' . . . 

5. Anna Valeska, Horace Pen- 
gard, and the Pirate Crew. . . . 

6. L. to R.: Brand, Mathews, 
Johnson, Irving. ... 7. Jackson 
watches the cameras roil. ... 8. 
It won't be long now. ... 9. 
We're big shots now. ... 10. 
Jimmy Bailey as Captain Apple- 
jack. ... 11. Bishop's batter^'. 
... 12. \ ou haven't forgotten 
Minnie, have you? ... 13. You 
guess. ... 14. Double quartette. 
. . . 15. Come on, nag, move 
over. ... 16. A unique strip 
tease. ... 1^. Mounted pistol at 
Belvoir. ... 18. Mar\-in takes 
aim. ... 19. Engine trouble? . . 

20. The Inirantrv campers. . . 

21. Hev. go "wav and let m: 
sleep, willval ... 22. Not look 
ing their best. . . . 23. Gosh 
we're photogenici ... 24. Back 
from the rifle range. ... 25 
Screwballs. . . . 26. Tank inspec- 
tion. . . . 2~. Finals guard. . . 

28. Hev. what's coming oit? . . 

29. Finishing touches. ... 30, 

the Load loaded. 



S T 



(LASS 




Y E A ^ 




1. Who done it? (See 6 below 
for answer.) ... 2. Just a 
friendly exchange. ... 3. Jack 
Love and his charges. ... 4. Go- 
ing upl . . . 5. \'. M. I. menag- 
erie. ... 6. The guilt}' ones — 
our own Painters Association. . . . 
7. Mish practices for a speech — 
with gestures. ... 8. A faithful 
friend. ... 9. Pre-Taps trifling. 
... 10. Annual O. G. banquet. 
... 11. Answer to vour names. 
... 12. Slaughter sleeps. ... 13. 
Under Brand's able tutelage. . . . 
14. Hamnose. ... 15. The first 
Rat sentinel. ... 16. The book 
looks good a.nv\va.v. Heber. . . . 
17. "And now we're drinking 
rain." ... 18. All our dogs are 
lazy. ... 19. Mrs. Morris and 
\X'a\-ne pay us a \-isit. . . . 20. 
It s not so funnv. is it. Frenchy? 
... 21. The advantage of being 
a Liberal Artist. ... 22. He 
wakes us up. he puts us to bed. 
... 23. Hastings shows "em how. 
. . . 24. T\\'irling a mean lar- 
iat. . . . 15. "God bless our team 
and \'. M. L" 




SECOND (LASS 




THE BOMB Of NINETEEN T H I D T Y - N I N E 

^■IHpi^^P CLASS OF 1940 

1 ai _i> ^ -Tfflt.. ■ '^ ""llu-^ ',' "^ ■*;»■ Reid Stanley Aaron Martinsville, Va. 

^^^ •^^ fllH ' II Civil Engineering 

iP*^ "vS^'^^^^^^B William Kent Arams Danville, \'a. 

'_-N___~^^^|^^^B Clicmislry 

. ^'1 j^ (^IHI 

___ ^^^^^^B^^^^^HEl.' ' S^ George Vinson Atkison .... Charlotte, N. C. 

J9^ f^ T - »2> ^^"^fi^^l ^ :a«t idrrwil I • John Anthony Augustine, III. . Richmond, Va. 

n^^H 9|Ki Cfvil Engineering 

>^|^^^- ife.,AA!l^^^Hiil^^^^Hl^ 'li^N^^^^^^I Donald Mitchell Barglev . . . Chatham, N. J. 

'^^ - ~" Robert Gordon Bailey .... Lvnchburg, Va. 

\ .- ^m \ John Hopkins Baker Richmond, Va. 

^ ttS^h .* #K W) •- -* rj^m Chemistry 

^S If A ^^ 

^^^d^ « ' '^^^Bg^l^^^H William Frazier Baldwin, Jr. . Alexandria, Va. 

,-n^^ft^.^S V^Oii^^^^^H Chemistry 

S- Flournoy Haymes Barksdale . . . Roanoke, Va. 

Liberal Arts 

Robert Hardy Barnes Richmond, Va. 

.^mw: . ^^--« -— „^^^^^ Prc-Medieal 

. __^ .^^^I^^^Kv —^S^^^^l Charles Beach, Jr Beattyville, Ky. 

Norman Cooper Bearden . . Port Gibson, Miss. 
^^^ Chemistry 

M I ^^M ..j jj.|i| i ■ "^ Henry Bernstein Kingston, N. Y. 

B -I '*~ ^^*^H^Bi 1 miiiii Liberal Arts 

y „.. 

Douglas Dillard Bicbie .... Lynchburg, Va. 
Electrical Engineering 

Yandell Bo.atner, Jr Shreveport, La. 

Liberal Arts 

Bruce S. Branson, Jr. . . . Chevy Chase, Md. 
Liberal Arts 

.^^ jjt" :,,.d^ '''^. ^I^^H Scott Hudson Braznell, Jr. . Miami Beach, Fla. 

"^^-A ^^^H^'* *■ " -^^^^^ Liberal Arts 

ii^„ I. . .^ 

}Sr^ .!^H Earl Ivan Brown Lexington, Va. 

Cii'il Engineering 

[ 130) 




CLASS OF 1940 

|AMi:s Wir.sON Hi noii ii:i.n . . . Stciilicnvillc, CJ. 
Elrclrual luif/iiinrini/ 

Jdiis M.\nisi)\ Camp, Jr Franklin, Va. 

C/irmisliy 

Ai.DKPiT \'an Df;vanti;r Carr . Watcrford, Va. 
Lihnul Iris 

Jamks Ro^' Carter, Jr Rnannke, Va. 

Libi-riil .Iris 

Pmi.ip CioDi-REV Chapman' .... l^alla^, Tex. 
Civil Enyinrrrinij 

James Howe Cheek, Jr. . . . Charlottesville, Va. 
Electrical Entiinnrini/ 

Paul Ei.lis Ci.ine Urbanna, Va. 

Clwmislry 

Paul Brown Coloiron Norton, Va. 

Cii'il Enfiiiuerin/j 

JOH.N Douct.AS Cook Lexington, \'a. 

Civil Engineering 

William Johk Cowart Lake, \'a. 

Civil Engineering 

Fred Carroll Culpepper, Jr. . . . Monroe, La. 
Civil Engineering 

William H. L'nion Darden . . Portsmouth, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

Richard David Daucheritv, Jr. . Fort Monroe, \'a. 
Civil Engineering 

Robert Hardin Deaderick . . Frederick^burg, \'a. 
Civil Engineering 

Dewitt Clinton Dominick . . Newburgh, N. Y. 
Liberal Jrts 

James Delwood Douglas Lodge, \'a. 

Prc-MeJical 

Thomas Nelms Downing .... Richmond, \'a. 
Pre-Medical 

Walter Ale.xander Edens . . . Petersburg, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

[131] 

18 3 9 







THE BOMB OF NINETEEN T H I D T Y - N I N E 




CLASS OF 1940 

RuFUS PuRDUM Ellett, Jr Roanoke, Va. 

Pre-Mrdicat 

Gordon Bradford English . . . Savannah, Mo. 
Cii'il En/jinceriny 

Andrew George Fali.att, Jr. . . Yonkers, N. Y. 
Civil EngiJifi'ring 

Charles James Faulkner, I\'. . . Richmond, Va. 
Chemistry 

Alfred Richard Flinn, Jr. . . . Austinville, Va. 
Civil Engxnf Cling 

Daniel Fort Flowers Findlay, O. 

Electrical Engineering 

Fred Fort Flowers Findlay, O. 

Ci-vil Engineering 

Charles Rudolph Floyd, Jr. . . • Roancke, Va. 
Cliemislry 

Walter Buhrman Garland, Jr. . . Roanoke, Va. 
Pre-Medical 

Sa.viuel Graham Gary, Jr Enid, Okla. 

Civil Engineering 

Bates McCluer Gilliam .... Lynchburg, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

William Charles Glover . Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Liberal Arts 

Howard Tyler Graber, Jr. . . . Detroit, Mich. 
Liberal Arts 

Eugene Bricgs Gray Dayton, O. 

Civil Engineering 

Walter Greenwood, Jr. . . . Montclair, N. J. 
Liberal Arts 

Wayland Sears Griffith, Jr. . . Hampton, Va. 
Electrical Engineering 

Elmer Heath Hammer, Jr Bristol, Va. 

Cliemistry 

George Ben Johnston Handy . . Richmond, Va. 
Pre-Medical 

[132] 



CLASS OF 1940 

Bknjamin Hurt llARnAUAv, III. . Micll.irid, fJa. 
f.'cz'// Uniiirii'iriitii 

Marshai.i, BuRHFii.r, llARl>^, JR. . . I.iiiiisvillc, Ky. 
Civil liui/iniiiiiiij 

Carleton Ai.len Harkradf.r .... Hristnl, Va. 
Lihnat .Ills 

Joseph D'Ai.ton Harris .... Petcrshurc, Va. 
Cliemistry 

John Lawrence Hart Roanoke, Va. 

Electrical Enc/inrerinfj 

John Edwin Barter, Jr Marshall, Tex. 

Liberal .Iris 

Ben Harvey, Jr Lynchburg, Va. 

Civil Engineering 

William Hamilton Harvey . Clifton Forge, Va. 
Chemistry 

Douglas Hampton Hatfield . . Shenandoah, Va. 
Cliemistry 

Dale Horstman Heely .... Portsmouth, Va. 
CJiemislry 

Joseph Criswell Hiett . . . Indian Head, Md. 
Cliemistry 

Charles Mason Hoge Frankfort, Ky. 

Civil Engineering 

Frank Wili.ard Hoover, Jr. . . . Bethesda, Md. 
Liberal .Iris 

Robert Cecil Horan Hartford, Conn. 

Chemistry 

Nelson Hill Hotchkiss .... Richmond, Va. 
Liberal .lets 

John Glenn Hundley . . . Charlottesville, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Gordon Cogswell Irwin, Jr. . Washington, D. C. 
Electrical Engineering 

Alien Key Keesee Helena, Ark. 

Civil Engineering 

[ 133] 

18 3 9 




I * 



■^l|'^# 



9 3 9 




THE BOMB Of NINETEEN T H i I! T Y - N I N E 

CLASS OF 1940 

•*r ijr** ^1 .. ' ".' "^ r'^^^Bti r*^!^^^! Joseph Wilson Kohnstamm . New Haven, Conn. 

fMtSM ;*_' ^ ,^^Hi,. 3»j*> "^ ^^^m Electrical Engineering 

\i^M\ '^'' ^^^ 

I .• -• - <S>!.5; 

/^^^jl^^^^^H V'^'^O^i^^^^^R ^'V^''^^^^l^^^^l Benjamin' Franklin Kump . . . £lk!ns, W. Va. 

^vM^^Bfli^H' ^<>C*jPJ^BPpW--3r- _'^^^'^^I|^^^^B Civil Engineerintj 

^ „^^ ^^ John Frederick Larrick . . . Middletown, Va. 

/^^^ £^^ 4^^^^ i '''"""''' 

' „ i»- * MkK" -su!* ' \ Chun Lau Canton, China 

,r'i "'^ ■'■ • - ■■^' ■ "a n- -I r • 

iv ■■ - I Civil Engineering 

<^; 

_,„ ,__ ^^ _^^^| \ I Malcolm Blanchar MacKinnon . Delmar, N. Y. 

^^^t^^Sf" ■■^■™''*?>^^"*^^^^^ ■ i^^ V s Liberal Arts 

William F. Mandt, III. . . . Charleston, W. Va. 

M I Tj_ I -^ p- J^S Frederick Devereux Marshall . . . Ruth, Nev. 

'C** -*^ \ li • -»> .**»■ Jl^ ' "■ "^ J^HH Ck'i/ Engineering 

•-^ '"^"^ -" 

Lester Donald M.wter, Jr Dallas, Tex. 

Liberal Arts 

-^'JD \ _^.«— ?;^H^K2HHMHB^^^i Donald Lowndes May . . . Washington, D. C. 

\ \ \ Phillip Blenner M.\y Richmond, Va. 

Chemistry 

Fred Carlton McCall Norton, Va. 

Pre-Medical 

George Grandstaff McCann, Jr. . Franklin, Va. 
Oiemistry 

m \ Jeari. Swain McCracken .... Bethlehem, Pa. 
V j«»t. - i Civil Engineering 

^^^T, "^ j^^^^H I ~~^ ;^^^^l Douglas Garvin McMillin . Chattano.^ga, Tenn. 

^\ ^^^^^H '^tV^^— .^^^^H Liberal Arts 

iV "■ t'C 

Ir-",— — H^^BKBH Robert Allen Merchant, Jr. . . . Norfolk, Va. 

Electrical Engineering 

4fi^^ ^1 t Crosby Park Miller Richmond, \ a. 

Civil Engineering 

^ ^^^^^■^■E' - - :% Frederick Colquhoun Miner . . Yonkers, N. Y. 

■~- a| Civil Engineering 

eii^y— ^5^^^B^B^^^^->..^i^^^ '^^^r^^^^^l Eari.e Watson Mitchell .... Baltimore, Md. 

~ Liberal Arts 




CLASS OF 1940 



KiLiiAKi) VVm.i.ack M()M.uki-; . . Alcxaiulri;i, Va. 
Civil luujiniiiinij 

Thomas Monxuri; Alexandria, Va. 

LihnttI .Ills 

RoBitRT Lord Morrison Staunton, Va. 

Pn-Mcdical 

Marion Robf.rts Morrisskti . . . Roanoke, Va. 
Civil Enijinrninij 

James Madison" Moser, Jr. . . Wa>hinj;tun, D. C. 
Prc-Mniical 

Bei.vev Washington Munov, Jr. . . Roanoke, Va. 
Chemislry 

Wii.MAM Nelson Albany, N. V. 

Pr,--Mi-dical 

EmviN O'Connor, Jr Fort Meade, S. D. 

Electrical E/ii/inrciiiu/ 

Thomas Ranson Opie Staunton, \'a. 

Liberal Arts 

Ulys Eugene Phillippi . . . Rural Retreat, Va. 
Chemistry 

Julian Euward Pitman, Jr. . . . Roanoke, \'a. 
Civil Eriffineerini/ 

R. G. Pollard, Jr. . . . Woodhaven, L. I., N. Y. 
Civil Engineering 

Eliot Pierre Young Powell . . Falls Church, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

William Saunders Powell .... Norfolk, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Richard H. Pritchett, Jr. . . . Lynchburg, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Sol Waite Rawls, Jr Franklin, \'a. 

Chemistry 

Marshall McC. Revnolos . ■ . Berryville, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

Robert Brooke Ritchie .... University, Va. 
Liberal Arts 





3 9 



THE BOMB Of N I N n E E N T II I D T Y - N I N E 




CLASS OF 1940 



Henry Latham Rucker, Jr. . . . Bedford, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

FERDiNAN'n T. Schneider, Jr. . Washington, D. C. 
Electrical Engineering 

Ralph Bayard Sessoms, Jr. . . . Richmond, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Horace Franklin Sharp, Jr. . . Richmond, Va. 
Chemistry 

Robert Nelson Shiverts . . Morris Plains, N. J. 
Liberal Arts 

Paul Clifford Shu Alexandria, Va. 

Civil Engineering 

William Gray Shultz . . . Chevy Chase, Md. 
Pre-Medical 

George Herbert Simpson, Jr. . ■ ■ Norfolk, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

David Patterson Smith . Edgewood Arsenal, Md. 
Cliemistry 

James Alexander Smith, HI. . . Richmond, Va. 
Cliemistry 

Robert Pemberton Smith .... Richmond, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

Thomas Earl Snyder . . Avon-by-the-Sea, N. J. 
Civil Engineering 

Frederick Howell Stevens . . Manchester, N. H. 
Chemistry 

Robert Louis Sweeney, Jr. . . . Portsmouth, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Preston Trigg Syme Petersburg, Va. 

Civil Engineering 

John Stafford Taylor Roanoke, Va. 

Civil Engineering 

Vester Jay Thompson, Jr Clayton, Mo. 

Civil Engineering 

John Payne Thrift Culpeper, Va. 

Chemistry 



ai 



CLASS OF 1940 



Francis Rawn Torkincion . . Cuiiiberlaml, Md. 
I.ihrral .his 

Jerrv Mac Totten Sherman, Tex, 

Civil linijiiinrinij 

Clarence Spotsuood Towi.es . . . Reedvillc, Va. 
Civil Enijimrrinij 

Andrew Lucius Turner, Jr. . . . Roanoke, Va. 
Civil Enffinnriruj 

Francher Terrell Turner .... Roanoke, Va. 
C/iemislry 

James Foster Turner .... Lynnhaven, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Isaac Toll VanPatten, III. . . . Norfolk, \'a. 
Civil Enijinecrinti 

SvDNEV A. Vincent, Jr. . . . Newport News, Va. 
Civil Enginet-ring 

LiNWOOD Vinson, Jr Norfolk, \'a. 

Chemistry 

Arthur L. Wadsworth, III. . . Portsmouth, Va. 
Clie/nistry 

Oliver Morse Walcott .... Alexandria, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

GoRUON Willis Walker .... Petersburg, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

Joseph Milton Walters, Jr. . . . Danville, Va. 
Chemistry 

William Allen Walton .... Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cliemistry 

Raymond Vincent Wasdell . . . Albany, N. Y. 
Civil Engineering 

Lewis Napoleon Waters Norfolk, Va. 

Pre-MeJical 

Clifton Stokes Weaver . . . New York, N. Y. 
Civil Engineering 

Edgar Vaul.x Weir Arlington, Va. 

Electrical Engineering 




I, ^ 

•MM 



THE BOMB OF NINETEEN T H I U V = N I N E 




CLASS OF 1940 

Rudolph Jules Weiss .... Ocean View, Va. 
Cii'il Ejiyinen'uuj 

RiCH.VRU Fr.anklin- Welton", 111. . Port^^mouth, Va. 
Ci'i'il En/jint't'nny 

C.^RL Gr.aves Wettersten" .... Dallas, Tex. 
Electrical Entjincering 

RoDERT Hugh White, III Atlanta, Ga. 

Clieinistry 

Donald Herbert Wills .... Lynchburg, Va. 
Chemistry 

Eaiu. Everett Wilsov, Jr Richmond, Va. 

Liberal Arts 




HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1940 



How long are three )ears? For a persoa 
who studies and records the history of the 
ages, it is an infinitesimal period. But for 
men as young as we are, who are interested 
only in our own individual histories and fu- 
tures, three years is an interminable era. How- 
ever, let us look back on the last three years 
as a group at V. M. I. Can any of us ac- 
count for the fact that time has flown in- 
stead of crept? We do not cover history 
on a large scale, but we can look back on a 
period of character-building and a period in 
which we have absorbed knowledge and ideals 
that will help us to mold our lives and to 
assume our responsibilities at V. M. I. Dur- 
ing our first class year we will seek to re- 
ceive that final polish that will fit us for what 
we are to face in the future. We find our- 
selves now about to climb to the fourth rung 
in the ladder of our careers at V. M. I. 

As a class we will have a great chance to 
distinguish ourselves throughout our first 
class year. Next year is V. M. I.'s centennial 
year, and we will be in the public eye. There- 
fore we will be responsible for setting a good 
e.xample and for upholding the standards 
that will be passed on to us. 

For three years we have been building up 
to the climax of being first classmen. We 
were together through a Rat year, a third 
class year and our second class year. The Rat 
year is more or less a haze, ended by a rapid 
and painful climb to the fourth stoop. After 
a summer furlough we greeted our Brother 
Rats, and as a class we went on from there. 



That year we were explosive, mischievous, and 
very good all-around trouble-makers. Finals 
again, and we were second classmen. Life 
took on a different aspect. Our brotherhood 
was a year older and we felt that year tre- 
mendously. We were finally a ranking class. 

When we came back in the fall of 1938, 
we were prepared to quiet down and apply 
ourselves to the more important parts of our 
life at V. M. I. We had to work harder to 
get through, and we had to apply ourselves 
more to get what we wanted. We started 
planning and waiting for our Ring Figure, 
which is one of the most important events in 
the life of a cadet at V. M. I. At this Ring 
Figure we receive a ring and something else 
— something that will make the ring more 
valuable to us as the years go by, make it 
embody and symbolize our lives and thoughts 
at and about V. M. I. — a kiss! 

We have now reached the end of a most 
successful second class year, and we have 
passed the greater amount of our trials and 
tribulations. We have lost some of our 
Brother Rats, but they will always remain 
with us in that capacity. We have been 
bound together by bonds forged from com- 
mon misfortunes and joys. We have worked 
and relaxed, always together, for a time long 
enough to prove each man and to become 
Brother Rats in the true sense of the word. 
Now we are ready to assume our roles as 
leaders of the men who represent the only 
place in which experiences such as ours have 
been are possible. 




NAVAS 
Vice-President 



T N 1 I! D (LASS 



THE BOMB Of N I H [ T t E 



T n R T y - N I N E 




CLASS OF 1941 



Charles Webb ABBirr .... Appomattox, Va. 
Eli-itricai Eni/irifcriny 

Abr.ah.^m Adi.er Petersburg, Va. 

Chemistry 

\V.\i.TER Febrev Arnold . . . Washington, D. C. 
EL-clrical Enginecriiuj 

Euxv.^RU AusriN"AuR.\SD, JR Cresson, Pa. 

Eli-clrical Enyuiecrinij 

John Willl\m Avler, Jr. . . Hilton Village, Va. 
Ci-vil Eiiyitivcrintj 

Cyrus McCormick Bache, Jr. . • Richmond, Va. 
Civil Engineerinij 

Fr.-\ncis Colper B.\ld\vin' Norfolk, Va. 

Civil Entjineering 

].\CK Lv.N-S' B.\LTHis Roanoke, Va. 

Civil Ent/inccring 

Carter Wilson BE.AiViER .... Hillsville, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

Thom.as Gordon Bennett, Jr. . . . Lusby, Md. 
Electrical Engineering 

Albert Alfred Blackmon .... Eufaula, Ala, 
Electrical Engineering 

Fletcher Cleme.nt Booker, Jr. . . Kingston, Pa. 
Liberal Arts 

John Webster Bowman Sikeston, Mo. 

Liberal Arts 

Edmund Bra.xton Bradford . . Hagerstown, Md. 
Electrical Engineering 

James Artemus Eranaman . . Waynesboro, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Philip Allen Brauer Powhatan, Va. 

Chemistry 

Lerov Neil Brown . . . Cleveland Heights, 0. 
Cliemistry 

Domenick Arthur Buonanno . . Trenton, N. J. 
Chemistry 

Charles Augustus Butler, Jr. . Philadelphia, Pa. 
Liberal Arts 

L.4WRENCE Brevard Cann, Jr. . . Richmond, Va. 
Electrical Engineering 

Edgar Frank Carney, Jr. . . . Churchland, Va. 
Electrical Engineering 

Ja.mes Scott Chalmers . . . Sand Springs, Okla. 
Cliemistry 

William Ian Charles St. Louis, Mo. 

Liberal Arts 

DuRi.AND Edward Clark, Jr. . . Strasburg, Va 
Electrical Engineering 

Harold Page Clark Waynesboro, Va 

Chemistry 

Joseph Howard Conduff Floyd, Va 

Liberal Arts 
Ja.mes Albert Cook, Jr Lexington, Va 

Pre-Medicat 

James Roy Dale, Jr Glamorgan, Va, 

Electrical Engineering 
Willis Jefferson Dance, Jr. . . . Danville, Va 

Electrical Engineering 

Hugh Ma.xwell Davisson, Jr. . . Renssjlaer, Ind 

Liberal Arts 
Barnard Mark Dirzulaitis . . . Universitv, Va 

Pre-Mcdical 

Samuel Witten Dobvns Norton, Va 

Civil Engineering 



[ 142] 



CLASS OF 1941 

ROBFRT [oSKPil 1)01. AMI . . Wcll^lcr (irnvi's, Mo. 

l're-M(iii(al 

Al.i.EN Edi.ok Donnan, III. . . . Ricluiioiul, Va. 
Civil li/iijinririiitj 

Guv Humpiirf:v nRKUR\, Jr. . . . LaC'ro^>c, \'a. 
lileclrical Enyinnrimj 

Chari.es AB.s.r;R Earnest, III. . . Portsmouth, \'a. 
Civil Ln(/iitrrriiu/ 

Ali.en Joseph Ei. lender, 1r Iloiima, La. 

l'ic-M,'A(cal 

Henrv Joyce Foresman . . . Prospect Park, Pa. 
Libi-ral .his 

Robert Allan Foster Peoria, III. 

Prc-M,'dicul 

Douglas Carter France, Jr. . Charlottesville, Va. 
Clifmistry 

EuwARu Whitehead Gali.owav . Lynchburg, Va. 
Clifmistry 

Hugh Robert Ganit Lynchburg, Va. 

Cliemistry 

William Allen Garneit . . . Cumberland, \'a. 
Electrical Entjinifrinij 

Henrv Burt Garrett, Jr Augusta, Ga. 

Civil Enijineerincj 

Francis James Gasquet . . . Wilkinson, Miss. 
Electrical Engineerinij 

Lawrence Davis Goldsmith . . Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Liberal Arts 

Charles Henrv (Jo.mpk .... Ale.xandria, Va. 
Electrical Engineerinij 

William K. Goolrick, Jr. . . Fredericksburg, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Fleming Clark CJoolsbv Marion, Va. 

Cliemistry 

David W.acner Goit .... Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Civil Engineering 

Frank Lamkin Grecorv Roanoke, Va. 

Civil Engineering 

Nelson Smith Groome, Jr. . . . Hampton, Va. 

Liberal Arts 
Hood Colbert Hampton, Jr. . . . Tampa, Fla. 

Pre-Medical 

TiRV HuBER Harroi), Jr., Aruba, Neth. West Indies 
Chemistry 

James Edwin Hensi.ev Lynchburg, Va. 

Chemistry 

Fred Bruce Hili Somerset, Ky. 

Civil Engineering 

Herman Riddick Hill, Jr Norfolk, Va. 

Electrical Engineering 

Lucius Davis Hill, III. . . . San Antonio, Tex. 

Pre-Medical 

Julian Fr.avel Hirst Purcellville, Va. 

Civil Engineering 

Seth Guilford Hobart, Jr Bristol, \'a. 

Pre-\Iedical 
Herbert Clyde Hoi.lida^ . . . Fall River, Mass. 

Liberal Arts 
Henrv Benj. Holmes, III. . . Washington, D. C. 

Electrical Engineering 
Gilder Stansburv Horne, Jr. . . Charlotte, N. C. 

Liberal Arts 

Frank Corbeit Horton, Jr. . . . Lynchburg, Va. 

Chemistry 

[143] 

18 3 9 




THE B 



B f 



I N E T E E N T N I U y - N I M E 




CLASS OF 1941 

Harry Gwin" Howtox .... Birmingham, Ala. 
Civil Enijincrintj 

Ch.\rles Edw.ard Hudson, Jr. . . Frederick, Md. 
Chemistry 

Pli.i.er Alex.wder Hughes, Jr. . Warrenton, Va. 
Civil Engine, liny 

Luther R. Huvett . . . Charles Town, W. Va. 
Chemistry 

Robert Henry Ingle, Jr Staunton, Va. 

Chemistry 

Wii.Li.AM M. Jackson, Jr. . . Fredericksburg, Va. 
Eleetrieal Enijineerinij 

Robert Vernon Jacobs . . Fort Clayton, Panama 
Civil Entjine. rintj 

Robert \^'ELI.FORu Jeffrey .... Arvonia, Va. 
Chemistry 

Alexander Larew Jett Akron, O. 

Chemistry 

\'enable Johnson Petersburg, Va. 

Civil Entjinetriny 

Joseph Michael Kain, Jr. . . . Richmond, Va. 
Electrical Engineering 

Frederick F. Kaiser . . . Maspeth, L. I., N. Y. 
Civil Engine, ring 

Ausi'iN Si'A.ATS KiBBEE, Jr. . Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
Chemistry 

Philip Henry Kii.ley Vivian, W. Va. 

Pre-MeAical 

Edward George King . . . Pennington Gap, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

Frank Langley Kirby .... Portsmouth, \'a. 
frc-Medieal 

Hugh Jett Lawrence Peru, Ind. 

Chemistry 

Lewis Archie Lillard Culpeper, Va. 

Chemistry 

Erik Price Littlejohn, Jr. . . . Marshall, Tex. 
Civil Engineering 

Frank Garreit Louthan, Jr. . . Richmond, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

Marion Dubois Lucas, Jr. . . . Florence, S. C. 
Liberal Arts 

JAS. L-AWRENCE W. MacRae . . . Richmond, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Robert Clark Maling . Edgewood Arsenal, Md. 
Chemistry 

Richard Coke Marshali Petersburg, Va. 

Civil Engine, ring 

Dandridge Wesley Marston .... Toano, Va. 
Civil Engine, ring 

John Lenoir Martin .... Birmingham, Ala. 
Cliemistry 

William Ray.mond Maxson .... Ambler, Pa. 
Civil Engineering 

William Savers McCaulev . . . Richmond, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

William B. McChesney . . Big Stone Gap, Va. 
Chemistry 

Alexander Ha.milton McKinney . Richmond, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Henry Edwards Mecredy, Jr. . . . Roanoke, Va. 
Electrical Engineering 

Raymond Samuel Meisel .... Baltimore, Md. 
Liberal Arts 

[144] 



CLASS OF 1941 

Ai.vis Fi-i.ix Mi:ii.n, Jk Slircx ciion, l,:i. 

(,'ivil liiiijiiic. I hill 

Eric Moifaji Mk'iKR . . , liirminnh.iMi, Miih. 
Uirniislt y 

CiiARi.i-s Lcf; Mobi.]:\ (Jnciivilk-, S. C. 

Life nil al l-.n/jin.irinn 

SiiiRl.HV AuGUSiLis MODISETT .... I.urav, Va. 
Civil Enyinirriiuj 

CiiARi.i;s Ei.i.Ei Moore, Jr RicliTiiniul, \'.i. 

Chemistry 

RiLiiARi) Li:ii Moriartv .... The Plains, \'a. 
Cliimislry 

Ai.BERi 15. Morrison, Jr. . . C'larkslnir);, W. \'a. 
Clirniislry 

Dan Joseph Morton Columlius, (ia. 

tlcctrical Enyinrrrinij 

L. MUNNIKHUVSEN, jR. . . . Newport News, V'a. 
Electrical En/jinrrring 

Lee Mani.v Nance Rnxlniry, \'a. 

Civil Eiiijinrrrinij 

Charles Francis Nash .... Portsmouth, Va. 
Pre-Mcdical 

Stanley Ralph Navas .... Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Civil Enijinr. rititj 

Carroll Thomas Neale, Jr. . . West Point, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

James Franklin Neelv, Jr Tulsa, Okla. 

Civil Eni/inecrin// 

Andrew Lesi.ie Nelson . . . Lewisburg, \V. \'.t. 
Civil Enijineerimj 

Frederick George Nelson, Jr. . . . Nutley, N. j. 
Civil Engineerinij 

Ellis Frederick Newton .... Powhatan, Va. 
Electrical Engineerinij 

Earnest Jackson Oglesbv, Jr. . University, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

Herbert Dean Oliver, Jr Atlanta, CJa. 

Chemistry 

Charles Freeman Owens . . . Cumberland, Md. 
Pre-Mcdical 

John Cunningham Palmer .... SufFolk, \'a. 
Electrical Engineerinij 

Joseph Lamar Parrish, Jr. . Old Hickory, Tenn. 
Clie/nislry 

John Gray Paul, Jr Roanoke, Va. 

Liberal Arts 

Oren Hutchinson Persons, Jr. . . . Merion, Pa. 
Chemistry 

George Booker Peters Hampton, \'a. 

Civil Engineering 

John Lee Pitts, Jr Montclair, N. J. 

Electrical Engineering 

Henry Austin Pollard Woodhaven, L. L, N. V. 
Liberal Arts 

MiNTON Albert Prideau.x .... Ciraham, Tex. 
Prc-Mcdical 

Robert Barclay Ragland . . . Jacksonville, Fla. 
Electrical Engineering 

\\'ii LiAM Barksdai.e Randolph . Alexandria, \a. 

Liberal Arts 
Leo Rashkin Mountaindale, N. Y. 

Prr-Medical 
Beverley Money Read .... Lexington, Va. 

I-iberal Arts 

f 145] 

18 3 9 




^^-^ ^^iBH^S ., 









I h 




THE BOMB Of NINETEEN T H I D T Y - N 





^ f^ ^'% 




CLASS OF 1941 

William G. Rewolus, Jr. . . Centre Cross, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Rov Warren Replogle .... Fort Monroe, Va. 
Ch'U Engineering 

Raymond Francis Reutt Norfolk, Va. 

Electrical Engineering 

Harrison H. C. Richards, Jr. . Washington, D. C. 
Electrical Engineering 

Walter Leland Richards, Jr. . . Spokane, Wash. 
Pre-MeJical 

William Edward Richardson . . Pitman, N. J. 
Civil Engineering 

George Burgess Richmond Huntington, W. Va. 

Civil Engineering 

John Garland Robinson, Jr. . . . Norfolk, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

Charles L. Rockwood . . Edgewood Arsenal, Md. 
Liberal .Iris 

Alfred Joseph Rooklin .... Covington, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

Julian Keith Rose Arlington, Va. 

Chemistry 

John Barrett Rudulph . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Cliemislry 
Geo. Albert Sancken, Jr Augusta, Ga. 

Cliemistry 
Calvin Satterfield, HI Petersburg, Va. 

Chemistry 
Howard Lewis Satterwhite . . . Lynchburg, Va. 

Chemistry 
James Fiske Searcy .... Washington, D. C. 

Electrical Engineering 
Stuart Manly Beaton Staunton, Va. 

Chemistry 

Luther Leonard Sexton Deel, Va. 

Civil Engineering 

Gerald Hugh Shea La Jolla, Calif. 

Civil Engineering 

James Leroy Shelby El Dorado, Ark. 

Electrical Engineering 

George Walter Shei.horse Luray, Va. 

Chemistry 

Ralph Siecel Alexandria, Va. 

Electrical Engineering 

Manley Olin Simpson, Jr. . . . Front Royal, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

Elmer Oswald Smith, Jr. . . . Alexandria, Va. 
Pre-Medical 

Floyd Shelton Smith Cleveland, O. 

Chemistry 

Sydney Williamson Smith . . . Lexington, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

Joseph Alfred Sosbee, Jr. . . . Little Rock, Ark. 
Civil Engineering 

Robert L.\wrence Spear .... Flushing, N. Y. 
Electrical Engineering 

Augustus Rudd Spencer Norfolk, Va. 

Civil Engineering 

H. E. Stencele, HL . Brooklyn Navy Yard, N. Y. 
Civil Engineering 

Andrew Loy Stewart, Jr. . . . Alexandria, Va. 
Electrical Engineering 

Claude Augustus Stokes, Jr. . Front Royal, Va. 
Liberal Arts 

[146] 



CLASS OF 1941 

FKi;i)i:KrcK Nash Sikudvmck, Jk. . . Rirlniinrul, V;i. 
('ivil linijinriiinij 

Kdwaki) Adam Siumpi-, III. . . , Riiluiinnd, \'.i. 
Clinnistry 

Wu.l.lAM Sui-II.K Ncupnrl Nfu>, \'a. 

PrL'-Mcdicat 

JosF.PU RoDNEV SvvP/niNiC, Jr. . . I.a( iranni-, 111. 
Elcclr'tcal Enyinnr'unj 

Stkphes' Hatiiawav Swift .... Miltcpii, Maw. 
Civil Etii/infrriiiii 

John' Marsiiai.i. Tai.iai-krro, Jr. . . Rapidan, Va. 
Clinnistry 

Joe Svunev Thompson' Sherman, Tlx. 

Liberal Arts 

Paul Jones Thomson, Jr. . . New Orleans, I, a. 
Civil Enijincerinij 

Thomas Lee Thrasher, Jr. . . , Riclimonil, \'a. 
Clicmislry 

Harold Glenn Tipton .... St. diaries, Va. 
Civil Enijincirinij 

Harold Eugene Trask . . . WilminKtim, N. C. 
Chemistry 

Richard Edward Traver . . Collingswond, N. J. 
Civil Entjincering 

Gr.attan Howard Tucker, Jr. . Chase Citv, Va. 
Pre-Medical 

Brvon William Walker . . . BIytheville, Ark. 
Civil En/jineeriiiij 

Arthur Thomas Weiss Albany, N. "i'. 

Chemistry 

George Peters Welch . . . New Haven, Conn. 
Liberal .Irts 

James Clifton Wheat, Jr. . . . RichriKind, \'a. 
Civil Ene/ineeriiuj 

Warren Thomas White, Jr. . . . Norfolk, Va. 
Pre-Medical 

Keith Willis Roanoke, \'a. 

Civil Engineerinij 

William Allen Willis Augusta, Ga. 

Civil Engineering 

Walter Brownlee Wilson, Jr. . . Staunton, Va. 
Civil Engineering 

William Gilbert Wood .... Kingston, N. Y. 
Citemistry 

Robert Thompson Wright .... Norfolk, \'a. 
Liberal Arts 




Cl. r"L a 




CL3«0 




THIRD CLASS HISTORY 



Tradition seems to deem that every third 
class should be the disruptive factor in the 
peace of barracks. Ours was no exception. 
The long, enforced quietude of our Rathood 
had seen to that long before even we had 
realized it, and the brief respite of our first 
Finals had served but to light the fuse. The 
explosion was to follow! 

Thus September rolled around again and 
saw the return of the brothers, some few 
missing, to try their hand at being old cadets. 
Which one of us will ever live to forget the 
wild happenings of those first few weeks with 
the incoming Rats, instigation of shirt-tail pa- 
rades, fireworks, and the like? But the 
novelty of this soon wore off, and, faced with 
the Institute's most difficult academic year, 
we settled down to a more normal view of life 
in barracks. Strangely enough, those phases 
of V. M. I. life which we had so despised the 
year before suddenly took on new meaning, 
and from the start we became the most vig- 
orous proponents of Rat regulations and 
third class "importance." 

The fall of the year also brought new ex- 
periences along with the satisfaction of see- 
ing our own classmates take an important 
part in all varsity athletic competition. Open- 
ing Hops and the world premiere of "Brother 
Rat" were followed by our first out-of-state 
corps trip to Charlotte, certainly the best 
ever. Thanksgiving again found us in 
Roanoke for the V. P. I. game, not so dis- 
appointing as our first, and the worst weather 
of our time here. The following night we 
were suddenly shocked with the realization 
that only one short year separated us from a 
long-awaited goal — Ring Figure — the final 
crown in the mold of every class. We felt 
a little older, a little closer. 



Thanksgiving's snows faded into bleak De- 
cember, which brought that unforgettable 
Christmas — then an eager expectation, now a 
glorious memory. With the holidays once 
behind us, we were faced with the hardest 
prospect of a cadet's life — that unbroken five 
and one-half months stretch 'til Finals. Per- 
haps it was to break this monotony, or maybe 
just because we were third classmen, that the 
familiar "Bomb in the Courtyard!" began to 
ring out, and we each had that strange satis- 
faction of knowing too much about it all. 

The rest is history. Each one of us has his 
own version. Mid-year exams, basketball and 
wrestling, mid-winter hops, and plans for our 
ring had come and gone before we could 
realize it. Spring, with its long, warm days 
and green fields, once again brought track 
and baseball, government inspection, white 
ducks, spring hike, and finally V. M. I's 
greatest Finals, that marking its centennial. 

Looking back now we cannot help but ex- 
perience a somewhat mixed emotion — amuse- 
ment, pride, and sadness. Behind us now 
lies the most carefree and unsettled year of 
our time at V. M. I.; behind us lie the deeds 
of our classmates to which we may un- 
ashamedly point with a feeling of satisfac- 
tion; but what is more, behind us lie the 
events and associations which have molded 
us into a class of which we are justly proud, 
the events and associations which have created 
a sense of brotherhood and friendship which 
can never be replaced. An invaluable her- 
itage has been ours, a heritage of which we 
have tried to make the most to prepare us for 
the greater trials and responsibilities which 
lie ahead. Thus it is that we end our third 
class year — a little older, a little wiser, and 
looking forward. 




f U H H (LASS 



THE BOMB Of NINETEEN T H i I! T Y - N I N E 




CLASS OF 1942 

David Thomas Aston Dover, N. J. 

Barnabas Wii.i.iam Baker . . . Portsmouth, Va. 
Richard Baldwin . . Manila, Philippine Islands 

John Richard Banks Ne\vark, N. J. 

Ernest Moore Barber, Jr. . . . Memphis, Tenn. 
Frank Dorn Barclav, Jr. . . Schenectady, N. Y. 
Cyril Bassich, Jr. . . . Fort Sam Houston, Tex. 
Charles Hard Beckham .... Lakeland, Fla. 

Tams Bi.xbee, ni Muskogee, Okla. 

Robert Tvier Bland, Jr West Point, Va. 

William John Boehmer .... Buffalo, N. Y. 

Carroll Jordan Bounds Norfolk, Va. 

William Norman Brown .... Staunton, Va. 

Brlce Burnett Roanoke, Va. 

Ralph E. Bvrd, Jr Citronelle, Ala. 

Paul Carrington Cabell . . . Gaits Mills, Va. 
Dan David Cameron .... Wilmington, N. C. 
John Walter Carmine .... Petersburg, Va. 
Carter Nelson C.wlett .... Hampton, Va. 
James Elliott Che.^tham . . . Evergreen, Va. 
Charles Carpenter Ciiewninc . . Bon Air, Va. 
Earl N. Chiles, Jr. . . Natural Bridge Sta., Va. 
Addison Hodges Clark . . . Ellicott City, Md. 

Calhoun Coles Clay Roanoke, Va. 

Cecil Powell Coburn . . Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Ross Wallace Coe, Jr Ardmore, Okla. 

David Steel Conner Wayne, Pa. 

John Wadsworth Consolvo . . . Norfolk, Va. 

Joseph Long Cormany, Jr Roanoke, Va. 

Andrew Headlev Cowart Lake, Va. 

Fields Mack Co.x, Jr Independence, ^'a. 

Blandy Lewis Crafton .... Hagerstown, Md. 

[150] 



CLASS OF 1942 

Chari.ks L. C'ranf:, Jk. . . CHark-s J'cuvri, W. \'a 
RiciiAKii I5k\am ('Knr'i.i:^' . . . ^'ouriiistnwii, (J 

Daiiar Curv, Jk Nnrturi, \'a 

EuuARu Low NDiiS Davis, Jk Berwick, Pa 

Theodore Young Davis Norfolk, \'a 

Chari.es James Deaiii,, III. . . Leavcrnvorth, Kaii, 

JOH.N' Broadus Dh.i.ari), Jr Oxford, O. 

Wii.i.iAM Edwarij Dooean- . . Wa^hiiiKton, D. C. 

James Lee Dorrier Scottsville, Va. 

Chester Mvrick Drake, Jr Austin, Tex. 

Joseph Samuel Drewrv, Jr Boykins, \'a. 

Robert Ellsworth Dunlap . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LuciAN A. Durham, Jr Roanoke, \'a. 

Joe Emerv Edens Petersburg, Va 

William S. EmvARns, IIL . . Birmingham, Ala 
John- Yates Embrev .... Fredericksburg, Va 

George Hvndman Esser, Jr Norton, \'a 

Walter Lee Evans, Jr Lvnchburg, Va 

Willlam Frederick Flood, Jr. . . Annapolis, Md, 
Ed\vard John Fogartv, Jr. . . . Savannah, Ga, 

Gordon Clinton Folkes Norfolk, Va. 

Chris Eugene Fonvielle . . Wilmington, N. C. 
MuRL Edmund Fui.k, Jr. . . . East Palestine, O. 
Paul Xavier Gearv, Jr. . . . Washington, D. C, 
William Haves Gettv . . . Port Huron, Mich. 
Theophilus Field Gilliam . . Prince George, Va. 
Alfred Parker Goddin, Jr. . . . Richmond, \'a. 
Robert Wilbur Goodman, Jr. . . Galveston, Tex. 
Edwin Stewart Granger . . . Lexington, Va. 
Joseph Hamilton Grant, Jr. . Fort McKinley, Me. 

Roger Keith Grav Ardmore, Okla. 

Kent Pavne Gravbeal Marion, Va. 

C151 ) 








9 3 9 



THE BOMB Of NINETEEN T II I D T Y - N I N E 




CLASS OF 1942 

Arthur McIntvre Grindi.e . . Lexington, Mass. 
Robert Lancaster Guv .... Richmond, Va. 

Joseph Addison Hagan, Jr Norfolk, Va. 

John Coulter Halv Louisville, Ky. 

Howard Lee Harris, Jr Petersburg, Va. 

Stanlev Cooper Harrold .... Napa, Calif. 
George Widmever Heath, Jr. . . . Nuttall, Va. 
Louis Armistead Heindl, Jr. . . . Centralia, Va. 
Spencer Thurston Hockadav . . . Lanexa, Va. 
Shirlev Thomas Holland, Jr. . . Windsor, Va. 
John Clvde Hooker, Jr. . . . Martinsville, Va. 
Ravmond Edwin Horn, Jr. . . San Benito, Tex. 
Richard C. Horne, HL . West Falls Church, Va. 
Davis Monroe Howerton, Jr. . . . Ashland, Ky. 
John Anderson Hughes, Jr. . . Kents Store, Va. 

James Hume, Jr Richmond, Va. 

Richard Hall Jeschke, Jr. . . . Arlington, Va. 
Edward Hamilton Jones . . . Dumbarton, Va. 

Fred Charles Jones Phoen'x, Ariz. 

Meriwether Jones Richmond, Va. 

Thomas Ralph Jones, Jr Norfolk, Va. 

John Ale.xander Jordan . . . Portsm-'uth, Va. 

Clvde Douglas Kelso, Jr Laurel, Miss. 

Ernest Ludwig Keppel .... Richmond, Va. 

Everett Glenn King Columbus, Ga. 

Edwin Vernon King Columbus, Ga. 

Herbert B. Kinsolvinc, HL . . Shelbyville, Ky. 
Clifford CSuv Knick .... Collierstown, Va. 

Charles Ross Lapp Dallas, Pa. 

Frank Jones Lee Wichita Falls, Tex. 

John Dozier Lee, Jr Sumpter, S. C. 

Llovd Lorenzo Leech, Jr. ... Arlington, Va. 

[ 152] 



CLASS OF 1942 

RoiiKKi I'lioKMOS I.i:mmo\, Jk. . I,\ iii'lilniin, V';i. 

Caki.I': I.onriiW I.khis . . ParkfivlnirH, W. \'a. 

RoiiiKi AucisiLS l.i'Uis . . . San Diet^u, Calif. 

Wii.i.iAM Dallas Lillard .... Orange, V'a. 

Fri:i) William Lovk .... Dclray Beach, Fla. 

John EinvARi) Lom), Jr. . Natural Bridge Sta., Va. 

Charles Ei.ihu Lvman, III. . Miilcllefield, Conn. 

Aruiur Dellkrt I.^^■^■, Jk. . . . Pcirtsmouth, O. 

James Russell Major Riverton, Va. 

John W.aits Marjin, Jr. . . Virginia Beach, \'a. 
Joseph James M.^tihews, Jr. . . . Hampton, Va. 
John Knudson McCullouch . Birmingham, Ala. 
James Andrew McDonough . . . Richmond, Va. 

Burt Charles Menk Cleveland, O. 

Robert Edward Lee Michie . . . Lubbock, Tex. 
Angelo Roger Milio .... New York, N. Y. 
Charles Bruce Mu.ler .... Richmond, Va. 
Jerry McGill Mu.ls .... Brentwood, Tenn. 
Gordon Eldridce Moore . . . Fort Howard, Md. 

Waverlv Moore Ellerson, Va. 

Donald MacMillan Morse . . . Augusta, Me. 
Claree Sutton Mullen, Jr. . . Richmond, Va. 

Joseph Mullen, Jr St. Louis, Mo. 

Melvin Ross Myron .... Port Huron, Mich. 
Louis VanLoan Nais.awald . Garden City, N. Y. 

Hugh Rodney Nevitt Houston, Tex. 

Wn.LL\.M Eugene Nichols .... Dallas, Tex. 
William Bernard Nugent .... Ettrick, Va. 

David Ramsey Oakey Salem, Va. 

Ja.mes O'Keeffe, Jr Roanoke, Va. 

Cecil Wray Pace, Jr Coke, Va. 

Bryant Beverley Pake .... Altheimer, Ark. 

[ 153] 

18 3 9 




THE BO 



Of H I N [ T E E H T H I R T y ■ N I N E 




CLASS OF 1942 

Sumner Mai.one Park am . . . Henderson, N. C. 
Lawrence Turkbull Parker . . . Hampton, Va. 

John Mercer Patiok Richmond, Va. 

Roi.LA Daniki, Paiton, Jr. . . . Brighton, N. Y. 
Joseph Ashbridce Perkins, Jr. . . Coatesville, Pa. 
George Edward Pickett, IV. . . Charlotte, N. C. 
Irving Bowen Pierce, Jr. . . . Lexington, Mass. 

Warren Horton Pike, Jr Hobart, Ind. 

Frederick William Poos .... Arlington, Va. 
Lewis Gordon Porter, Jr. . . . Alexandria, Va. 

William Ira Powers, Jr Augusta, Ga. 

Elliott D. Prescott, Jr. . North Muskegon, Mich. 
Abisha Collins Pritchard .... Hopewell, Va. 
Charles Henrv Purdum, Jr. . . . Syracuse, Ind. 
John H.ager Randolph, Jr. . . . Richmond, Va. 

David Luiher Rawls, Jr Suffolk, Va. 

Richard Courtney Reed Norfolk, Va. 

George Hearn Rhea .... Nashville, Tenn. 
Francis Preitvman Rhett . . . Charleston, S. C. 
Mario Francis Rico . . Long Island City, N. Y. 

Edward Day Risdon Warrenton, Va. 

James Morris Satterfiei.d . . . Petersburg, Va. 
Charles Stuart Sexton, Jr. . . Wilkinsburg, Pa. 
Paul Randolph Sheahan, Jr. . . Charlotte, N. C. 
Joseph Lawrence Shomo .... Ambrldge, Pa. 

Harry John Siebert Richmond, Va. 

Barney Joseph Ski.adany, Jr. . . Plymouth, Pa. 

Frank Steed Smith, Jr Leonia, N. J. 

Henry Ellison Snedeker . . . Wilmington, Del. 
Rutherford II. Spessard, Jr. . . . Richmond, Va. 
\\'oriiiam Anderson Spii.man, Jr. . Richmond, Ya. 
Lloyu Robert Stallings . . . Cumberland, Md. 

[154] 



CLASS OF 1942 



lIoHAKi) Samuhi, SiRAUSSKK .... Ri-ailiriu, P;i. 
Amjrku Stumpf New ^■(lrk, N. V. 

AMBr.KR (ir.AZlBRnOK SUI IIKRI.AM) . Rlianiikl', 

Henrv Ci.mON Sl iiiKRr.AM) , Cliflon For(;c, 



EinvARi) Wright S\\ajn' 
Ralph Hum. Swkcker 
R. W. D. Tavi.or, Jr. . 
John Lkwis Tjiackkr . 
Herbert M. Thornton- 



N'ictiiria, 

Cralibottom, 

WncKlbi-rry Forest, 

. . rharlcston, \V. 

. \'irginia I^each, 



Carlo Ralph Tosti Buffalo, N. Y. 

Amon Dean Tuck Scranton, Pa. 

Charles Thomas Urquhart, Jr. . . Norfolk, Va. 

James Edward Vestal Athens, Tenn. 

Alfred \'ick. III Hampton, Va. 

Ernest Henry Wahlert, Jr. . . Normandy, Mo. 
DeMelt Eugene Walker . . . Clreenport, N. V. 
WiLLLAM Benjamin Walker . . Richmond, \'a. 
Robert Dade Wall ... . Henderson, N. C. 

Ralph Albert Weller . . . New York, N. Y. 
George Snyder White, Jr. . . Maplewood, N. J. 
John Edward Whitmore .... Staunton, Va. 
Charles Henri Wii.kins . . \\'ashington, D. C. 

Alton Gus Williams Suffolk, Va. 

Ai.E.VANDER H. Williams .... Richmond, Va. 
CJrover C. Williams, Jr. . . . Baskerville, Va. 

Robert Hintov Williams Driver, Va. 

Richard Powh.wan Williams . . . Hollis, N. Y. 
Robert W. Williams . . East Falls Church, Va. 
Thomas W. Williamson . . . Harrisonburg, Va. 
Charles Perry Wilson . . . Clifton Forge, Va. 
JA.MES Truesdell Wii.son, Jr. . . Monticello, Ky. 
Thomas James Wilson, HI. . Clifton Forge, Va. 




THE BOMB Of 



N E T E E N T El I I! T y - H I N E 



f ,f # 




CLASS OF 1942 

Walter Elliott Woelper .... Newark, N. J. 
Jons- EjnviN Woodward, Jr. . . . Richmond, Va. 

John Minor Wrav, Jr Richmond, Va. 

John Mariix Wright Norfolk, Va. 

Charles Morion \'ol'nc, Jr. . Rocky Mount, Va. 
Ki;\\ ari) BiCKEORi) VoLiNG, Jr. . . . Danville, Va. 
William Martin Zmeeker . Hackettstown, N. J. 




HISTORY OF THE FOURTH CLASS 



One sunny day last September, the twelfth 
to be exact, V. M. I. was introduced to the 
class of nineteen forty-two as we formed for 
the first time on that most eventful day of 
our lives. For several weeks after our ar- 
rival, confusion was the keynote of our ex- 
istence. The mad scramble at every bugle 
call as at the many mysterious turnouts will 
remain only as humorous memories in years 
to come. Our days were filled with drilling 
and drawing equipment, while at night we 
listened to words of advice from the facu'ty 
and gathered an inkling of the importance of 
our institution in history. 

Thmgs gradually unraveled for us as the 
days went by. October came, and with it the 
Corps trip to Charlotte. On that trip we 
learned two things. The first was the expe- 
rience of being old cadets, if only for two 
days. The second and more important was 
that we saw and felt for the first time the 
real fighting spirit of V. M. I., which en- 
abled us to come from behind and tie a 
highly rated Clemson team. Not long after- 
wards, we were introduced to those swell V. 
M. I. hops at openings. These were followed 
by numerous football games and cheer rallies 
and finally the colorful torchlight parade be- 
fore we met V. P. I. Then the trip to 
Roanoke the next day and the game itself, in 
which the two teams battled to a tie in the 
flurries of snow. The following evening we 
added another experience to our increasing 
knowledge of the Institute as we witnessed 
our first Ring Figure. We were impressed 
by its beauty, and we anticipated some day 
having one of our own. That same week- 
end we were allowed the privilege of walking 
out of the Ratline, so we felt again for the 
moment the joy of being old cadets. 



The following weeks, when the excitement 
had died down, we began to count the days 
until Christmas in earnest. This yearning 
for the holidays was increased even more by 
the first big resurrection of the third class. 
Finally the day arrived, and we rushed down 
the stairs and out the arch on our way home 
for the happiest and shortest twelve days of 
our lives. It really felt comfortable to don 
civilian clothes once more. All too soon our 
time was up and we had to return again. We 
were truly a solemn bunch on the night of 
January third as we looked back on the good 
times we had had and looked forward to the 
long months of Rathood still ahead. 

Days dragged and weeks lagged as we pre- 
pared for exams. At last they were success- 
fully weathered with only a few casualties. 
The strain of study was relieved for a while 
by the Midwinter Hops. Then there were 
wrestling matches, basketball games, and 
shows in J. M. Hall to attend. The davs 
began to fly by, faster and faster. Before 
we knew it, spring had come, and the garri- 
son reviews and inspections that accompanied 
Easter Hops had passed. On the spring hike 
we met new difficulties and overcame them. 
Overcoats and grey pants were put awav as 
we donned white ducks and rounded the last 
bsnd that put finals in sight. At last the 
long-awaited day of our dreams arrived when 
we fought our way up the steps to the status 
and privileges of old cadets. 

Our goal for the present had been 
achieved, so we relaxed completeh' and en- 
joyed those wonderful experiences that onlv 
the finals of Rat year can bring. Now we 
can hitch our wagon to a higher star with 
new anticipations in the coming year as third 
classmen. 





I L I T A I! y 




MAJOR-GENERAL EDWARD W. NICHOLS 

1907-1924 




Born Peter-burg, Virginia, June 27, 1858; student Hume 
and Cook's School, 1866-'69; student McCabe's School, 
1869-74; entered V. M. I. in 1874, graduating in 1878 
with fourth stand in class of 24, and as a Cadet Lieu- 
tenant; studied Law under tutors and at the LJniversity 
of West Virginia; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 
V. M. I., 1878-'81; practicing lawyer in Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, 1881; Professor of Mathematics, V. M. I., 1890- 
1907; author of Nichols' Analytical Geometry and of 
Nichols' Differential and Integral Calculus; associated 
with the American Reporter International Railway Con- 
gress in scientific investigation; member of the Virginia 
Geological Society; member of the Society Promoting 
Engineering Education; member of the Committee 
of College Presidents on Summer Camps; Superintendent 
of V. M. I., 1907-1924. 



JACKSON STATUE, 1912 



JACKSON MEMORIAL HALL 



il 




WALKER 
Regimental Sergeant Maior 
BROWNLEY HARDY 

Color Guard Color Sergeant 



BALDWIN 

Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant 

HARDAWAY CARTER 

Color Sergeant Color Guard 



THE COLORS 



T N E BOMB OF NINETEEN T H I I! T Y - N I N E 



THE REGIMENTAL STAFF 




GRIFFIN 

Captain Adjutant . 


Regin- 


IRVING 

ental Comm 


ander 


[164] 


HASTINGS 
Captain S-3 


Qua 


HAISLIP 
rtermaster Captain 




TIDWELL 

Lieutenant Adjutant 



CHILES 

attalion Commande 



WELTON 
Sergeant Majc 



THE FIRST BATTALION STAFF 



THE SECOND BATTALION STAFF 

a 




KADICK 
Lieutenant Adjutant 



BOND 

attalion Comnnande 



h i 



wm 



TOnEN 

Sergeant Kiajo 



3 9 



T H [ BOMB Of N I N U E t N T H i I! T Y - N I N E 



COMPANY "A," CAVALRY 



THE STAFF 

W. ]\I. Echols Captain 

H. W. Ellerson First Lieutenant 

R. I. Beale Seeond Lieutenant 

R. L. Irby ... ... Seeond Lieutenant 

G. B. Vivi.AN Seeond Lieutenant 

J. P. Thrift First Sergeant 

T. N. Downing Supply Sergeant 



BEALE 
IRBY 

VIVIAN 

ond Lieutenants 






SERGEANTS 



S. H. Br.aznell 
T. N. Downing 
W. Greenwood 
J. M. Moser 



R. D. Daugherit'i 
E. B. Gray 
C. J. Faulkner 
J. A. Augustine 

P. T. SVME 



CORPORALS 



T. L. Thrasher 
A. A. Blackmon 
W. S. McCauley 
W. F. Arnold 
C. E. Moore 
G. H. Drewry 
J. C. Palmer 



W. T. White 
W. G. Rennolds 
H. E. Stengele 
D. J. Morton 
T. G. Bennett 
H. B. Holmes 
F. S. Smith 




ECHOLS, Capta 




ELLERSON, First Lieutc 



The "overgrown" Cavalry lads this year are a typical example of the V. M. I. product of co- 
operation and ability. At the beginning of last year they rated a distinct last in ths Garnett- 
Andrews competition. Since that unfortunate period of athletic and military depression the high- 
riding military cowboys have put on a whirlwind performance and now are in the very thick of 
the hotly contested fight for first place. From their able Commander to the most insignificant pri- 
vate in the ranks, they have all really "put out" for "A" Company. There have been the usual 
good times, the trifling, and all the other little incidents that so endear a man to his company, but 
when the pressure was on, every man was ready and eager to deliver all that was expected of 
him, and a little more besides. "A" Company has been especially outstanding this year in intra- 
murals and has walked away with far more than its share of first lines. The high quality of its 
officers is evidenced by ths great number of its personnel chosen for staff duty and for details on 
special occasions. 




RST Class 


Vv'. A. Sutherland 


CM. Oakey 


C. E. Babcock 


E. R. Taylor 


R. H. Pritchett 


J. M. Carpenter 


N. M. Walket 


S. W. Rawls 


P. W. Chase 


G. G. Weston 


G. H. Simpson 


H. C. Davis 


J. M. Woolf 


W. G. Shute 


F. S. Diuguid 


Second Class 


R. N. Shivcrts 


H. C. Dunton 


H. Bernstein 


R. L. Sweeney 


R. H. Firrey 


]. A. Branaman 


J. R. Talhott 


C. M. Lillle 


J. M. Camp 


C. S. Towles 


W. H. McCarthy 


J. D. Cook 


F. T. Turner 


W. C. Mitchell 


R. P. EUett 


J. F. Turner 


J. Pasco 


B M. Gilliam 


L. Vinson 


G. K. Slaughter 


W. Nelson 


D, H. Wills 



PRIVATES 





H. L- Satterwhi 


s 


A, L. Ste\*-att 


L Martin 


M. O. Simpsor 
G. H. Tucker 


R. Maxson 


T. C. 'S'heat 


B. McChesnev 
T. Neale 
J. Oglesbv 
L. Pitts 


Fourth Cl_ass 

B. W. Baker 
■«•. ]. Boehmet 

C. C. Che«-nin£ 


B. Raeland 


1. W- Consolvo 


B. Randolph 


D. Cur^■ 




, \\ , Gocsimii: 

. L. Guv 

. T. Holland 
. E. Home 

. C. Icnes 

I. Tones 

[. R. Nivrcn 

M. Patton 
. D. Prescort 
I. F. Rico 

M. Satrenield 
[, J. Siebert 



F. S. Stniri! 
H. E. Sneieker 
R. H- Sressard 
W. A- S:ri^=3= 
L. R- S-l i - r js 
T. L. Thicker 
T. E. Vesra! 
b. E- Wilier 
C. H. \S-iikiis 
R. W. Williass 
C. P- WiL«c= 
T, E. Wc>cvi--^-c 
L M. Wrsv 



THE BOMB Of NINETEEN T H I D T V = N I N E 



COMPANY "B," INFANTRY 



THE STAFF 
P. W. RiDDLEBERGER Captain 

C. L. Burgess First Lidiimaut 

J. S. Magoffix Second Licutinant 

E. C. Moses Second Lieutenant 

A. H. Morrison Second Lieutenant 

D. H. Heelv First Sergeant 

P. C. Shu Supply Serjeant 



MAGOFFIN 

MOSES 
MORRISON 

Second Lieutenants 




SERGEANTS 

W. J. COWART J. W. KOHNSTAAIM 

E. P. Y. Powell M. B. MacKinnon 

C. P. Miller J. C. Hiett 

D. H. Hatfield M. M. Reynolds 

R. B. Sessoms 



CORPORALS 

M. A. Prideaux 
E. F. Carney 
B. W. Walker 
R. V. Jacobs 

J. L. SHELB-i- 

L. L. Sexton 



B. M. Read 

E. A. Aurand, ji 

H. R. Hill 

D. W. Marston 

S. W. Smith 

I. F. Searcy 




RIDDLEBERGER, Capta 




BURGESS, Firs* Lieutenant 



"Certify I think that 'B' Company is the best drilled com|iany in the world, and if you don't 
believe me just ask JVIajor Ellis" — any "B" Company man will tell you the same thing, and the 
strange part of the entire matter is that they're just about correct. The way the "pebble-pushers" 
can caper about the hill is nothing short of miraculous, and as a result every competitive drill finds 
them at the top. This accomplishment is all the more astonishing in view of the fact that "B" 
Company is the only infantry compan\' in the Corps, and thus has to adapt itself to pigmies and 
colossi alike. Despite this "sizable" (iiflicult\, "B" Company is one of the most outstanding 
companies on the hill (even though we all consider ourselves pretty darn good), one respectable 
evidence being that they now repose in second place in the Garnett-Andrews competition. When 
Gabriel blows first call for drill on his heavenly horn, "B" Company will be there to show the 
boys how it really should be done (attendance at this function will be optional). 



■ I r 1 J 

11 II i 







Hill 13 fl 11 




-IRST Class 

F. W. T. C. Ada 
R. C. Blackmon 

G. C. Budd 

B. S. Holland 
H. A. Jacob 
W. I. Jeffries 
J. S. Littrell 
R. R. Messick 
R. W. Nix 



PRIVATES 



H. L. Wchrle 
J. M. Witt 
Second Class 
C. Lau 
H. L. Rucker 



R. C. Marshall 
R. S. Meisel 



W. K. Goolrick 



1. G. Robinson 
A. J. Rooklin 
I. B. Rudulph 
j. M. TaUafer: 
G. P. Welch 



E. M. Barber 
R. T, Bland 
R. ^X'. Coe 

A. H. Co>.-art 
I. V. Embrev 
\\-. L. Evans. 
T. H. Grant 
R. K. Grav 
H. L. Harris 



L. A. Heindl 
D. M. Ho«ert 
I. A. Huihes 
C. G. Knick 
R. T. Lemtno: 
R. A. Leo-is 
^X". D. Ulbrd 
C. E. Lvman 
J. A. McDono; 



W. E. NichoLs 



D. RLsacn 
S. Seiroi: 

L. Shc=:o 
H. Swecke 

\r. D. Ti 




THE B 



B Of NINETEEN T H I 1! T Y - N I N E 



COMPANY ■■C," CAVALRY 




THE STAFF 

T. A. E. ^loSELEV, Jr Captain 

W. H. Cox Fust Lieutenant 

F. G. Jarmax, Jr Second Lieutenant 

M. D. Barefield Second Lieutenant 

O. H. West Second Lieutenant 

J. E. Harter First Sergeant 

D. L. May Supply Sergeant 



SERGEANTS 

F. H. Barksdale p. B. Coldiron 

R. L. Morrison' E. W. Mitchell 

T. R. Opie E. V. Weir 

S. A. V'lxcEXT W. H. Harvey 

F. C. IVIcCall 



D. W. GOTT 

D. E. Clark 
P. H. Killey 
L. N. Browx 
J. G. Wood 

A. S. MODISETT 



CORPORALS 

G. A. Sancken 
H. H. C. Richards 
C. M. Bache 
F. C. Horton 
C. Satterfield 

E. P. LiTTLEJOHX 

W. B. Wilson 



* 




MOSELEY, Captain 




COX, First Lieutenant 



It's a hard thing to keep a good man down, and the old adage certainly applies to Tom Moseley 
and his "C" Company lads. In spite of their diminutive size and light (with exceptions) weight 
they always seem to bob up where least expected and are a continual thorn in the sides of the 
other companies in intramural competition and out on the hill. What they lack in stature they 
certainly make up in spirit and in will to win in spite of overwhelming odds. Morale is a tre- 
mendous factor in a company's success and "C" Company undoubtedly has it ne plus ultra. At 
the beginning of the year the little cavalrymen were far down on the list in the all-important 
Garnett-Andrews race, but in retort to the slighting remarks of "sinks" sages they are now mak- 
ing a determined bid for first place and are really getting results, much to the annoyance of the 
seeded first-placers. Tom, Wussy, Bare, Oscar, and Flash have done a grand job, and we salute 
them. 




First Class 


C. Nelson 




J. W. Burchiicld 










J. S. Thompson 


T. Y. Da™ 


F. W. Poos 


G. S. Andrew 


J. B. Newman 




G. B. English 






PRIVATP<^ 


R. T. '« ncht 


I. B. DiUard 


L. G. Porter 


N. Bolotin 


A. H. Robertson 




F. \V. Hoover 










Fourth Class 


H. B. Garrett 


C. H. Pnrdum 


C. P. Brownley 


D. K. Santec 




N. H. Ho;cn,;iss 


L. 


N 


Waters 


G S Home 


D. T. .Aston 


P. X. Gear^-. Tr. 


D. L. Ri»-ls 


W. A. Cracraft 


D. J. Stroop 




J. G. McCann 


R 


J. 


Weiss 




C. T. Bounds 


T. A. Hacan 


R. C- Reed 


J. M. Dunlap 


J. E. Talman 




T. Moncurc 


THIf 


D Class 




B. Burnett 


E. L. Kerpel 


H. S. Stra-^lsssr 


C. V. Fraser 


P, F. Tinslev 




B. W. Mundy 


I. 


1 






D. D. Cameton 


1. D. Lm ' 


H. C. Siitfaerktii 


J. S. Higgins 


W. B. Verell 




E. O'Conner 


L. 


B 


Cann 


H D Oliver 


J. ^'. Carmine 


T. E. Lovd 


H. M. Tcoznt^ 


O. H. HiH 


G. M. Whit2 




F. T. Schneider 


S 


W' 


Dobyns 


O. H. Persons 


C. N. Catlett 


A. D. Utm 


A. D. Tudt 


H. J. Kandcl 


Second Class 




F. H. Stevens 


L. 


n 






A. H. Clatk 


A. R. Milio 


C. T. Urmiair 


E. J. Kaufman 


D. M. Badg!-v 




1. S. Taylor 










C. L. Crane 


G. L. Ne»i^<3!d 




V. P. Kovar 


R. H. Barnes 




O. M. Walcott 










R. B. Croplev 


1. O'KeeSe 


A. H. Willia=a 


A. C. Lord 


B. S. Branson 










h 


i 

% 1 




1. M. Patter; 


T. W. W~:!l:i=sc= 




1 


8 


3 9 








9 3 


Q 
















'^'\ \ ~ 


1 ' 








yj'^t 


\j' 









THE BOMB OF 



I N [ T E E N T H I I! T y - N 1 N E 



COMPANY "D," ARTILLERY 



THE STAFF 
P. R. BaLDW.N Captain 

B. H. Barnes First Lieutenant 

C. C. Crump Second Lieutenant 

E. T- TiCE Second Lieutenant 

H. O. GoLLADAV Second Lieutenant 

P. G. Chapman First Sergeant 

L. D. AIatter Supply Sergeant 



GOLLADAY 

CRUMP 

TICE 

econd Lieutenan 




SERGEANTS 

R. G. Bailey J. S. :\IcCrackex 

E. H. Haaoier J. R. Carter 

J. E. Pitman B. F. Kump 

A. V. Carr W. B. Garland 

E. L Brown 



CORPORALS 



R. J. Tho:\ipson 
J. K. Rose 
R. C. Maling 
L. D. Hill 
R. W. Replogle 
C. L. ]\Ioblev 



P. A. Braver 
A. J. Ellender 
R. W. Jeffrey 
H. J. Dance 

J. A. SOSBEE 

H. E. Trask 




BALDWIN, Capta 




BARNES, First Lieutenant 



"D" Company is another organization of "little" boys, but their smallness does not extend beyond 
th:ir stature. There is not a finer aggregate of men to be found anywhere in V. AI. L One 
and all they are grand friends, they know what is expected of them, they accomplish their object- 
ive, and thjy are proud of their company with good reason. The little artillerymen have not been 
outstanding either in intramurals or on the drill field this year, but in spite of their size handicap 
they enter into all acti\ities with the same indomitable spirit that has carried them to so many 
triumphs in the pa;:t. Suffice it that when any company comes from an encounter with "D" 
Company they know that they have been through a real struggle. However, when it's a show that 
you want, kindh' page the "fourth ranking" compan)-. They're the lads to make the crowd gasp 
at garrison review and to cause the officers to smile with satisfaction on R. S. O. P. Battery. 




r Class 
H. Becker 
R. Bickforc 
S. Cooper 
p. UlggCS 
E. Feddem 
P. Fosque 



J. L. Meem 
L. H. Meem 
W. W. Middlet 
E. Rubira 
R. J. Tucker 
G. W. VanHoo! 
W. F. Wolcott 
T. L. Wright 
G. Yee 

Second Class 

J. H. Baker 
C. Beach 



Y. Boatner 
W. H. U. Darden 
W. S. Griffith 
C. M. Hoge 
U. E. Phillippi 
R. B. Ritchie 
J. A. Smith 
A. L. Wadsworth 
E. E. Wilson 
'hird Class 
C. E. Butler 
H. P. Clark 



PRIVATES 



B. M. DirZL 
D. C. Fram 
T. H. Harrc 
F. B. Hill 

C. A. Huds< 



L. M. Nance 




L. B. Rashkin 
,1. R. Swetting 
'ovRTH Class 
R. Baldwin 
]. R. Banks 



E. S. Grancer 
A. M. Grindle 
1. C. Hcokn 
R. E. Teschke 
C. D. Kelso 
E. V. King 
H . B . KinsoU"in£: 
C. R. Urn 
L. L. Le4ch 
1. 'S". Martin 
j. K. McCnllougr 
G- W. Moore 



B. M. More* 
1. Mullen 
J. Pake 
S. M. PaAam 
L. T. Paifcer 
C. E. Pickett 

E.W. Siiin 
N. R. T:^in 
E. H. Wahl-rt 
R. D. ■Wall 
A. G. ■Willi==is 
W. M. Zseeker 



THE BOMB Of NINETEEN T H I I! T Y - N I N E 



COMPANY "E," ARTILLERY 



THE STAFF 

L. Booker Captntn 

L. G. Mathews First Lieutenant 

J. H. Bailey Second Lieutenant 

W. F. Brand Second Lieutenant 

R. C. BrittinghaiM Second Lieutenant 

T. E. SXVDER First Sergeant 

F. R. TORRIXGTON Supply Sergeant 



BRAND 

BAILEY 

BRITTINGHAM 

Second Lieutenants 




SERGEANTS 

V. J. Tho:\ipsox D. P. Smith 

J. D. Harris A. R. Flinn 

A. G. Fallat R. a. Merchant 

J. L. Hart M. R. Morrissett 

R. P. Smith 



CORPORALS 



R. A. Foster 

F. C. GOOLSRY 
J. W. BOWAIAN 
D. A. BUONANNO 

J. R. Dale 

C. H. GOMPF 



K. Willis 
A. T. Weiss 
J. W. Ayler 
E. M. Meyer 
W. E. Richardson 
E. W^. Galloway 




BOOKER, Capta 




MATHEWS, First Lieutenant 



Yei, it's that notorious "route-step company" again! But what a difference in "E" Company 
this year! Still the old joviality, still the old devil-may-care spirit, but this time an organization 
with a wealth of talent and a firm determination to really go places. Inspired by a fine group of 
officers and under the spirited leadership of Bill Bond and Lewis Booker, "E" Company for the 
first time in years has been an outstanding contender in competitive drills, and its work on the 
guard teams has been unsurpassed. In the Garnett-Andrews competition, the "5th ranking com- 
pany" has always remained a serious threat to the leaders, pushing close on their heels with victo- 
ries in foul goals, handball, and swimming. In parades, too, "E" Company has been especially 
outstanding, belying the old myth of the squads "in echelon." These artillerymen have been most 
lucky this year in that they have received a fine group of "rats" to carry on the fine standards set 
up during the current session, and the future can only be bright with such men as Tom Snyder 
and Fran Torrington at the helm for next year. 




D. W. Carr 



C. A. Harkrade. 
F. A, Hippey 
J. J. Johnson 
J. P. Johnson 



J. A, Love 
E. C. Maxwell 
W. G. Quinn 
R. Ragland 
E. H. Ruffin 
D. B. Slcssman 
W. E. Wilkms 



J. G. Hundley 
F. D. Marshall 
R. W. Moncure 
R. G. Pollard 



I. T. VanPatten 



I. Charles 
C. Hamptt 



PRIVATES 



F. G. Louthan 



G. W. Shelho 
R. L. Spear 



A. R. Spencer 
W. A. \N-ilhs 

OU RTH Cl.-\SS 
F. D. Barclay 
J. E. Cheatham 
E. N. Chiles 

C. C. Qay 

D. S. Connor 

B. L. Ciafton 
L. A. Djrham 
\\". S. Edwards 
\N'. F. Hood 



. GTUram 



I. T. Matthew's 
R. E. L. Michie 
1. M. MilU 



I. A. Perkim 
■«-. H- Pile 
^^. I. Powers 
A. C- Pnrciiir 
A. G. S~eri 
C. R. Tosa 
•^- B- ^Tilker 
R. A. ^Teller 
T, T. \riL«o= 

XT- E. ■vrc«;r» 



8 3 



if 



, .1 

\3' 



THE BOMB Of NINETEEN T N I D T Y ■ N I H E 



COMPANY "F." ARTILLERY 



THE STAFF 

R. D. Strickler Captain 

T. W. Gray First Lieutenant 

A. W. Ellis Second Lieutenant 

W. W. CoLE^LAN Second Lieutenant 

J. S. Hughes Second Lieutenant 

W. A. Edens First Sergeant 

D. C. DoMIxiCK. Supply Sergeant 



ELLIS 

COLEMAN 
HUGHES 

Kond Lieutenants 





SERGEANTS 
P. B. May A. L. Tlrxer 

R. H. Deaderick. J. F. Larrick 

W. F. Mandt a. K. Keesee 

S. G. Gary F. C. Miner 

R. S. Aaron 

CORPORALS 

E. A. Stumi'f H. J. Fores.man 

S. H. Swift A. L. Nelson 

C. L. RocKwooD M. D. Lucas 

J. L. ParRISH R. J. DOLAND 

H. R. Gantt J. F. Hirst 

H. E. Mecredy p. a. Hughes 

E. O. Smith 




STRICKLER, Capta 




GRAY, First Lieute 



For years barracks has been trying to explode the theory that quality goes with size — in vain. The 
big artillerymen are supposed to be good — they are. Under the leadership of Captain Strickler 
they have amassed a record score in intramurals to win the trophy by a most respectable margin, 
and are in the thick of the fight for the Garnett-Andrews Cup. It is indeed a great credit to Dick, 
Woody, A. W., Dogs, and Jimmy, that they have led "F" Company to such an outstanding tri- 
umph. And certainly theirs is a remarkable achievement, ranking, as they do, so high in all fields 
of company endeavor: first lines, competitive drills, guard tours, and intramurals. But life is 
not too serious in "F" Company even with the high code of discipline exacted by Walter Edens. 
The first class privates especially get more than an even break, and it is through their apprecia- 
tion of the treatment accorded them and their fine spirit of cooperation that the company has 
been able to make such progress. Incidentally, if you care to see a truly fine battery watch "F" 
Company "Keep 'em rolling." 




■ "^cw-j. ~-»»- -. 



First Class 


I. V. Parham 


Second Class 




t - 




I. D. Brayshaw 


J. K. Peebles 


G. V. Atkison 




PRIVATES 


L. D. Brayton 


W. S. Riddick 


D. D. Bigbec 








B. P. Carter 


W. A. Samans 


J. M. Cheek 


\\ 


. A. Walton 


A. E. Donn 


H. ]. Cronin 


I. N. Saxe 


P. E. Cline 


R 


V. Wasdell 


W. A. Garr 


]. P. Dorricr 


]. E. Seaton 


F. C. Culpepper 


C 


S. Weaver 




F. B. Emerson 


W. R. Smithcy 


W. C. Glover 


R 


H White 


W. M. lack 


]. K. Halev 


T. W. Spurgin 


H. T. Graher 


Th.b 


D Class 


E. G. Kinc 


W. R. Hoblitzell 


J. M. Tabb 


G. B. Handy 


E. 




A. H. McK 


L. E. Hudgim 


H. L. Thornton 


B. Harvev 


1. 


H. CondufI 


E, F. Newtc 


W. K. Johnson 


A. J. Trzeciak 


G. C. Irwin 








O. B. Knight 


A. M. Turner* 


D. G. McM.Uin 




I 


i 


Y. H. Knowles 


J. C. Wood 


H. F. Sharp 






Richtnond 


\X-. E. Dcolar. 


C. B. MiUer 


Reutt 


1. L. Domer 


C- S. Muile= 




C. M. Drake 


W. B. Nti^mz 


. Tipton 


I. E. Edens 


D. R. Oakev 


Traver 


M. E. Fulk 


C. W. Page 


Cl^\ss 


A. P. Gcddin 


I. B. Pierce 


Beckham 


I. C. Halv 


J. H. RsndolK! 


sbv 


G. W. Heath 


G Rhea 


. Bro^vn 


S. T. Hcdadav 


P. R ."Sifsn'r 


Bi-rd 


E. H. lones 


A. Vict 


Coburn 


T. R. Jones 


R. H. WiUis=s 


Davis 


C. L. Lea-is 


R. P. \niuj=s 


Deahl 


I. R. NJaJor 


T. I. ■WiUcn 
I. M. \rridir 




OFFICERS OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY 

ATTACHED 

Major Withers A. Burress, U. S. Infantry Commandant of Cadets 



Major John M. Fray U.S. Field Artillery 

Major William A. Ellis U.S. Infantry 

Major Gordon" G. Heiner U.S. Field Artillery 



Captain" Alexander T. McCone . . . . V. S. Field Artillery 

Captain Basil G. Thaver U.S. Cavalry 

Captain Powhatan M. Morton U.S. Cavalry 




TACTICAL OFFICERS 



Major Withers A. Burress 
Major Richard C. Weaver 



. Commandant 
Executive Officer 



Major John S. Jamison, Jr. 
Major Robert H. Knox 
Major Ludwell L. Montague 
Major Walter L. Lowry 
Captain Arthur McL. Lipscomb 



Captain James M. Wiley 
Captain Fred C. Vose 
Captain Walter S. Grant 
Captain Irving G. Foster 

[178] 



Captain Richard C. Horne 
Captain John B. Cabell 
Captain Frank H. Travis 
Captain Fred L. Kelly 
Captain Herbert N. Dillard 




A T N L E T I ( S 





MAJOR-GENERAL WILLIAM H. COCKE 

1924-1929 



Born City Point, Virginia, September 12, 1874; received 
primary education there; at age of fourteen he went to a 
high school in Staunton; entered V. M. I. in August, 
1890, graduating as first stand man and Jackson Hope 
medahst in the class of 1894; commandant, Kemper 
Military Academy, Bocneville, Missouri, for three years; 
studied law at Washington University, Saint Louis, for 
one year; studies interrupted by Spanish-American War, 
during which he held commission as First Lieutenant, 
Fourth Missouri Volunteers; practiced law in Saint Louis 
after the war; became President and General Manager of 
the Saint Louis (Michigan) Chemical Company, later 
organizing the Commercial Acid Company, known after 
1918 as the Southern Acid and Sulphur Company; at- 
tained noteworthy success as president and general man- 
ager of this firm. Major in the Missorri National 
Guard, Thirty-fifth Division, during the World War; 
sent overseas in 1918, resuming his business in Saint 
Louis upon discharge at termination of war. Superin- 
tendent of V. M. L, 1924-1929. 



WASHINGTON STATUE, 1914 



THE FRENCH CANNON 




ATNLETK 
ADMIHISTHIIOH 



ALUMNI 

Mr. J. C. Miller, Jr. 

Mr. W. B. Bowles Mr. J. C. Hagan, Jr, 





COUNCIL 






COL W. C. COUPER 






Senior Faculty Member 






R. D. STRICKLER 




F 


resident Athletic Association 






• 






MEMBERS 






FACULTY 




Col. Swan 


Col. Bovkin 


Maj. Clarksos" 


Col. Millner 


Col. Purdv 

CADETS 


Maj. Jamison' 


E. J. TiCE 
Tr. 


W. H. Co.\ 
G. S. Andrew 


P. G. Chapman 



\s\,^HE Athletic Council is the governing body for all intercollegiate 
^/ sports. It determines matters of policy, selects coaches and cadet 
managers, awards monograms and numerals and appoints the editor- 
in-chief of the V. M. I. Cadet. 

On the council are three alumni, seven members of the facultv 
board, the director of athletics, the president and vice-president of the 
Athletic Association, two cadets, chosen from X'arsitv captains and 
managers, and the editor of The Cadet. 



N U A M ( L U B 



Officers 

R. D. Strickler President 

P. C. Shu Vice-President 

T. W. Gray Secretary 



THE HEALTH FVL AND PUASANT ABODE OF A CROWD OF HONORABLE 
YOVTHS PRESSING VP THE HIU OF SCIENCE \V1TH NOBLE EMVLATION 
A GRATIFYING SPECTACLE AN HONOR. TO OVR.- COVNTR.Y ANDOVB. 
STATE OBJECTS OF HONESTPRJDE TO THEJR.INSTR.VCTOR^ AND FAIR. 
SPECIMENS OF CITIZEN SOLDIERi : ATTACHED TO THEIR, NATIVE STATE 
PR.OVDOF HER. FAME AND READY IN EVERY TIME OF DEEPEST PER.IL 




Atkison', G. \'. 
Branamav, J. A. 
Brittincham, R. C. 
Brown", L. N. 
Chapman, P. G. 
colemak, w. w. 
Deaderick, R. H. 
dominick, d. c. 
Echols, W. M. 
Edwards, R. A. 
Ellis, A. W. 
Faulkner, C. J. 
Ferrey, R. H. 
Foster, R. A. 
Gray, T. W. 
Haislip, W. M. 
Hardaway, B. H. 
Heely, D. H. 
Hill, O. H. 
hoblitzell, \v. r. 
Holland, B. S. 



HUYETT, L. R. 
IRBY, R. L. 

Irving, R. A. 
Irwin, G. C. 
Jones, L. F. 
Kandel, H. J. 
KOVAR, V. P. 
Larrick, J. F. 
Lau, C. 

LlTTLEJOHN, E. P. 
LiTTRELL, J. S. 

Matter, L. D. 
Meem, L. H. 
Mitchell, E. M. 
Moses, E. C. 
Nelson, A. L. 
Opie, T. R. 
Pollard, R. G. 
Replocle, R. W. 
Reuit, R. F. 
RUBIRA, E. 



Saunders, O. B. 
Saxe, I. N. 
Sexton, C. S. 
Shelby, J. L. 
Shu, P. C. 
Simpson, G. H. 
Stencele, H. E. 
Strickler, R. D. 
Stumpf, E. a. 
Swift, S. H. 
Talman, J. E. 
Taylor, E. R. 
Thrasher, T. L. 
Tipton, H. G. 
Trzeciak, a. J. 
Vanhoose, G. W. 
Verell, W. B. 
Walker, B. W. 
Wasdell, R. V. 
White, R. H. 
Witt, J. M. 



THE 

ATNLETK 

ASSOCIATION 



R. D. STRICKLER 
President 



P. C. SHU 

Vice-President 




'-^HE purpose of the V. M. I. Athletic Association is to foster the general 
^ welfare of all athletic activities in which the Virginia Military Institute 
is engaged. The association is governed by the Athletic Council, and both 
in turn are subject to the supervision and approval of the Superintendent. 
Those eligible for membership in the association include members of the Corps 
of Cadets, alumni, Board of Visitors and employees of the Institute. These 
are each represented by their respective members on the Athletic Council. 

The association has a president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, and a 
publicity director. Chosen by and from the Corps for this year are Cadets 
R. D. Strickler, president, and P. C. Shu, vice-president. Col. Read is the 
publicity director. 

V. M. I. is a member of the Southern Conference, and is thereby subject 
to all of the rules and regulations of this conference. 




ALLISON T. (POOLEY) HUBERT 

Head Coach 



THE 
fOOTBALL (OACNES 



Too often spectators are prone to give credit only to actual per- 
formance on the athletic field, forgetting the weeks of steady 
practice under competent coaching. To these coaches whose efforts 
have made V. M. I. football teams as much as have the efforts of 
the players we make grateful recognition. 




MAJOR BLANDY B. CLARKSON 
Director of Athletics 




LASLIE 
Line Coach 

WALKER 
End Coach 

HUBERT 
Head Coach 

COHEN 
ckfield Coach and Scout 



L 




f T B A L L 



ANDY TRZECIAK 

Captain 



Firit Ron: Saunders. Kovar. Irbv. Taylor. Trzeciak (Cjp(aml. Gray. Stnckler. EchoLs. Walke 

•cond Ron: Mcem. Replogle. Tipton. Navas. Marshall. Irivin. Feddeman. Holland, Nelson. 

Third Row: Messick. Reutt, Magoffin. Simpson. Carney, Huyett, Atkison, Thrasher, Se-vton, 

FottTlh Row: Swelling, Shelby, Chapman, Mirchell, Shu, Heely, Johnson, Aylcr, Par: 

Fiflh Ron-: Patchin. Walter, Laslic, Hubert, Cohen, Ticc ( ,\/jn,igf r ) 



Brittingha 




iiffc^ia 



ii^;fsAfi^*s|!-j^!V'1 



%^fe;fiM|^y^i| 






f OOTBALL 
SEASOH 



THE SEASON 

V.M.I. 33; Elcn 7 

V.M.I 12; Virginia 12 

V.M.I 0; Navy 26 

V. M. 1 7; Clemson 7 

V.M.I 13; Richmond 6 

V. M. 1 14; William and Mary 

V. M. 1 47; Maryland 14 

V. M. 1 6; Wake Forest 6 

V. M. 1 19; Davidson 6 

V. M. 1 6; Roanoke 

V.M.I 2; V. P. 1 2 

STARTING LINEUP 




HERB PATCHIN 



Tavlor Right End 

Strickler Right Tackle 

Gr.^v Right Guard 

Irbv Ccnter 

ECHOLS Lcjt Guard 

Trzeciak 



Walker . . 
Brittin'cham 
Shelbv . . 

KOVAR . . 

Shu . . . 



. Left Tackle 

. . Left End 

Quarterback 

Left Halfback 

Right Halfback 






SVW,»A^' 






^^^^ 



V. M. I., 33; Elon, 7 

'/Ik- 'liKhtiMK .S<i,ia<lroii' o|K-n.-<J the 'jfi toorball scawjn with an all-round 
<li^|.lay ol povv.T by ,l,-fc-ati,.« Klon's "J-ightinj; Christians." Jn avenging an 
oiK-n.nu |lay .Icfcat at the ha„<ls of Klo„ in '37, V. M. I. gave promise' of'the 
power which earned it to secoiul place in the Southern Conference. 

Hehiiu] perfect blocking by Strickler aruJ Kchols, ".Son" Shelby, sr.phomore 
star, i.i.kcl <ip ,i-hr yards through right guard to mark his first attempt in 
vais,r.\ conipenrion. Shelby stole the show from the great Paul .Shu by directly 
accoiinrui;.' for one score, and setting up two more. In the first quarter he 
hurled a tliii ty-yanl pass to Dale Hcely, who raced the remaining few yards to 
score untouched. In the third quarter he broke away on the Elon 41 for about 
SIX yards, then just before being tackled, iateraled to Trzeciak, who romped the 
remaining ,^5. In the fourth perio.l, Neil Hrown, another promising sophomore 
back, carne,] the hall to the Kh,n 4 on three beautiful line plunges, and Shelby 
scored from there. 

V. M. 1., 12; Virginia, 12 

Playing before a crowd of some \2,(XXJ fans under unusuallv warm weather 
conditions, V. M. 1. retained its distinction of never having lost'to the Cavaliers 
in the latter's Scott Stadium. 

Bud Kovar put V. M. I. in front midway in the first period when he raced 
29 yards to score on a perfectly executed spinner play. Gillette of Virginia 
went over on a double reverse a little later to tie the score. 

V. M. I. dominated the play in the second quarter, but could ge: no further 
than the Wahoo ten-yard line. 

The Keydets continued their attack in the third canto and after Shelby re- 
turned a punt to Virginia's 47, marched to a score in nine plays. Heely took a 
pass from Shelby for the touchdown. Shu lead a Keydet attack in the final pe- 
riod and crossed the Cavalier goal line only to have a penalty nullify the score. 

A passing attack that carried over half the length of the field in five plays 
set the stage for the second Virginia score late in the fourth quarter. 

V. M. I., 0; Navy, 26 

The Squadron suffered its first and only loss at the hands of a hard and fast 
playing Navy team. "Bud" Kovar's 35-yard return of the opening kick-ofi. and 



ihis phoro couilety of Richmond Times Dispatch 





his powerful line plunges during the second quarter were offset by the brilliant 
pass-receiving of Powell, Navy captain, and the running attack of Navy's Wood, 
Lenz, and Cook. "Andy" Trzeciak turned in his usual excellent kicking per- 
formance, and one of Shu's was good for 75 yards. "Mike" Irby was the rea- 
son why Navy didn't score more often from the air, the V. M. I. center batting 
down many of Navy's passes. "Andy" Trzeciak and "Snag" Meem bore the 
brunt of Navy's offensive, and in backing up the line, made some verv hard 

tackles which smeared numerous plays. 

Although the Squadron was clearly outplayed, it lost none of its fight, and 
came back with the spirit which carried it to one of its most successful seasons. 





5/^ 




V. M. I., 7; Clemson, 7 

With the corps of cadets in the stands at Charlotte yelling and cheering as 
never before, an inspired "Fighting Squadron" came back in the last three min- 
utes to tie the highly fa\ored Clemson Tigers. 

V. ]VI. I. held a slight edge in the first half as they stopped the Clemson 
drives time and again before they were under way. The outstanding line play 
of Strickler, Gray, Echols, and Walker was a big factor in the team's fine show- 
ing. The Keydets gained 162 yards from scrimmage in contrast to Clemson's 
54 \ards. Shu, Shelby, and Kovar were responsible for a Keydet drive early in 
the fourth period. Bryant, Clemson back, returned one of Shu's long punts 88 
\ards for a touchdown towards the end of the period, and it looked bad for Coach 
Hubert's charges. 

Captain Trzeciak and his mates came back, however, with an amazing and 
fighting drive that carried the ball over the goal line. Shu scored on a pass from 
Shelby. Trzeciak's quick thinking and Shu's tremendous drive counted the ex- 
tra point to tie the score. 

V. M. I., 13; Richmond, 6 

The Fighting Squadron made short work of Richmond's unbeaten Spiders 
with Paul Shu leading the way by scoring on a double reverse sweep around left 
end, which was good for 44 yards. Gray set up the second touchdown by re- 
covering a Richmond fumble on their 10. After a fruitless attempt through the 
line, Shu threw a pass to Trzeciak, who was waiting in the end zone. In the 
third period, Richmond's sophomore star, Art Jones, returned Trzeciak's kick 





^^zas^^ 










92 yards for Richmond's only score. Except for this, V. M. I. had almost com- 
plete control; one touchdown was called back, and after a 6oyard drive to 
within six inches of a score the final whistle prevented another. Red Echols was 
outstanding in the line and Spider backfield all afternoon, and Strickler and 
Walker also played a great defensive game. Gray's effective blocking paved the 
way for many of Shu's first downs, and Brittingham's work against the opposi- 
tion's tackles was a source of satisfaction to Coach Laslie. 

V. M. I., 14; William and Mary, 

Coach "Pooh" Hubert's Big Red Team continued to set the pace in the 
state football wars by beating the Indians in their homecoming game at Wil- 
liamsburg. 

The second stringers played o\er half the contest, which saw V. M. I. bottle 
up the William and Mary attack \ery effectively. The Keydets marched to a 
touchdown early in the second quarter with Paul Shu and Phil Chapman supply- 
ing the drive. 

The excellent play of Brittingham, Echols. Strxkler. Tipton, and Reutt is 
deserving of particular mention. 

The Squadron counted again in the third period when Ray Reutt intercepted 
Twiddy's pass and raced 74 yards to cross the Indian goal line. 

Paul Shu played his usual brilliant game, as did Trzeciak and Kovar. The 
fine showing of the second stringers was especially gratifying. 

Gus Twiddy's great punting was a standout for William and Marv. 

V. M. I., 47; Maryland, 14 

The Squadron didn't waste any time in getting started to avenge the defeat 
handed them by Maryland which spoiled last year's homecoming game. Al- 
though Mar\land was crippled by loss of such stars as ^leade and ^londorff. 
V. M. I. played a game which clicked so well it would have been difficult to 
stop. Shu proved that he was well able to be called an All- American candidate 
by scoring 23 points on placement kicks, reception of passes, and a great running 
attack. His punts were also exceptional, one going out on the !Marvland 3. 
Many of Shu's runs can be credited to Kovar, who has turned into one of the 
best blocking backs \'. M. I. has ever had. After the first string had run up a 
score of 21 to O, the reser\ es went in and the score still continued upward. Frank 




Carney showed plenty of ability and drive, 
and Shelby to Shu was the password. 



Shelby's passes were very effective, 







V. M. I., 6; Wake Forest, 6 

In a homecoming game that was as muddy as any on record, the "Fighting 
Squadron" was held to a six-six deadlock by the strong Wake Forest Deacons. 

The first half was all V. M. 1., as Shu and Kovar made repeated gains on 
the quagmired gridiron. Shu's 48-yard run to the Deacon ten-yard stripe early 
in the game was the longest of the afternoon. After losing the ball on downs, 
the Keydets came back to score near the end of the first quarter, as Shu went 
over from the three-yard line. 

The third period was taken up by frequent punt exchanges, with each team 
being guilty of several fumbles. 

The Deacon's attack could not be denied in the last period, as Mayberry, 
Gallovich, and Edwards led a touchdown drive to tie the score. 

Brittingham and Taylor were outstanding on defense for V. M. I., and 
Captain Andy Trzeciak was brilliant in backing up the line and directing the 
offense. 

V. M. I., 19; Davidson, 6 

Swivel-hipped Paul Shu sparked the win over Davidson by scoring three 
touchdowns. V. M. I. just barely missed scoring two more when Reutt inter- 
cepted a pass on the Wildcat 30 and ran it back to the 5 before being rushed 
out of bounds as the half ended. The other near tally came in the last quarter 
when Trzeciak threw a long spiral pass to Taylor as he sprinted into the end 
zone, but Taylor was ruled to have caught the pass out of the end zone. 

Irby stopped a Davidson threat in the third period when he intercepted a pass 
on his own 21. Shu and Kovar did most of the ground gaining, while Trzeciak 
converted one extra point, Irby, Taylor, Brittingham, and Walker paced the 
line play. 

One of Shu's runs was a 63-yard punt return in the last three minutes of 
play; he raced over the goal line imtouched. 

Davidson's only score came on a long pass on the eighth play of the second 
period after a first period spent in punt exchanges in which Davidson had a 
decided edge. 








"ll-^ "y 





r- 
.':>^ 



rr^ 







V. M. I., 6; Roanoke, 

The Big Red Team continued its winning ways against the determined 
Roanoke Maroons as Andy Trzecialc lead a third period drive to score the only 
touchdown of the game. Rain and a sloppy field again slowed up the Keydet 
offense. 

Shu's kicking kept Roanoke backed up in its own territory for most of the 
first half. Brittingham and Strickler were quite effective in holding the Salem 
team in check. An offside penalty robbed V. M. I. of a safety in the second 
period shortly after Shu punted Roanoke into a hole. 

Captain Trzeciak scored for V. ]\I. I. early in the third period, as he carried 
the ball the las:: 22 yards in six tries. Shelby, Chapman, and Brown were also 
outstanding in the Keydet backfield. 

Roanoke's only threat came in the final quarter when the Maroon ofiense 
advanced to V. ]\I. I.'s ig-yard line. 

V. M. I., 2; V. P. I., 2 

In the worst weather possible for the last and most important game, \ . P. I. 
made the most of its opportunities and tied a stronger Fighting Squadron, which 
piled up statistics in its favor but couldn't overcome fate. V. M. I.'s 150 yards 
gained rushing to V. P. I.'s 22 showed this superior power, hut six inches of 
slippery snow and mud slowed the Keydets down just enough to prevent a 
touchdown. 

Thi- whole team pla\ed one of the best games it played all year. Sexron 
saved the day after Shu kicked out on the Tech 12 by tackling V. P. I.'s 
Hudson behind his own goal for a safety. Son Shelby was at a disadvantage 
with his passing, but handled the safety position in grand style. Bud Kovar was 
the chief ground gainer and sparked most of the first down drives, aided by Shu. 
Trzeciak made the longest run around his own left end which was good for 
thirty-three yards. Irby handled the ball perfectly and deserves much credit. 
Taylor and Strickler accounted for numerous Gobbler losses. Walker and Nelson 
got down under ptmts to throw recei\ers before they even got starred, and Gray 
and Echols opened the holes which made possible the consistent line gaining. 
Thus the Fighting Squadron displayed its mighty power, and though ending the 
game with a tie, satisfied its supporters by taking Tech apart. 



HUY^n 




Brittingha 



Taylo 



Gray, Echols. Sti 



At the clo^e of their last college football season, 
these nine men received miniature footballs for their 
outstanding service to V. M. I. athletics. They have 
been outstanding not only in their athletic pro\vess, 
but in their loyalty, both on the field and off. All 
true gentlemen, they are certainly a credit to the In- 



stitute which they represent. I hate to see them go, 
for it was a pleasure to work and associate with them. 
In time we shall replace them on the football field, 
but their friendship and loyalty will never be replaced. 
Best of luck, and I am sure that the success you 
have gained in college will be yours in later life. 

Co.ACH Allison T. (Pooley) Hubert. 




CHEER LEADERS 




BASK[TBALL 



RAY TAYLOR 
Capfain 




GUS EDWARDS 
Manager 



Sealed, left to r,ghl: Forcsman. Shu. Saxe. Taylor iCjptjm) . Saunders. Trzeciak. Parrish 
S:.:r,d:ns: Walker. Rashkin, Simpson. Shelby. Stumpf. Foster, Gott. Edwards ( A/jnjjer I 




f^jJ^. ^ 








COACH WALKER 



TNE BASKETBALL 
SEASOli 



RESULTS 



V. M. 1 28 

V.MA 28 

V. M. 1 48 

V.M.I 39 

V.M.I 23 

V.M.I 54 

V. M. 1 29 

V.M.I 41 

V. M. 1 54 

V. M. 1 43 

V.M.I 20 

V.M.I 29 

V. M. 1 35 

V. ^I. 1 27 

V.M.I 45 

V.M.I 37 

V. M. 1 20 

(Conferenc 



RESUME 



Roanoke 52 

U. N. C 35 

W. & M 43 

E. & H 37 

Virginia 3^ 

V. P. 1 36 

N. C. S 48 

U. X. C 43 

Furman ^^ 

V. P. 1 30 

Wake Forest 41 

Richmond 30 

Maryland 53 

Virginia 52 

W. c^- M 31 

Richmond 36 

Richmond 31 



At the beginning of practice Coach Walker was 
hampered by having practically his entire starting 
five composed of football men, and practice couldn't 



really start until after football season. Only one of 
last year's starting team was lost, and the return of 
"Doc" Saunders and the addition of Foster and 



,1 



»■/ 



i:!lL 



lib. 



/* 



Hi. 




Stumpf from tlic rats gave a much stronger team 
than V. M. I. had had for several years. 

The '39 edition of the Keydet basketeers dropped 
the opening game to Roanoke. Although show- 
ing flashes of form here and there, they were 
definitely no match for the smooth-running attack 
launched against them. 

Playing their first home game, V. M. I. made a 
strong comeback in the last half, but could not 
overtake an early lead by Carolina. The Keydets 
evened the count at won-one-lost-one by soundly 
defeating a highly favored William and Mary 
team. They were never headed once they got 
started, although the score was tied twice. A hard- 
fighting Emory and Henry team was next defeated 
by the Keydets, vvho were closely pushed all the 
way before finally emerging victorious by two 
points. Saunders and Saxe totaled seventeen points 
together. Close guarding kept the Wasps from 
scoring much from the floor, but they made good 
seventeen of twenty-one possible points from fouls. 

The Keydets put on a slow and disappointing 
game, featured by numerous fouls, to lose to Vir- 
ginia. The play of both teams was very rough, 
and V. M. I. was unable to score with any reg- 
ularity. 

V. P. I. was completely outclassed in the next 
game by V. M. I., and the lead was never threat- 
ened. The Keydets played one of their best games 
of the season. Shu scored at will to total twenty- 
two points, and Foster and Trzeciak gave almost 
perfect examples of guarding and floor work. 

Against N. C. State the play was very closely 
matched during the first half, but State turned on 
the pressure and pulled away in the last part of 
the game. 

The University of North Carolina barely nosed 
out V. M. I. the next night by two points. The 
lead changed hands many times and with five min- 
utes left Carolina was leading by ten points. V. 
M. I. quickly sank four field goals, but the final 
gun ended the rally. 

Furman got off to an early lead, which was 
soon overtaken as the varsity gained another win 
over a Southern Conference opponent to keep in 
the race for a bid to the tournament at Raleigh. 
Trzeciak was high scorer, and V. M. I. used every 
available substitute. 




TAYLOP. fOHwAHo 



SAUNDEftS cevren 



TRZECIAK GUAHo 




SIMPSON FOPWAROy ' ^^~' A 4 




SWELRY GUAM 



PAP. ft I SH ceNTER, 



V. p. I. was soundly defeated a second time by 
the Keydets, as they kept an eye on the Southern 
Conference bid. The first half was close, but V. 
M. I. couldn't be stopped in the second. 

Wake Forest's Deacons, Southern Conference 
leaders, got off to an early lead in defeating V. M. 
I., who just couldn't find the basket. The Cadets 
were caught on a decidedly off-night. 

Richmond took the last home game of the sea- 
son in a thriller which had the crowd on edge all 
night. It was the last game before the Corps for 
Captain "Ray" Taylor, "Doc" Saunders, "Andy" 
Trzeciak, and Saxe. The lead changed hands 
many times, Richmond finally ending up on top 
as Burge sank a free throw which kept them ahead 
for the remaining forty-five seconds. 

The Keydets were unable to keep up in the 
second half with Maryland's zone defense and fast- 
breaking offense, which never seemed to miss. 
Trzeciak was high scorer with seventeen points, 
and sophomores Foster and Stumpf displayed a 
hard-fighting brand of basketball. The game was 



much closer than indicated by the score, as Mary- 
land didn't pull away until the last. 

A crippled V. M. I. five minus the services of 
Trzeciak and Saunders were again defeated by 
Virginia. Foster was in the middle of every play 
and really gave Virginia plenty to worry about. 

Going down the home stretch, V. M. I. won its 
last two games over Southern Conference oppo- 
nents to get a bid to the tournament at Raleigh. 
William and Mary was defeated a second time in a 
rough contest which saw a revived V. M. I. team 
playing at its best. Fine offensive work by Saun- 
ders, Shu, and Foster and the defensive ability of 
the team as a whole insured victory. Against 
Richmond the team was still going strong and won 
the most closely contested game of the season as 
Foster sank a field goal in the last 15 seconds. 
Sophomore Eddie Stumpf showed up well. 

Coach Walker deserves much credit for his fine 
work in developing a well-coordinated, hard- 
fighting team which ranked among the top eight in 
the conference. 





HSTLI Hd 



JOHNNY TALMAN 
Captain 




CHARLEY NELSON 
Manager 



Steed, left lo nghl: Kandel, Littlejohn, VanHoosc, Matter. Talman iCjptJ.nV VCtt. Hill. Swift. \N-asdcll. Reutt 
Standmg: Barnes [Coach), Ellender, Swettmg. Jacobs. Jeffrey. Simpson. Sutherland. Beamer, Spear. Navas. Nelson ( .M„->r-gfr> 



'^WS':^ 




© 



---or ~^ 



^ 




tr 




COACH SAM BARNES 

RESU LTS 

V.M.I 9; Navy 17 

V.M.I 27; Duke 3 

V.M.I 27; V. P. 1 3 

V.M.I 22; N. C. State 6 

V.M.I 25; U. N. C 3 

V.M.I 8; Lehigh 26 

RESUME 

Coach Sam Barnes returned to V. M. I. for his sec- 
ond straight year as wrestling mentor and his 1939 
team went through another undefeated season in the 
Southern Conference, although losing matches to Navy 



TNE WnSTLIH(] 
SEASON 



and powerful Lehigh. This year no Southern Confer- 
ence tournament was held, but V. M. I. and W. and L., 
likewise unbeaten in the conference, were named co- 
champions. The season's record shows four victories 
against two defeats. 

The grapplers lost to Navy at Annapolis in their first 
match by a 17 to 9 score. Captain John Talman, Herb 
Kandel and sophomore Steve Swift were the winning 
Keydets. Jimmy Witt had the misfortune to slip into 
a pinning hold just as he was preparing to throw his 
Middie opponent. 

With only three first stringers wrestling, V. M. I. 




had no trouble in outscoring Duke 27 to 3. Van Hoose 
and Hill registered falls in the Durham meet. Jeffrey, 
Opie, Beamer, and Swift gained decisions while Reutt 
won by default. The following Tuesday in Blacksburg, 
the Keydet matmen rang up another conference victory 
by downing V. P. I., also by the score of 27 to 3. Kan- 
del, Matter, and Reutt chalked up falls, while Talman, 
Witt, Hill, and Wasdell took decisions. 

North Carolina State provided the opposition at V. 




M. I.'s first home match, but the visitors came out on 
the short end of a 22 to 6 count. Herb Kandel, true 
to form, bested th; State captain, while Tom Opie reg- 
istered a fall over the visitors welterweight ace. Hill, 
Witt, and Reutt won on decisions, and Van Hoose got 
credit for five points on a forfeit. 

Before a Midwinter Hop crowd, the varsity wrestlers 
romped all over North Carolina to take a 25 to 3 ver- 
dict in th:ir last conference match of the year. Kandel 
and Witt recorded falls. Littlejohn, Talman, Hill, 
Swift, and Reutt were the other winners. 

The final encounter of the season found Coach Barnes' 
charges pitted against Lehigh's Eastern Interco'legiate 
champs. The bouts were closer than the 26 to 8 score 
might indicate; that the Easterners presented a powerful 
and well balanced team cannot be denied. Kandel and 
Reutt won their bouts for V. M. I., each completing 
an undefeated season. 




Captain John Talman, Halsey Hill, and Steve 
Swift went unbeaten until the Lehigh meet. 

By using two full teams and alternating his 
men as much as possible, Coach Barnes not only 
gave valuable experience to a greater number of 
wrestlers than usual, but he also developed men 
for next year to replace his graduating regu- 
lars. 

Don Matter, 135-pounder from Dallas, 
Texas, was elected captain of the 1940 team. 
Returning along with him will be Littlejohn, 
Opie, Swift, Wasdell, and Reutt, all monogram 
men. In addition to these, Jeifrey, Beamer, 



Chapman, and Burchfield will be available. To- 
gether with the grapplers coming up from the 
Rat team, these men make the prospects for 
next year pretty good. The introduction of 
spring wrestling this season by Coach Barnes 
will do much to improve the condition and tac- 
tics of the matmen. 

The loss this June by graduation of Captain 
Talman, Kandel, Witt, and Hill will leave defi- 
nite gaps in the line-up and these men will be 
greatly missed next winter. Talman has been a 
consistent performer at 135 lbs. and 145 lbs. on 
the varsity squad for the past three years, and 
this season he made an admirable leader. 





T 6 A ( K 



DICK STRICKLER 
Cdptain 




SONNY CARTER 

Manager 



FiTsr Row, left to right: Dirzulaitis, Moses, Saxe, Scrickler, I CjpMin 1 . Echols. Haislip. Fei 
Second Row: Deaderict, Walton. Merchant, Griffith, Dale. Morrison. Read 
Third Row: Smith, Kump, Rockwood, KiUey, Louthan, Tipton. Pitts. Dance 
Fourth Row: Carter (Manjger) . Coach Read, .Assistant Coach Laslie 





COL. H. M. (SON! READ 



THE TDACK 
SEASON 

RESULTS 

April 1 

V. M. 1 76 1-3; William and Miry 49 2-3 

April 8 

V.M.I 50 ; Virginia 76 

April 15 

V.M.I. 50 1-2; Maryland 75 1-2 

April 22 

V.M.I 80 5-6; V. P. 1 45 1-6 

April 29 

V.M.I 74 5-6; Richmond 511-6 

May 13 

State Meet at Richmond 

May 20 

Southern Conference Meet 




STRICKLER 

KUMP 



ECHOLS 

DEADERICK 



MORRISON 



FERREY 

ROCKWOOD 



MOSES 
MERCHANT 



RESUME 



Although hard hit by graduation, which took 
ten consistent performers from the 1938 team, 
this year's track squad has by hard work and 
patient instruction developed beyond early sea- 
son expectations. Such men as Fish Herring, 
Al Fiedler, Charlie Spohr, Gary Flythe, and 
Frank Sayford were greatly missed this spring, 
but the returning varsity men together with last 
year's Rat team were moulded by Coach "Son" 
Read into a formidable combination. 

V. M. I. defeated William and Mary at Wil- 
liamsburg in the first meet by a wide margin. 
Red Echols took scoring honors with thirteen 
points. 

The powerful University of Virginia track- 
sters defeated V. M. I. 76 to 50 by virtue of 
taking more second and third places than the 
Keydets. Both teams had seven firsts. Captain 



Dick Strickler won the shot-put as usual, and 
added a second in the discus to count eight 
points for V. M. I. Echols also had eight points 
with a first in the discus and a second in the 
shot. 

Maryland's track team, although weak in the 
weights, showed superiority in all running 
events and downed the Cadets 75 1-2 to 50 1-2. 
Paul Shu with ten points and Strickler with six 
were V. M. I.'s high scorers. 

The meet with V. P. I., usually close and ex- 
citing, ended in a Keydet victory by a 80 5-6 to 
45 1-6 score this year. The summary showed 
nine first places for V. M. I. Red Echols' four- 
teen points led the scoring, while Bob Deaderick 
won both dashes to get ten more. 

V. M. I. beat Richmond on a water-soaked 
Alumni Field in the final dual meet of the year 









by 74 5-6 to 51 1-6. Deaderick and Dale each 
collected two first places to lead the way to vic- 
tory. Striclcler again took the shot-put, while 
Haislip and Moses each contributed to the Key- 
det cause. 

Only the State Meet and the Southern Con- 
ference Meet remain at the time this is written. 
From what the team has shown thus far, it 
seems likely that V. M. I. will finish near the top 
in the State Meet. Several of the best perform- 
ers will be sent to the conference meet. 

Captain Dick Strickler, Red Echols, Paul Shu 
and Cliff Weaver have been the outstanding 
weight men this year. Ferrey and Walton stood 
out in the 440 while Rockwood and Kump ran 



the half mile. Moses and Haislip in the low 
hurdles and Moses and Saxe in the highs were 
other consistent point getters. Deaderick and 
Haislip performed ably in the dashes with Dale 
and Dance taking care of the distances. Saxe 
and Merchant were the best high jumpers, while 
Merchant and Pitts did the pole vaulting. Ech- 
ols and Moses broad jumped in addition to 
holding down their own specialties. 

Six monogram men will be lost at graduation. 
Dick Strickler, Red Echols, Bill Haislip, Russ 
Ferrey, Earl Moses, and Nelson Saxe will be 
hard to replace. However, with some fine ma- 
terial coming up from the new cadet ranks, 
these gaps may be filled. 





BASEBALL 



WOODY GRAY 
Captdin 




PAUL BICKFOr.D 
Manager 



First Row, left to right: Jarman. Mitchell, Trzeciak. Gray (Captain), Kovar, Brittingham. Edtt-ards 

Scco„d Row: Shu. Simpson, Irby, Heelv, Carney, Littrell, Thrift 

Thtrd Row: Turner, Miller, Taliaferro, Butler, Lillard, Shelby. Stumpf, Bickford (.Ujnjjrr) 





ALLISON T. (POOLEY) HUBERT 
Coach 

RESULTS 

V. M. 1 10; Bridgewater 

V. M. I. 7; Vermont 

V.M.I 11; William and Mary 

V. M. I. 4; Maryland 



TiJE I93Q 
BASEBALL SEASOH 





V.M.I 


7; North Carolina 


...19 




V.M.I 


5; Virginia 


... 6 




V.M.I 


8; N. C. State 


...9 




V. M. I 


7; North Carolina 


.... 8 




V.M.I 


14; V. P. I 


. . .10 




V. M. I 


— ; Richmond 


....— 




V. M. I 


— ; Wake Forest 


....— 




V.M.I 


— ; Virginia 


...,— 


8 


V.M.I 


— ; William and Mary . . . 


.. . ,— 


3 


V. M. I 


— ; Richmond 


.- . .— 


9 


V. M. I 


— ; Maryland 


....— 


3 


V.M.I 


— ; V. P. I 


. . . . — 









GRAY TRZECIAK 

BRITTINGHAM 



EDWARDS 

THRIFT 






CARNEY 


MITCHELL 


SIMPSON 


TURNER 




LILLARD 

RESUME 


TALIAFERRO 



SHELBY 
MILLER 



Varsity baseball practice got under way early despite 
bad weather and the fact that spring football practice 
was still requiring the services of several good baseball 
prospects. Coach Elmore handled the squad until 
"Pooley" Hubert finished his spring football work. 

The biggest problem of the year was the pitching 
staff. The loss of Roberson and Lugar from last year's 
team robbed the squad of its two best hurlers, and Jim 
Brannaman, who won his monogram last year as a 
pitcher, was declared ineligible. The pitching assign- 
ment was handled by Gus Edwards, converted infielder, 
sophomores Son Shelby and Eddie Stumpf, and John 
Thrift, who turned in several fine relief hurling jobs 
last year. At the present time the season is only half 
over, and the pitchers have already shown promise of 
rounding into excellent shape, each pitcher having turned 
in at least one fine performance. 

The infield positions are being handled very capably 
by Brittingham and Simpson at first, Trzeciak at second. 



Carney, a sophomore, at short, and Mitchell at third. 
Captain Woody Gray, Kovar, and Shu are taking care 
of the outfield posts, and Littrell handling the catching. 
Shu caught for last year's team and is ready to take over 
the same position in case Littrel should receive anv in- 
jury. Heely, Irby, Miller, Taliaferro. Turner, and Jar- 
man provide able replacements and bolster the strength 
of the team. 

The predominant feature of the "39 edition of the 
baseball team is its hitting ability. Captain ^'oodv 
Gray and "Pounding Paul" Shu are home run artists, 
and Kovar, Brittingham, Trzeciak. and Camev are all 
dangerous hitters for anv opposing pitcher. 

The team got off to a great start bv winning its first 
four games. Bridgewater was beaten in the season's 
opener 10 to 8, while \'ermont was the next victim, 
bowing bv a " to 3 count, as Eddie Stumpf hurled toux- 
hit ball. The Kevdets rang up a Southern Conrerence 
victorv bv putting on a seventh inning rallv to down 



William and Mary. Trzeciak and Gray hit hard 
for V. M. I., while Gus Edwards turned in an 
excellent pitching performance in a relief role to 
get credit for the win. 

John Thrift tamed the heavy-hitting Mary- 
land nine and scattered out its five safeties to 
chalk up a 4 to 3 win. Paul Shu's hitting and 
Bud Kovar's outstanding fielding were features 
of the Old Liner game. North Carolina handed 
the Keydets their first setback of the season. 
The Tar Heels' batting power coupled with V. 
M. I. errors piled up a big lead. Shelby's re- 
lief hurling was quite effective, however. Brit- 
tingham hit a home run for V. M. I. with 
the bases loaded. 

Virginia got five unearned runs in the first 
inning, and the Keydets were not able to over- 
come the Cavalier lead, losing 6 to 5. Gray 
and Carney led the hitting for the Barracks 
team. 



V. M. I. dropped a pair of games, each by a 
one-run margin, on the annual Carolina trip. 
N. C. State and North Carolina both came 
from behind to nose out the Cadets. 

V. P. I. was beaten in a free scoring contest. 
Shu, Brittingham, Gray, and Trzeciak paced 
the Keydet attack. 

As this is written, games remain to be played 
with Richmond and Wake Forest on Alumni 
Field and return encounters with Virginia, Wil- 
liam and Mary, Richmond, Maryland, and V. 
P. I. Judging by the early season performances 
and by the team's improved hitting. Coach Hu- 
bert's charges should win a good majority of the 
remaining games. 

The 1939 team will go down as one of the 
best in V. M. I.'s history as a result of its 
heavy hitting, good pitching, and fine team play. 




(DOSS (OUtlTDY 



This year the V. M. I. harriers were be- 
set with hard luck, which accounts for the 
record of one win against two defeats. The 
team was made up entirely of inexperienced 
first year men with the exception of Rudy 
Weiss. 

Captain Russ Ferrey was struck down 
with appendicitis, which prevented him 
from participating for the duration of the 
season. Likewise afflicted was Charlie 
Floyd. This left Jimmy Dale, Ben Kump, 
Charlie Rockwood, Bev Read, Rudy Weiss, 
and Steve Swift, all new men to the sport, 
to carry the burden. 

In the initial meet they handily defeated 
Richmond in the only home meet. The next 
two meets, at the University of Virginia 
and V. P. I., resulted in defeats for V. M. 
I. Sixth place in the State meet was V. 




RUSS FERREY 
Captain 



M. I.'s position, but the determination and 
the spirit of the runners remained high. 

Although the season was not an out- 
standing success, due to unfortunate cir- 
cumstances, it proved to be a verv valuable 
asset by experiencing and seasoning a hith- 
erto untried group of runners for an ex- 
tremely promising season next year. 



First Ro* 
Kump, 
Read, Fe 



Rockwood, Da 



ccond Row: 
Coach Read 
Carter (Manager) 





IRVING 
Captain 



In its third year as a major sport, the 
swimming team has turned in a fine record, 
due entirely to the diUgent practice of the 
team under the skillful coaching of Major 
Walter Lowry. In spite of the frigid water, 
the broken diving board, the pool being 
closed temporarily to head off an epidemic 
of colds, and the stiff knees and sinus trou- 
ble of several on the team, every man stuck 
it out, and by the time of the first meet, it 



SWIMMI[1(i TEAM 



looked as if V. M. I. really had a promising 
swimming team. 

The season was begun nicely with a 
5 1-24 win over V. P. I., the victorious team 
being composed of five seniors: Captain 
Irving, Jones, HobUtzell, Meem, and 
Rubira; six juniors: Hardaway, Dominick, 
White, Faulkner, Braznell, and Pollard; 
and one sophomore, Stengele. Accidents 
caused a 48-27 loss to Virginia. The team, 
broke even on the Carolina trip by down- 
ing N. C. Stat-e 43-32 and then losing to 
Duke 41-34. V. M. I. outswam U. N. C. 
with a 52-23 score, but lost the last meet 
to Clemson, 30-45. The team finished up 
the season by taking third place in the 
Southern Conference. Irving, Hardaway, 
White, and Stengele should be especially 
praised, for they comprised the unbeaten 
400-yard relay team that lowered the 
Southern Conference record by over four 
seconds. 








standing, left to right: 
Stengele. Faulkner, 
Dominick, Hardaway, 
White, Wolcott (Mgr,). 

Seated, left to right: 
Braznell, Jones, 



TENNIS TEAM 



Four years ago V. M. I. did not have a 
tennis team, but today it is one of the com- 
ing sports of the Institute. In 1937 it was 
taken under the auspices of the Athletic 
Association and at that time tennis at V. 
M. I. began its upward march. Let us give 
credit to Coach J. B. Cabell, whose patient 
and helpful instruction was a determining 
factor in the team's success. 

Captain Billy Verell, monogram man in 
the sport since his third class year, played 
his usual steady game all season. This 
year's team was lucky in having Hugh 
Gantt and Luke Hill, promising sopho- 
mores, who filled the places left by Boots 
Taylor '' and Dick Booth, of the class 
of '38. Hugh and Luke, we are looking 
for you to go places in your next two years 
of tennis at V. M. I. 

Lee Brayton came through and plaved 
fine tennis all year, while Chun Lau and 
Jimmy Smith could be counted on for 
points in any match. 




BILLY VERELL 
Captain 



The team opened with an 8 to 1 victory 
over American University, but was de- 
feated by Dartmouth and University of 
Virginia; it came back to conquer Loyola 
College 6 to L 

Matches are yet to be played with Wil- 
liam and Mary, Richmond. Marvland, 
Wake Forest, Hampden-Sydney, and Em- 
ory and Henry. 



Left to Right; 
Capt. Cabell (Co 
Verell (Captain) 
Lau, Maling, Clai 
Smith, Hill 
Satterfield 
Gantt, Brayton 
Peebles (Managei 





-*^^'^lsa 



'^m^'^^ ^^% - '^'- 



„4^f^; J^.%T-.^y^ A "'*r>' 



'^^J. 





RAY BLACKMON 
Captain 



The rifle team this winter had the best 
season that it has enjoyed for several years. 
It emerged triumphant in the great major- 
ity of its numerous postal matches, fired 
against other collegiate teams throughout 
the country, bowing by close scores to Navy, 
Maryland, and Army. In addition, it 
scored victories in close shoulder-to-shoul- 
der matches with the Harrisonburg Rifle 
and Pistol Club and the Old Dominion 



NfLE TEAM 



Rifle Club of Richmond. Also, the rifle 
team made a very creditable showing at 
the Intercollegiate Rifle Matches in Wash- 
ington, and stood high in the list of com- 
petitors despite the disadvantage of a sud- 
den change in positions and the type of tar- 
get used. 

The turnout for this year's team was sur- 
prisingly large, and building around a nu- 
cleus of last year's veterans, Sergeant Zoll- 
man was able to create one of the finest 
teams that he has turned out. In addition 
to Captain Ray Blackmon, other outstand- 
ing performers were Love, Aurand, Moser, 
Drewry, and Stevens. Stevens also had 
the added distinction of being high scorer 
in the Hearst Trophy Matches. The team 
is to be congratulated on its hard work and 
fine showing, for only thus is the sport kept 
alive at V. M. I. Great credit is also due 
Sergeant Zollman for his interest and his 
patient and invaluable help. 




First Row: 




Shultz, Stevens 




Blackmon (Captain 


) 


Sgt. Zollman (Coc 


ch) 


Mit:hell, Ragland 




Love 




Second Row; 




Dance, Smith, Gor 


npf 


Howton, Moser 




Arnold 




Third Row: 




Syme. Drewry 




Bailey (Manager) 





PISTOL TEAM 



Each year the V. M. I. Pistol Team is 
selected from the high men on the company 
intramural teams. This year, due to the 
great interest shown in the sport by Major 
Heiner, there were nearly a hundred men 
firing in the intramural matches, from 
which an excellent team was selected. Ma- 
jor Heiner also inaugurated a Rat Pistol 
Team which had a very good season and 
furnished experience that will stand them 
in good stead in future varsity matches. 

This year's varsity was captained by 
Oscar West, who was also second high 
man, shooting a high total for the season 
of 274. Edens was high man with a 277 
and Stevens third with a 273. Smoicey 
Knight, as manager, arranged a busy and 
successful season for the team. In the mail 
matches V. M. I. came out about even with 
the competitors, and won shoulder-to- 




shoulder matches with the Petersburgh Ri- 
fle and Pistol Club and the Third Cavalry 
at Fort Meyer. 

Walter Edens and Jimmy Moser are 
captain and manager respectively of next 
year's team. To aid these men, many of 
this year's veterans will be on the firing line 
along with new men developed on this 
year's Rat team, who show promise. 



Ragland, Riddick 
West (Captain) 
Maj. Heiner (Coa. 
Knight (Manager) 
Magoffin, Little 

econd Row: 



Edens 

Third Row: 
King, Naisawald 
Wiiitins, Wright 





WILLIS RIDDICK 
Captain 



The gym team, working annually from 
the middle of April until Finals, is V. M, 
I.'s oldest athletic team, and although gym 
is no longer an intercollegiate sport, it has 
made its place in every Finals program a 
spectacular one. The team works under 
the direction of Major M. G. Ramey, who 



(iVM TtAM 



is largely responsible for its splendid per- 
formance. 

This year the team put on an exhibition 
in Williamsburg. Morrison and Quinn 
worked individually on the horizontal bar, 
and May, Riddick, and Nichols on the 
parallel bars. Nichols would doubtlessly 
have been the best gymnast ever to attend 
V. M. I.; he was a Southern A. A. U. 
champion before entering. His loss will 
be a great setback to the group. 

Several fine artists are outstanding this 
year: Rubira, Harris, Richards, and 
O'Keeffe, tumblers; Phil May and Willis 
Riddick, parallel bar performers; and Rich- 
ards and Thrasher, with their arm to arm 
tumbling combinations. 

The physical perfection, skill, balance, 
and coordination which a gymnast attains 
are equaled in no other sport. 




First Re 


w: 


Matte 


r, Chapman 


Quinr 




Riddi 


k (Captain) 


Barne 


s, Fallat 


Davis 




Second 


Row: 


O'Ke 


ffe, Wills 


Glove 


r, May, Ham 


Richa 


rds 


Third R 


ow: 


Wilki 


s, Totten 


Davis 


Howton 



HODSE SHOW TEAM 



The horse show team at V. M. I. holds 
a unique place in the extra-curricular activ- 
ities of the Corps. This year, under the 
guiding and able hand of Captain Morton, 
the best riders from the cavalry and the 
artillery units were selected and carefully 
schooled. 

A team of eight men, consisting of Cap- 
tain Chiles, West, Kadick, Becker, Hughes, 
Darden, Edens, and Barksdale, was sent to 
Richmond to participate in the Deep Run 
Hunt trials in late October. The team 
showed up exceptionally well in all events, 
and its members were complimented highly 
for the excellent horsemanship shown. Al- 
though Hughes was the onlv man to take 
individual honors, valuable experience was 
gained, and the remainder of the team re- 
ceived much applause from the spectators. 

The next show for the team was at the 
Glenmore Hunt Club Hunter Trials in 
Siaunton. Cadets Chiles, West, Edens, 




JOHN CHILES 



and Barksdale were the able representatives 
who participated in this gala affair, and 
again the boys in grey came out with many 
compliments. 

To the state-wide horse show in Lynch- 
burg went West, Hughes, Darden, Kadick, 
and Edens. In the remaining shows, namely. 
Hollins, Southern Seminary, V. P. I., and 
Finals, the entire team is expected to see 
quite a bit of action. 



Left to Right: 




Barksdale, We 


St 


Haley, Hughe 




Capt. Morton 


{Co 


Chiles (Capta 


n) 


Edens, Kadick 


Da 


O'Connor, Ka 


idel 





The polo squad at the end of the past 
year found itself minus its coach, Captain 
Horton, who reorganized polo here at the 
Institute and coached the team for the past 
two seasons. The job of coaching was 
taken over by Captain Thayer, who has 
done very fine work in this capacity. He 
was faced with the loss of most of the reg- 
ular players, namely, "Tango" Smith, 
"Cherry" Charrington and Dick Hutchin- 



THE POLO TEAM 



son. So he started the fall season with 
the training of the old ponies and trying 
to find some likely prospects among the new 
remounts issued to the Institute. At the 
same time last year's substitutes were being 
groomed to take the places of the regulars 
lost from the squad. 

The spring season opened with a call for 
new men and the barracks responded with 
fifty men reporting to try their hand at one 
of the fastest and hardest games played at 
the Institute. Captain Thayer worked 
these men for two weeks, finally picking five 
new men to the squad. 



The squad was made up of the following 
men: Captain Mac Tabb, "Babe" Kerr, 
"Podo" Emerson, Heber Thornton, Green- 
wood, Hardaway, P. B. May, Downing, 
Keesee, Jacobs, Stengele, Puller, Hughes, 
White, Shultz, Thompson, and Val Par- 
ham, manager. 




First Row: 
Parham (Manager) 
White, Kerr, Downing 
Tabb, Emerson 
Hardaway, May 
Capt. Thayer (Coach) 

Second Row: 
Jacobs, Stengele 
Shultz, Thornton 
Keesee, Moncure 
Hughes 



DAT f T B A L L 



The Rat team, coached by Albert Elmore 
and Col. Heflin, won two of five games and 
gained praise for alert, aggressive play 
against heavier and more experienced oppo- 
nents. 

Although outplaying their opponents 
throughout a great part of the game, the 
Baby Squadron lost its opening fight to the 
University of Virginia freshmen 7-6. Vir- 
ginia scored first in the third quarter, and 
soon after Catlett tallied for V. M. I. on a 
pass from Pritchard; the latter's extra point 
try was wide. Later Pritchard missed a 
difficult field goal attempt by inches. 

The Little Red Team showed plenty of 
power defensively and offensively in defeat- 
ing the W. and M. Division in Norfolk 
14-0. Catlett scored twice and Pritchard 
converted both times. Two more touch- 
downs failed by inches. 

Playing against the strongest freshman 
team in Carolina or Virginia, the Rats cov- 



ered themselves with glory by holding the 
Little Deacons scoreless in the first half. 
Pritchard's beautiful running and passing 
were constant scoring threats. V. M. L was 
in scoring position twice later, but Wake 
Forest tightened down and held. 

The University of Maryland freshmen 
made the most of a weight advantage on a 
muddy field to defeat the V. M. L Rats 
13-6. Nugent scored V. M. L's lone touch- 
down, although the Little Keydets threat- 
ened to score several times. The line play 
of Banks, Walker and Skladany was out- 
standing as well as the performance of the 
backfield. 

The Little Keydets, superior in every de- 
partment and playing inspired football, de- 
feated one of the best V. P. L frosh teams 
for the last few years 13-6. "Bosh" Pritch- 
ard led his teammates and scored the win- 
ning touchdown. 

Every man plaved his position well and 
showed the spirit typical of the team. 



First Row, left to right: 
F. C. Jones, Deahl 
Banks, Sl<ladany 
(Captain), Snedeker, 
Walker, Bunch 

Second Row: 

Parker, Pritchard 
Mathews, Nugent 
Catlett, Sutherland 
Dillard, Donald 

Third Row: 

Sheahan, Dorrier 
Lapp, Drake, Purdum 
Baker, Baer, Love 

Fourth Row. Tosti 
Gilliam, Wilson 
Cabell, Hagan 
Wray, Leech 
T. R. Jones 

Fifth Row: 




HT BASKETBALL 



Although winning only four of its ten 
games, the 1939 Rat basketball team under 
the tutelage of Coach A. B. Elmore, de- 
velcped into a fairly formidable aggrega- 
tion. 

Starting slowly and playing the first two 
games without the services of Pritchard and 
Catlett, the Rats lost to Glass High of 
Lynchburg and the University of Virginia 
freshmen. The Little Red Team was no 
match for the powerful Greenbrier quintet, 
but went down fighting and took its third 
straight defeat. 

The team took on new life the next week 
and beat the V. P. L freshmen in '94 Hall. 
Catlett's fine all-round play was the high- 
light of the game. A return game with 
Greenbrier found the Little Keydets again 
outclassed, as they could not match the 
height and floor work of the prep school 
team. 



The V. P. L freshmen were winners over 
the Rats in an exciting contest played in 
Blacksburg by a 37 to 36 count. The last 
half was a "see-saw" affair, with the lead 
changing hands several times. 

The Keydets then began playing a better 
brand of ball as they ran up three straight 
wins. Twice the Jefferson High team from 
Roanoke fell before the determined attack 
of the Cadet cagers. Glass High was like- 
wise beaten to avenge the early season de- 
feat. 

The Virginia freshmen rallied in the clos- 
ing minutes to down the Rats 40 to 35 in 
the final game of the season. 

Captain Warren Pike, Bosh Pritchard, 
Jim O'Keeffe, Ralph Jones, and Nelson 
Catlett stood out all during the season and 
should make excellent varsity material next 
year. Stallings and Woodward saw action 
in all ten games. 




, left to right: Q-Kecffe. Stallings. Parker, Catlett, Pike (Ciptj.n), Sexton, Grindle, Leech, Geary 
iCoJch). Pritchard, Young, Oakey, Wilson, Byrd, Jones, Woodward, Weller, Matthews, Ellerson (Mjnjgfr) 



MT W I! E S T L I N (i 



Lieutenant - Colonel Heflin, veteran 
coach, performed his annual feat of turn- 
ing out an aggressive, well-balanced group 
of wrestlers from a squad which had no 
previous experience. The team was cap- 
tained by Banks, 165-pounder, and should 
provide some able replacements for the var- 
sity next year. Among those showing 
marked ability were John McCullough, 
Jimmy Dorrier, John Embrey, and Billy 
Walker. Walker was closely pushed for 
the right to wrestle the heavyweight division 
by Deahl. 

Due to the cancellation of two matches 
with Augusta Military Academy, only three 
matches were held. In their initial appear- 
ance V. M. I. defeated V. P. 1. 29-3. 
Walker decisioned his opponent, although 
giving him nearly twenty pounds advan- 
tage. Embrey started V. M. I. off by gain- 
ing a fall, while Banks, Wilson, and Suth- 
erland also won by falls. 



In their second match, the first year mat- 
men decisively defeated Navy's Plebes 21- 
11. Hughes, McCullough, and Dorrier 
won by falls, while Walker and Embrey 
took decisions. 

The University of North Carolina fresh- 
men defeated V. M. I.'s yearlings by the 
close score of 19-15 to capture the unofficial 
Southern Conference freshman wrestling 
title and hand a V. M. I. Rat wrestling 
team its first defeat in the past two years. 
All of V. M. I.'s points came as a result of 
falls when Edwards, Dorrier, and Walker 
pinned their men, and if V. M. I. had won 
one more bout the score would have showed 
a Keydet victory. 

Thus the team turned in a record of two 
wins and one loss and showed the same 
fight which has kept V. M. I. teams at the 
top. Colonel Heflin's fine work as coach 
should receive much credit. 




Ftri, Row. Ufl It, r,tht: Erabrev, Hughes McCullough Ed^ardb W iKon b , I Domer. Walker 

Second Row: Col. Heflin (Cojch) . Jeschke, Hooker, SurherUnd, SkUdam , Deahl, Flood. Mor>, , L.ipp, Ba.«.ch, Barefield {M.zr^sir'l 



I! A T TRACK 



The V. M. I. Rats won their initial meet 
against the Wilham and Mary Papooses by 
a comfortable score of 96-20, completely 
swamping opposition and allowing only one 
first place to be scored against them. In 
the second meet of the season, the Baby 
Keydets lost a thrilling contest by virtue of 
one first place, that of the discus, to the 
strong Cavalier freshmen by the close score 
of 61-56. The Rats' losing streak was 
short-lived, however, and they came back 
strongly to win over Glass High of Lynch- 
burg by a decisive score of 86-3 1. 

Son Read's baby trackmen completely 
snowed V. P. I.'s freshmen under to con- 
tinue their winning streak. Again the discus 
proved to be the Rats' weak spot, being the 
only event in which they failed to place and 
to take first. The score, 84 1-2 to 32 1-2, 
is the highest that a V. M. I. Rat track 
team has enjoyed over the Tech freshmen 
for several years. 



"Bosh" Pritchard, potential four sport 
letterman, paced the squad the entire sea- 
son with his consistent winning in the 
dashes and the broad jump. Barclay is an 
excellent prospect for the varsity in that he 
is the best hurdler that Coach Read has 
handled in the past several seasons. Both 
Pike and Edwards have approached the var- 
sity mark in the pole vault, and should 
prove valuable for next year. Walker has 
been undefeated in the shot, and Catlett in 
the javelin. Jones is an excellent distance 
man, and is well supported by Zmeeker, 
miler and half-mile pacer. 

With three possible Southern Confer- 
ence champions in Barclay, Catlett, and 
Jones, Coach Read is working his squad 
hard in preparation for the conference 
meet in the middle of May as this is sent 
to press. 




Fnil Row. Ujl lo rithr: Hughes, Embrey. Pritchard, Tosti, Zmeeker, Davis, Carmine. Pike, Oakey. DiUard 
Second Row: Young. Walker, Swain, Chewning, Wright, M. Jones, Guy, Satterfield, Jones 
Third Row: Bassich, Edwards, Smith, Sutherland, Stumpf, Folkes, Catlett 
Fouuh Row: Walker (Mjnuger), Col. Read (Co^ic*), Laslie (Aisist^nl Coach) 



[222] 



HAT (DOSS (OUNTDY 



A large part of the success of the Rat 
Cross Country Team must go to Colonel 
Read, who took a group of boys who had 
never run cross country before and devel- 
oped them into state champions. The splen- 
did interest and cooperation of these boys 
contributed greatly to the team's success. 

The team participated in only two meets 
during the season, one being with Virginia 
and William and Mary in Charlottesville, 
and the other being the state meet at Wash- 
ington and Lee. 



Eddie Swain ran first for V. M. I. in 
both of the meets, and was followed closely 
by Ed Jones and Meriwether Jones. 
Hughes, Embrey, Edwards, and Bassick 
were also well up in the finish of the races. 

The whole team was very well balanced, 
and all of the men learned one of the most 
important things in cross countrv running, 
to stay together and up in front during the 
race. 

With such a splendid record behind them 
this year, all of these men should be val- 
uable assets to the varsity harriers next year. 




tnst Ko». lefl lo r:eh,: Emhrcv, Hughes, Swam, lones. Edwards 
Second Row: Cot, Read (Cojch) , M. Jones. Bassich, Walker ^.\(jnuj,T) 



HAT BASEBALL 



The V. M. I. Rat team had a decided 
pick-up this year. The first year ball club 
was the best the school has had for a num- 
ber of years. With their early season men- 
tor, Jim Branaman, and their experienced 
coach, Elmore, the Rats rounded out into 
an especially hard hitting bunch. As usual, 
a preseason squad was composed of green 
but willing boys. Coach Elmore's stress 
upon batting and fast fielding made them 
a smooth combination to match any oppo- 
nent. With a bang-up start of winning 
three straight games, the Rats got off to a 
highly successful season. By carrying on 
their fine start, the Rats have made an ad- 
mirable record. Indeed, Coach Elmore and 
the school should be proud of the "little 
nine's" work. 

Always with an eye for next year, the 
chances for the Rats to make the varsity 
squad are right fair. The team shows some 



fine material, but several of Elmore's pro- 
teges stood out particularly well. Catlett 
turned in a fine performance behind the 
plate. Jones at first and Wray at third 
were strong on infielding; Dorrier excelled 
in the outfield, while Spessard and Pritch- 
ard handled the pitching equally well. Next 
year we hope the varsitv will have openings 
for these players, but it's a tough fight. 
The Corps is counting on these Rats to con- 
tinue their heavy slugging there. 

Coach Elmore, who has handled the Rat 
teams for several years, should especially be 
congratulated on this year's aggregation. 
The players themselves, who practiced hard 
and faithfully, should be praised for their 
fine teamwork and batting. If next year's 
nine aims at this year's record they will have 
a high goal to attain. We congratulate 
the Rats and Elmore. 




Second Row: Jeschke, Wood* 
'2h;rd Ron: Tucker I manager), King, William 



kL.„li,j„tl,, U^n,^,. .N'a.>aualJ. Nugent, L 
rd, Bytd, Brown, Wray. Moore, Spessard 
, Hooker, Vestal, King, Williams, Pickett, 




MAJOR M. G. RAMEY 
Director 



The intramural sports at V. M. I. are 
handled by the Intramural Council, which 
is composed of a senior manager and a 
company manager from each company. 
Major Ramey, who is Director of Intramu- 
ral Athletics, acts more or less as chairman 



of the council and is largely responsible for 
the success and excellence of intramural 
athletics at V. M. I. He is ably assisted 
by Captain Vose. 



The Intramural Council in regular meet- 
ings settles questions of schedules, eligibil- 
ity, rules and methods of play, conduct of 
games, and any disputes which may arise. 
The individual managers are responsible 
for directing their companies' teams. 



It is the aim of the council to have every 
cadet participate in intramural sports. The 
extent to which this aim is realized is grati- 
fying. 




Sealed, lei: ro rtght: Love, Moses, Diuguid, Talman, Babcock, GoUadav. Emerscn 
Sljndins: Jarman, Hudgins, Edwardi. Major Rame%-, Captain Vose. Diggs, Riddict, Knowie 




HTHMUI^ALS 
SHAPS 



1. Two points for the gray shirts. 

2. Vertical parallel work. 

3. A champion. 

4. Strenuous game, this handball. 

5. Intramural tennis. 

6. Competitive tumbling is an intra- 
mural sport, too. 

7. One-two-three strikes and out! 

8. Podo pitching. 

9. A trifle rough, but it's good for vou. 

10. W^ater polo. 

11. Graceful gymnastics. 




'^ 



ACTIVITIES 





MAJOR-GENERAL JOHN A. LEJEUNE 
1929-1938 



Born January 10, 1867, in Pointe Coupee Parish, Lou- 
isiana; reared on a cotton plantation and received his 
primary education from his mother; attended preparatory 
school at the Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 
1883, continuing there through his sophomore year; 
entered Naval Academy, 1884, graduating in June, 1888; 
served two years as a naval cadet; commissioned as Sec- 
ond Lieutenant in Marine Corps, July 1, 1890; as First 
Lieutenant, served on U. S. S. Cincinnati in Spanish 
War; as Major in 1903, commanded the battalion of 
Marines that landed on the Isthmus of Panama at the 
time of the separation of that country from Colombia; 
as Lieutenant-Colonel, commanded Marines in Philip- 
pine Islands, 1908-'09; graduated from War College, 
1910; detailed with army in the occupation of Vera 
Cruz, Mexico, 1914; commanded Second Division, A. 
E. F., in World War, from July, 1918, to August, 
1919; Major-General and Commandant of Marines, 
July 1, 1920, to July 1, 1929; Superintendent of V. M. 
I., 1929-1938. 



WEST SIDE OF BARRACKS, 1917 



NICHOLS ENGINEERING HALL 



^•" IV 



■^* 






1^-^P 





I! (i A N I Z A T I N S 



THE BOMB Of 



I N E T E E N T H I D T y - N I N E 



THE HONOR COURT 



Nothing is more an integral part of V. M. I. 
than its high code of honor, upheld with almost 
fanatic zeal by the corps of cadets through its 
Honor Court. Stronger than the spirit, the loy- 
alties, and the tradition, the honor system is the 
very essence of our existence here. It is the guid- 
ing factor in our four-year cadetship, and when 
we leave we carry with us the oldest and finest 
principle in the history of mankind — that of 
honor. Should ever our sense of high moral in- 
tegrity falter, the very foundations of the Insti- 
tute, which for these hundreds long years have 
withstood all ravages of time, would totter, and 
the glorious V. ]\I. I. which we all revere and 
love so much would cease to exist. Come the 
time when the word of a V. M. I. rnan can be 
questioned and thousands of stout hearts break the 
world over. Under the system as it exists today 
the fourth classmen are at once impressed with 
the supreme importance of their trust and with 
the high standards which are to be required of 
them. Throughout their cadetship their lives are 
untainted by suspicion and mistrust, and each 
comes to realize the inestimable value of honor 
in all his dealings. He finds that there are only 
two wavs of doing things, the wrong way and the 



V. M. I. way, and he leaves here with a worthy 
criterion that will always remain his guide. 

The strength of the honor system lies in the 
fact that it is an organ of the cadet body itself, 
a system of the Corps, for the Corps, and by the 
Corps. As the nucleus of this powerful system 
we have the Honor Court, a group selected from 
the several classes whose trust it is to uphold the 
high honor code and to pass on such questions of 
honor as may come before it. This impressive 
group is composed of men whose integrity and 
equitable sense of values is outstanding, men who 
have earned the undying respect of their Brother 
Rats and of the Corps at large. 

To say that the men on the court must be of 
unquestionable character is unnecessary. They 
lend strength to their position and cause, not 
through the rats, but rather through the example 
which they set. Being members of the Corps, 
they are fully able to understand and cope with 
any situation which might arise, and are in a 
position to give a fair, unbiased opinion. In their 
hands rests the welfare of V. \l. I., and their 
only interest is to preserve it, a function which 
they have performed so honorably throughout the 
glorious century of our history. 




Sealed, left to right: Ticc. Riddlebcrger. Irving iPttiident). Gray. Bond, Hudgil 
Stjndms: Navis. Prideaux, Flinn, Merchant, Heely 




Next in importance to the Honor Court in the 
life of the Corps is the General Committee. This 
body of cadets was established to protect V. M. I. 
traditions, class privileges, and the reputation of 
the Corps. It, of course, does not deal with 
questions of honor; however, it does concern 
itself with those relating to courtesy. It also 
enforces all generally accepted new cadet cus- 
toms. 

The General Committee has sanely and 
thoughtfully taken the place of the hazing which 
before was so liable to become a vicious and 
abused means of enforcing discipline. It is by 
no means an inquisition, but rather a modern 
tribunal which shows no partiality. Meeting on 
periodic Saturday nights throughout the year, the 
court is composed of the Honor Court members 
of the first class and the officers of the second 
and third classes. 

But the General Committee is not onh' a dis- 
ciplinary body. It endeavors to prevent viola- 
tions of its rules which it would otherwise be 
called on to punish by not only gladly interpreting 
any doubtful points of cadet law, but by setting 
the example for others to emulate. 

At the earliest possible date during their first 
few weeks of orientation, the fourth class is in- 
formed of the rules of the Cjeneral Committee. 



They then become acquainted with the traditions 
which every V. M. I. man holds so dear, the 
hard-won and jealously guarded class privileges, 
and the reputation which makes V. M. I. an 
object of admiration to both the Corps and the 
friends of the Institute. The standards have been 
set. To live up to them is a difficult matter, one 
requiring courage and fortitude, yet a matter in 
which the whole Corps takes pride. 

The General Committee, like the Honor 
Court, derives authority from the Superintendent. 
It is fully empowered to deliver the penalties, 
confinements, and tours which it imposes for fail- 
ure to abide by the regulations. The General 
Committee has the full cooperation of the Corps; 
it is considered the duty of each cadet to report 
all violations of the rules which are posted on the 
lockers in every room in barracks. 

By its legislation concerning the public conduct 
of \'. M. I. cadets, the General Committee has 
set up a code of ethics which is of inestimable 
\-alue in later life; the rules concerning class priv- 
ileges foster a spirit of sportsmanship and courtesy 
for which V. M. I. men are noted ; and the tradi- 
tions which it maintains give background and 
breeding to e\ery cadet. In its quiet, effective, 
and efficient way, the General Committee makes 
V. M. I. a school of, bj-, and for gentlemen. 



THE GENERAL COMMITTEE 



A A 



■^I'ftilfp 



THE BOMB OF NINETEEN T H I I! T Y - N I N E 




HOP COMMITTEE 



Responsibility for all dances given during the 
year rests on the Hop Committee, which is 
composed of the men .on the previous year's 
Second Class Finance Committee. The 1939 
Hop Committee initiated a new practice by talc- 
ing over the duties beginning with Finals, thus 
relieving the graduating first classmen of re- 
sponsibility. 

Finals of 1938 saw Jimmie Dorsey and Will 
Osborne supplying the music for one of the 
most successful sets in years. To Openings 
came Blue Barron with "Music of Yesterday 
and Today . . ." while Will Osborne reappeared 
for the important Ring Figure dances at 
Thanksgiving. Bunny Berrigan provided swing 
for Midwinters, and finally came the incom- 
parable Larry Clinton for Easters. For those 
informal but indispensable First Class Hops the 
Commanders showed their ability to fill the 
same orchestra stand that had held the bigger 
bands. 

To the 1940 Hop Committee the committee 
of '39 leaves a tradition and a responsibility. 




Semed, left lo right: Chiles, Bond, Gray, Digges, Hastings, Jarman, Morrison 
.. standing: Baldwin, Bernard, Mitchell, Edwards, Slaughter, Littrell, Meem. Brittingham 
g: Hudgins, Johnson, Ellerson, Parham, Ellis, Tabb, McCarthy, Burgess, Moseley, Riddleberger (absent) 




Standing: O'Connor, Vincent, Waters, Flou.rs. Ihompson, D„«ni 

Baldwin, Moser, 

Service is the unofficial motto of the Second 
Class Finance Committee. This group showed a 
high degree of efficiency in carrying out its double 
duty of financing the two big hop sets of the year, 
Ring Figure on Thanksgiving week-end and Finals, 
and at the same time operating many convenient 
services for the Corps. 

The list of the services they furnished includes 
many diverse items. Eddie O'Connor handled the 
delivery and subscription fees for all newspapers, 
and in doing so kept the Corps extremely well 
posted on current events. Almost any magazine 
could be delivered by Sid Vincent, and nearly 
every room subscribed to one or two. 



,,r, BiMun, M,.r,f,.int, H..,.li 
\.«3,t, i-din,. Waller, la, 
ington. Miller 



Thrift, Gray. VanPai 



The movies regularly presented on all free nights 
filled a need for diversion that can be satisfied in 
no other way. This year the quality cf the pic- 
tures Buck Thompson booked hit a new high in 
popular opinion. Attractive and distinctive sta- 
tionery and Christmas cards were also sold bv 
members of the Committee. 

The Blue Room, where refreshments could be 
bought during hops prospered under Allen Kee- 
see's supervision, and the delivery of llowers to 
dates during dances was managed by John Cowart 
and Toddy Walker. The funds from the Second 
Class Show were added to the proceeds from the 
various concessions, and will revert to the treasury- 
of the 1940 Hop Committee. 




SECOND CLASS 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 



BROWN, Chairm 
FALLAT. Treasur. 




THE BOMB Of NINETEEN T H I D T Y = N 1 N E 




GENE HUDGINS 



As familiar as the cadets in grey, more necessary 
than the O. D.'s bray, monuments of duty 
throughout the day: We proudly present the In- 
stitute's very own, those of the red sash who faith- 
fully take the guard teams through storms, fires, 
and shirt-tail parades. These sterling First Class- 
men day by day prove to those in doubt that a 



OFFICERS OF 
THE GUARD 



capable, courageous, and conscientious caretaker of 
the barracks guard is a necessary requirement for 
any "superior" guard tour. 

Banquets come and banquets go, but the annual 
dinner given by the O. G.'s Association will be 
looked back upon as a highlight. This year the 
group was honored by the presence of Major Leslie 
German and Coach Sam Barnes, both adding im- 
measurably to the rollicking occasion. One of 
them, however, not only added something to but 
also took something away from the dinner — out- 
witting all other entries in the evening's contest, 
Major German walked away with the O. G.'s 
coveted loving cup. 

There will be others to fill their places in the 
years to come, but the O. G.'s of '39 can proudly 
point to a record that will be hard to beat. 



II 



THE HEALTHFVL AHO PUAUNT ABODE OF A CROWD Of HONORABLE 
•/OVTHS PRiSSJNC VP THE HIU Of SCIENCE WITH NOBLE EMVIATION 
A CFLATIFYING SPECTACLE AN HONOR.TO OVR. COVNTR.V AND OVR 
STATE OBJECTS Of HONEST PR.IDE TOTHEIR. INSTR.VCTOR.S AND FAIR. 
SPECIMENS OF CmZEN SOLDIEHS ATTACHED TO THEIR.- NATIVE STATE 
PKOVD OF HEP. FAME AND P,EADY IN EVER.Y TIME OF DEEPEST PEB.IL 





The Class of Forty chose straight comedy for 
its dramatic presentation to the Easter Hop crowd. 
The play chosen turned out to be that perennial 
favorite, "Charley's Aunt," by Brandon Thomas. 
Most years this entertainment results in a group 
of homemade skits, but Malcolm McKinnon, the 
director, decided to court the laughter of the 
crowd in a more formal manner. 

Ralph Sessoms took the lead as Jack Chesney 
and John MacRae portrayed Lord Fancourt Bab- 
berly in almost a professional manner. The play is 
a light story of an impersonation of a wealthy Bra- 
zilian widow by a student at St. Olde's College at 
Oxford. MacRae played the student who imperson- 
ates the old woman in order to help Sessoms, and 
Larry Goldsmith as Charley Wykeman, another 
undergraduate, win the favor of Kitty Verdun (F. 
P. Rhett) and Amy Spettigiie (L. B. Crafton) . 

The plot was complicated by the efforts of Mr. 
Stephen Spettigue (John Bowman) , who is the 
guardian of Kitty and the uncle of Amy, to pre- 
vent any romance bursting into bloom. Fancourt 
is drafted to impersonate Charley's aunt when she 
fails to arrive and act as chaperone. He performs 
so well that Mr. Spettigue and Sir Francis Chesney 
(Andy Turner) propose on the basis that he is a 



wealthy widow. The late arrival of Charley's real 
aunt (D. S. Conner) and Babberly's sweetheart 
(R. D. Patton) complicate matters, but they 
quickly straighten out at the end. 

MacRae's ad libbing added much to the Corps' 
enjoyment of the show. Other actors were Ben 
Harvey as Brassett, a butler, E. S. Granger as 
Farmer, another butler, and G. L. Newbold as 
Maud, a maid. 

Much credit is due the technical staff. Malcolm 
B. MacKinnon did a superb job of directmg, as- 
sisted by W. G. Reynolds. E. I. Brown served 
as business manager and A. G. Fallat assisted him. 
Charlie Beach managed the properties and D. G. 
McMiUin handled the publicin,-. Other members 
of the technical staff were: \'. J. Thompson and 
F. R. Torrington, program managers: W . S. 
Griffith, electrician: H. E. McCredy. assistant elec- 
trician; J. W. Kohnstamm, stage manager: E. B. 
Bradford, assistant stage manager: R. T. Vk'right. 
R. P. Smith, J. H. Grant, L. G. Porter, and A. H. 
Williams, stage crew. Colonel T. A. E. Moselev 
and Captain H. N. Dillard served as faculty- ad- 
visers and Bailev Barnes, of the first class, gave 
valuable aid with the stage props. 



SECOND CLASS SHOW 



3 9 




9 3 9 



THE BOMB Of NINETEEN T H I P T Y = N I N E 



T 
W 
E 



9 
3 
9 

B 





w. H. McCarthy 

Editor-in-Chief 



B 




W. A. BOND 

Business Manager 



*^. 



DIGGES 

Assijtant Edito 



JONES 

Asiocidte Editor 



TOBEY 
Associate Editor 



LOVE 
Associate Editor 



JARMAN 
Sports Editor 




SMITHEY 
Sports Editor 



tviOSELEY 

Art and Ptioto Editor 



CARTER RIDDLEBERGER 

Cartoonist First Class Section 



BURGESS 
Advertising Ma.iaga 



CHILES 
Collector 



WEST 

Collector 




LinRELL 
Collector 



3 9 



J. ^ 



9 3 9 



T N E BOMB Of 



N [ T E E H T H I I! T y - N I N E 



T 
N 
E 



9 
3 


C 


9 


















/ 




ANDREW 

Editor-in-Chief 



ELLERSON 

Business Manager 



HUDGINS FOSQUE SMITHEY 

Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor Assistant Sports Edito 



CARPENTER FRASER 

Exchange Editor ColunnnJit 




ri 



-^ ^ '^ -lit 



p^-4^^ 





BURGESS 




COX 




TUCKER 






PASCO 


WOLCOn 


Columnist 


Subsc 


ription Man 


ager 


Advertising Man 


ager 


Circ 


ulation Manager 


Staff Secretary 



CHASE STROOP ADAMS McMILLIN BEACH 

Alumni Editor Exchange Editor Assistant Sports Editor Associate Editor Sports Associate 




GILLIAM 
Associate Editor 



HUNDLEY 
Associate Editor 



MONCURE 
Associate Editor 



McCRACKEN SHIVERTS 

Associate Editor Assistant Alumni Editor 



I 8 3 




I 9 3 



T y E BOMB Of 



I N E T E E N T H I I! T y - N I H E 



THE SECRET EIGHT 



"Bomb in the courtyard!" No, it's not an 
air raid, nor a shock troop attack when this 
sharp call echoes through barracks. It is the 
work of the Secret Eight. That cry rep- 
resents months of careful planning, cautious 
buying, and exacting workmanship. A three- 
minute fuse, not more than a pound of powder, 
and a suitable binder all must be obtained, hid- 
den and worked secretly into the finished prod- 
uct. Fireworks manufacturers sometimes oblige 
and meet the specifications. 

The night and the hour and the Sub must 
also be carefully chosen and plans laid to re- 
duce the possibilities of getting caught to a min- 
imum. The Secret Eight unbeknownst to 
the greater part of barracks plans all these 
points, and plans them well, for dismissal is the 
penalty for improperly formulated schemes. 



Founded on traditions though it is, here is one 
upon which the authorities frown. At the turn 
of the century, it became the custom for each 
class to throw a bomb for every year since 1900. 
Each year found it a more difficult task, until 
now when fulfillment of the tradition is nearly 
an impossibility. 

Although usually associated with bomb throw- 
ing, the name Secret Eight is often correlated 
with other irregularities at V. M. I. The ma- 
jority of fireworks are usually thrown by a se- 
lect group well versed in dropping the fire- 
cracker, attached to a cigarette, innocently be- 
hind a post and then continuing along unno- 
ticed. The loss of the sentry box and retaliation 
for depradations on our own school are attrib- 
uted to organizations which are outgrowths of 
the Secret Eight. 




,w, Icl: ,0 r, 
Second Roi, 




Each exam period singles out a group of ca- 
dets and sends them back over the rough roads 
they had hoped to be travehng for the last time. 
Math, physics, chemistry, they all do it! Each 
course selects its individuals; sometimes more 
than one subject places a claim on the individ- 
ual's summer, and there is no alternative but 
the Floating U. 

They are a loyal group, these members of the 
summer school, and many are the unbelievable 
tales of events through the summer. The deeds 
of the brothers in Lexington and vicinity supply 
subject-matter for many autumn bull sessions, 
for the military system does not function in the 
summer, and midnight sallies, sprees, and excur- 
sions are considered conducive to the proper 
frame of mind for study. Amazing stories of 
the capabilities of the brothers along non- 



academic lines lend spice and humor to the 
sessions. 

In spite of all these stories a large percentage 
of the boys are back in barracks with a clean 
slate in the fall. Those who are not, blame it on 
other things, a "chicken" exam, a prejudiced in- 
structor possibly, but never on the life during the 
summer. No, not that, for there are far too 
many who claim that the spirits, good or bad. 
had helped them through. Numerous are the 
stories of men who thought lamp posts were 
integration signs the night before, and yet the 
next morning took the examinations in full stride 
getting grades well above that needed to pass. 
Each set of summer school exams singles out 
its victims, but they are seldom privileged to 
travel the roads again, they must seek the paved 
highways or repeat the year. Those on the 
paved highways often turn envious eyes of those 
fortunate enough to remain at V. M. I. 



THE FLOATING UNIVERSITY 




T U E BOMB Of NINETEEN T H I H T Y - N 1 N E 




DUDLEY P. DIGGES 

Director and Manager 



Under the careful guidance of "Dud" 
Digges, the Commanders had an unusually 
good season with the possible exception of 
one ill-fated trip to Raleigh. Strengthened 
by the veterans of former years, who after 
last year's shake-up had found their places, 



V. M. I. COMMANDERS 



with Cronin at first sax, Digges at trom- 
bone, Hatfield back again to the bull fiddle 
after a year's furlough in the trumpet sec- 
tion, Burnett assuming the duties of first 
trumpet, and with "Sug" Allen, recruited 
from the chemistry stockroom, at the piano, 
"Dud" had a masterful nucleus around 
which to build. Hensley, Jack Johnson, 
and Booker filled out the sax section, Menk 
took care of the second trumpet, Al Carr at 
guitar. Nelson at the drums, and Jimmy 
Bailey supplying the vocals completed a 
well-balanced orchestra. Aside from the 
V. M. I. First Class Hops the Commanders 
play for many of the local schools. 





THE V. M. I. GLEE CLUB 



Under the able guidance of Mrs. M. G. 
Ramey and the sponsorship of Major M. 
G. Ramey, the Glee Club completed its sec- 
ond successful year. Larry Mathews was 
elected President; Bob Smith, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Watt Ellerson, Business Manager, 
and Fred Adams, Secretary. Roy Carter, 
Bob Smith, and Keith Willis were the solo- 
ists. 

The most appreciated program, at least 
to the Corps, was the singing of the Christ- 
mas Carols in the courtyard at Taps the 
night before the Corps left on Christmas 




MRS. M. G. RAMEY 
Director 



furlough. Appreciation for their selections 
was not, however, restricted to \ . M. I., 
for the Glee Club was received enthusias- 
tically throughout the state, singing at 
Richmond. Norfolk, the Apple Blossom 
Festival, and Roanoke. 




THE BOMB OF N I N E T E E H T H I U T Y - N I M E 



THE LECTERN 

W. H. McCarthy 
President 

H. L. Wehrle 
ricc-Presidenl 

D. C. DOMISICK 
Secretary- Treasurer 




AMERICAN SOCIETY 

OF 

CIVIL ENGINEERS 

A. M. Turner 
President 

A. R. Flinn 

Vice-President 

F. F. Flowers 
Secretary 



THE HEALTHf .'L AMD PUASAMT ABODE Of A CP.OWD OF HONORABLE 
YOVTHS PP^:SIHG VPTHE HIU OF SCIENCE WITH NOBU EMVUTION 
A OP^TIFYING SPECTACLE AM HONOR TO OVR. COVNTMAND OVR. 
STATE OB.JECTS OF HONEST PRIDE TO THEIR INSTRVCTOfLS AND FAIR. 
SPECIMENS Of CITIZEN SOLDIERS ATTACHED TOTHEIR NATIVE STATE 
PROVD OF HER FAME AND REA.DY IN EVERY TIME OF DEEPEST PERIL 

r'HaPRsaEFE'iD 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE 

OF 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 

P. B. Baldutn- 
Pres'uient 

F. M. Parker 

Vice-President 

D. F. Flowers 
Secretary 




THE HEALTH FVL AND fL£ASANT ABODE OF A CK-O'^CD OF HONORABU 
YOVTHS PMSilNC VF THE HILL OF SCIENCE: WITH NOBLE EMVUTION 
A GRATIFYING SPECTACLE AN HONOR. TO OVB. COVNTKY AND OVB. 
STATE OBJECTS OF HONEST PP.IDE TO THEIR. INSTIC/CTORS AND FAIR 
SPECIMENS Of ClTIZEt! SOLDIERS ATTACHED TO THEIR NATIVE ST.\TE 
PROVD OF HER FAME AND READY IN EVERY TIME OF DEEPEST PERIL 



V. M. I. Chapter 

VIRGINIA ACADEMY 

OF 

SCIENCE 




THE TEXAS CLUB 



"Let's have an 'Old Yell' for Texas," and 
another meeting of the Texas Club has come to 
an end. And those hardy Texans can really 
give a lusty "Old Yell" for their native state. 

Texas has a better representation in barracks 
than any other state. In numbers it is exceeded 
only by New York and Virginia. In activity it 
is surpassed by none, for the Texas Club is the 
most active club in barracks. Every now and 
tlitn it is turned out in the mess hall that "the 
Texas Club will meet in room 125 immediately 
after supper." Later on in the evening the ter- 
mination of the meeting is announced by an 
"Old Yell" for Texas just outside of 125. 
What goes on at these meetings only the Texans 
know, for it is an exclusive club whose member- 
ship is composed only of natives of Texas. We 
do know that they have occasional get-togethers 
with Texas girls from neighboring schools. We 
know too that they have banquets from time to 
time. 



The pride and patriotism that the Texans 
have for their state is admired by cadets from 
all other states. Bill Bond, the leader of this 
stalwart group, is the personification of all these 
characteristics. He is completely sold on Texas; 
as a matter of fact, he has made the Corps very 
Texas conscious, not only through the mediae 
of casual conversation and public speaking class, 
but with his amazing exhibitions of roping. He 
may be seen on almost any rainy day with a 
cigar in his teeth and swinging his lariat as 
it should be swung. 

Withal, the boys from Texas are not dom- 
ineering with their enthusiasm for the Lone Star 
State; they are merely proud of their heritage, 
and we admire them for it. We know, too, 
that if the citizens of every state were charac- 
terized by the enthusiasm and the patriotism of 
the Texans, our country would be a better place 
in which to live. 




8 3 




aKv__ 



THE BOMB Of h I N [ T E [ N T H I D T V - N I N E 



THE YANKEE CLUB 



As the largest sectional organization at V. 
M. I. the Yankee Club has always set the pace 
for other similar clubs. At the first meeting 
of this year the club's officers were elected. As 
president New Yorker Jack Littrell ably ful- 
filled the duties of his position and did a great 
deal to further the interests of the club. The 
organization's other officers were filled by Clint 
Dominick, vice-president, and Don Buonano, 
secretary and treasurer. 

It has always been the custom of the Yankee 
Club to hold an annual banquet during the 
spring of each year. A very wise change was 
inaugurated this year in that these banquets 
were held with greater frequency, one being 
planned for the week-end of each major set of 
hops. This innovation created within the club 
a greater feeling of brotherhood, and served to 
acquaint current members with many visiting 
alumni. On several occasions distinguished 



members of the faculty were guests of honor. 
The success of these affairs was largely due to 
the efforts of the secretary; 

Some of the most important and most fre- 
quent meetings of the Yankees were spontaneous 
and informal. From reveille to taps, and even 
far into the night on many occasions, little 
groups of two or three Yankees could be heard 
asserting the supremacy of the North over the 
South or extolling the beauties of the North to 
large audiences of attentive, if somewhat skep- 
tical, "Rebs." 

In spite of the vehemence with which the 
Yankees assert their superiority over their 
southern neighbors, they admit in New York 
and in Virginia that they have found the South 
the home of cordial people who welcomed them 
to a fine state, a fine school, and fine gentlemen 
with whom to associate as fellow cadets and as 
Brother Rats. 



THEHEALTHFVL AND PLEASANT ABODE OF A- CRO'*'D OF HONORABLE 
YOVTHSPRESSING VP THE- HILL OFSCiENCEWTH NOBLE EMVLATION 
A GRATIFYING SPECTACLE AN HONOR TO OVR.COVNTKY AND OVR 
STATE OBJECTS OF HONEST PRJDE TO THEIR- INSTRVCTORS- AND FAIR 
SPECIMENS OF CITIZEN SOLDIERS : ATTACHED TO THEIR NATIVE STATE 
PROVD OF KER-FAME AND READY- IN -EVERY TIME OF DEEPEST- PERIL 





S ( I A L 



3 9 






■^Pi 



9 3 9 



THE BOMB Of NINETEEN T H i D T Y - N I N E 





W. A. IRVING 

Leader of the Final Ge 




T. W. GRAY 

Assistant Leader of the Final Ge 



THE FINAL 
GERMAN 

On the Monday night of Finals the First 
Classman appears in a dance figure for the 
final time, the last of three figures, all of 
which have symbolized for him a momen- 
tous occasion in his cadetship. Ring Figure 
is the culmination of two and half years of 
patient waiting for the ceremony that will 
bind him irrevocably to his Brother Rats, 
then comes the figure of the Final Ball at 
the end of his Second Class year, the begin- 
ning of the duties and privileges of the First 
Class, and finally the Final German, the 
glorious end of four years as a V. M. I. 
cadet. 

It is with mixed feelings that the First 
Classman walks down the long polished 
floor of Cocke Memorial Hall for the last 
time. Ahead of him is the diploma for 
which he has worked for four years. Finals 
has taken on for him a new significance, he 
knows now the true meaning of the word, 
for never again will he and his Brother Rats 
participate in anything as a unit. Never- 
theless, with but one more day as a cadet 
ahead of him, comes the realization that 
those four years, though past, will never 
cease to affect him. The hardships that he 
has endured, the pleasures that he has en- 
joyed have changed him and have bound 
him with men whom he has never seen, but 
men to whom he can turn anywhere in the 
world. The Final German is more than a 
figure and a dance to the graduating First 
Classman. 



THE MONOGRAM 
HOP 

To the athletes who spend the long after- 
noons on the football field, the cross coun- 
try course, on the baseball field, on the ten- 
nis court, in the swimming pool, or m the 
gym, V. M. I. gives the monogram, the red, 
white, and yellow letters which signify not 
only achievement but also the long, hard, 
struggle that precedes the blocked kick or 
the dash that lasts but a fraction of a min- 
ute. As an added gesture to the men who 
have proven themselves in sport, the first 
dance of Finals is dedicated to the Mono- 
gram Club, and is known as the Monogram 
Hop. 

The figure which opens the dance is led 
by the President and Vice-President of the 
Monogram Club. The members wear the 
white monogram sweaters, the motif is fur- 
ther carried out by the red, white, and yel- 
low corsages of the girls in the figure, and 
by the decorations in the same colors. 

The figure this year was led by President 
Dick Strickler and Vice-President Paul 
Shu, both three-letter men, and behind them 
came the men who had contributed to V. 
M. I.'s success in all departments of inter- 
collegiate sport. The short but effective fig- 
ure ended, and onto the floor swarmed the 
cadets, alumni, parents, and friends for the 
first of the dances of the Centennial Finals, 
the 1939 Monogram Hop! 




R. D. STRICKLER 

Leader of the Monogram Figu 




n^k^ 



p. C. SHU 
Assistant Leader of the Monogram F!gd 



3 9 




9 3 9 



T N E BO 



OF NINETEEN T H I D T Y = N I N E 



THE RING FIGURE 
AND THE FINAL BALL 



The traditional Thanksgiving day game with 
V. P. I. is over, the Corps has returned, and 
for the second classman comes the long-awaited 
Ring Figure. None but a cadet can know the 
anxious anticipation and the final thrill of ac- 
tually receiving the ring — and the kiss. 

Wearing mess jackets for the first time in 
their cadetship, the second class dances smoothly 
through the long figure which represents weeks 
of painstaking practice. The figure comes to an 
end, and the couples separate to go through 
the arches where the cadet finally has the ring 
slipped onto his finger. 

For the last dance of finals the Second Class 
again dons mess jackets and gives the Final Ball 
in honor of the graduating class. Again they 
tread the intricate steps of a figure, and, as the 




dance begins, they realize that they have now 
assumed the responsibilities for which they have 
spent three years preparing. 




f AVO MTES 

AS STATED IN THE FOREWORD, THE PURPOSE OF 
THIS VOLUME IS TO PRESERVE IN PICTURE AND IN 
PRINT THOSE PHASES OF OUR CADET LIFE WHICH 
WILL STAND OUT IN OUR MEMORIES ABOVE ALL 
THE REST. SURELY THE MEMORY OF CERTAIN 
GIRLS WHO HAVE CONSISTENTLY APPEARED ON 
THE POST AT HOP TIME WILL REMAIN WITH US. 
WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE THE FOLLOWING GIRLS, 
CHOSEN FROM A GROUP OF PHOTOGRAPHS SUB- 
MITTED BY MEMBERS OF THE CORPS, KNOWN AS 
V. M. I. FAVORITES. 






MISS MAY GARDNER SMITH 



MISS JOYCE ALBRIGHT 





MISS CLARA CALL 



MISS ELINOR WILSON 





MISS BETTY WEST 



MISS STUART HENSLEY 





MISS JANE GOOLRICK 



MISS ELAINE ELLIS 





MISS SHIRLEY DAIGER 



MISS DOROTHEA ROUNTREE 





MISS MARY COBB HAYWARD 



MISS MARY LOU SHANNON 



!»»•»: 3»a»v - 





<^Q^ 



ifllHk ■ 



MISS DORIS SWAIN 



MISS BEHY BRAND 





MISS SHIRLEY NALLEY 



MISS VIRGINIA LEE HOOKEi; 



INDEX 



To serve as a directory to the friends and patrons of the Virginia MiUtary Institute's Corps of Cadets 

who have made the 1939 Bomb possible. 



Xam,- fage 

Adair Hutton, Inc ?-92 

Albemarle Paper Co 314 

American Colloid Corp ^ 311 

Andre Studios 307 

A. & N. Trading Co 275 

Atlantic Hotel 314 

Augusta Fruit Co 289 

Belmont Shoe Repair 275 

Blue Buckle Overall Co 268 

Benson Printing Co 318 

Boley's Book Store 310 

Boyd's Taxi 316 

Bova, C. C. & Co 280 

Brown's Cleaning Works 289 

Boxley, W. W. 293 

Buckingham and Flippin 295 

Burford, W. A. and Co 311 

Caldwell Sites Co 305 

Charlottesville Woolen Mills 288 

City Cab Co 269 

Colt Cromwell Boot Co 301 

Conner Produce Co. 268 

Daniel Hays Co. 278 

Deaver Clothing Co 310 

Dutch Inn 282 

Evans, D. & Co., Inc 303 

Ezekiel & Weilman Co 313 

Fallon Florist 280 

First National Bank of Lynchburg 283 

Fleet, C. B., & Co 276 

Flowers School Equipment Co 269 

Franklin's Inc. 276 

Frazer Paint Co. 309 

Freeman & Morse 300 

Friddle's Restaurant 308 

Gazette Publishing Co 313 

Hamric & Smith 293 

Handy, N. B 287 

Herff-Jones Co 266 

Hess, Jewelers 312 

Hecker Products 276 

Heironimus, S. H., & Co 282 

Higgins & Irvine 287 

Huger Davidson Sale Co. 269 

Julius Simon Corp 281 

Kemp, Hal 316 

Kingskraft Covers 308 

Leader Publishing Co 287 

Lichford, L. E 268 

Little Oil Co. 263 

Luray Caverns Corp 315 

Lynchburg Engraving Co 317 

Lynchburg Steam Bakery 276 

Ma Finberg's 275 



Name Page 

Mayflower Hotel 303 

McConnell, Albert B. 271 

McCoy, Grocers 274 

McCrum Drug Co 294 

Meyer, N. S., Inc 281 

Mildred Miller's 290 

Miller Manufacturing Co 267 

Millner's 264 

Montag Bros 311 

Montgomery Transfer 276 

Myers Hardware 263 

Nelson Hardware Co 264 

Noland Co., Inc 274 

Norman, John 271 

Osborne, Will 291 

Palace Cleaners 310 

Pender Grocery 298 

People's National Bank of Lexington 315 

People's National Bank of Lynchburg 270 

Pete's Taxi 300 

Philadelphia Uniform Co 309 

Post Exchange 297 

Phillips Bros., Inc 312 

Rapp Motor Co. 282 

Rice's Drug Store 313 

Rice, A. H., & Co 314 

Ridabock & Co 298 

Roanoke, Hotel 291 

Robert E. Lee Hotel 316 

Roberts & Hagan, Inc 314 

Rockbridge National Bank 302 

Rockbridge County News 299 

Rockbridge Motor Co., Inc. 269 

Rockbridge Steam Laundry 274 

Shenandoah Tailoring Co. 306 

Silver, Arthur 280 

Sitterding, Carneal & Davis 282 

Smokeless Fuel Co. 296 

Southern Barber Supply Co 313 

Southern Inn 310 

State Theatre 265 

Stonewall Jackson Hotel 300 

Strother Drug Co. 268 

Sunnyside Dairy 304 

Taylor, E. E., Corp. 286 

Thomas, Frank, Co. , 273 

Tolley's Hardware 287 

Tolley's Toggery 290 

University Cleaners 292 

Virginia Cafe 305 

Warner Brothers 277 

Walter's Fruit Co 267 

Western Auto Store . 282 

Witt, Geo. D., Shoe Co 283 

Woodward & Bowling , 282 



THE 



1939 



OUTRAGE 




BROTHER RAX SO&LOW 




1 



EDITOR 



SONNY CARTER, cartdo.ist 
CARTER BU RGESS, ADVERTISING manager 




On Borrowed Time 



STOP ME IF YOU'VE HEARD 
THIS ONE DEPARTMENT 

"Rappaccini's Daughter" — the scientist's 
daughter who died of an anecdote given her 

by her lover. 

— Rat Theme 



COMPLIf/IEflT': 
OF . 

THE LITTLE OIL 
COMPANY 



RICHMOND, VIRGItllA 



HARDWARE 

SINCE 1865 

SPORTING GOODS 
COLT REVOLVERS 
GUNS AND RIFLES 



REMINGTON 

KLEAN BORE 

AMMUNITION 

MYERS HARDWARE CO. 

Incorporaled 
LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



NELSON HARDWARE COMPANY 



51 YEARS 



1939 



DISTRIBUTORS 
Football, Baseball, Golf, Tennis, Track, Ping Pong, Badnnin+on, Soft Ball, Basketball 

Equipment by the Leading American Manufacturers 

GOLDSMITH » RAWLINGS • KROYDON • DUNLOP 

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 



Christmas Party Held 
By Shady Grove Club 



Wait Causes Slump 
In Marriage Trade 




CERTIFIED 
NEWSPAPER 
CLIPPINGS 





Colored Quartet Sing« 
On Assembly Progrram 

Frank Parker and his quartet of 
colored singers made a decided hit 
at the Assembly on Tuesdaj'. In ad- 
dition to Parker, the singers were- 



'i~«»0 







YOU KNOW IT'S CORRECT 



IF IT COMES FROM 




ILLNEM 



THE SHOPPING CENTRE 




MEN'S SHOP 



LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



It happened a couple of summers ago at Fort Myer. 
The next man in Une for the physical examination was 
Jay Vaughan. The eye doctor grabbed him and threw him 
into a chair. "Sit down there and read me the last lin; 
on that chart up there on the wall." Jay Vaughan re- 
adjusted his specs. But a puzzled expression immediately 
possessed his puss. Turning to the doctor with a face 
full of frowns, he inquired, "What wall?" 



There used to be a girl over at The Terrace whom they 
called "Checkers" because she jumped every time her 
date made a wrong move. 



First Sgt.: "That shirt of yours is torn ail to pieces. I 
thought you told me the other day you were going to buy 
a new one." 

Cy Fraser: "I am. But it's getting so close to finals 
that I thought I'd wait until the next time the Q. M. D. 
has a 'one-cent sale'." 



Brother: "Have you seen Charlotte's new evening 
gown?" 

Rat: "No. What does it look like?" 

Brother: "Well, in most places it looks a lot like Char- 
lotte." 



WARNER BROS. 

STATE 

AND 

LYRIC 

THEATRES 



RALPH DAVES 

Manager 



LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



Liberal Artist: "Who knocked on my door just now?" 
Civil Man: "It was me." 

L. A. (to L. A. roommate) : "What do you suppose 
that fellow is trying to say?" 



to say, "Is it raining outside?" "I don't know." replied 
the other, whose hay was right near the window. 

"Well, get up and look," said the first whose hav was 
right near the door. 

"Aw hell," said the persecuted one. "Call a rat in and 
see if he's got on a rain cape." 

"Got something in your eye?" 

"No, I'm just trying to look through my finger." 

. With all respect to the bovs in \XashingTon we tell the 

one about the WPA worker who hated holidays. He 
Two super-certified Liberal Artists were lying in the said it made him feel common when there wasn't any- 
hay one afternoon. One finally mustered enough energy body working. 



Herff-Jones Company 

JEWELERS. STATIONERS. AND 
MEDALISTS 



Designers of Original and Exclusive 
College Jewelry 



OFFICIAL JEWELERS FOR THE CLASS 
OF 

1939 



INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



JAMES L. DECK, Virginia Representative 
3210 Grove Avenue Richmond, Virginia 



HOW TO MAKE A TOM COLLINS DURING 
7:30 CCQ 

(From the f/iiiio/is laijus of ,/. (Ihiitiniis) 

On last beat of drum take tin dipper from end of glass 
shelf rack. Put dipper on rear table and get bottle of 
gin from laundry bag. Fill dipper )4 fu" g'"- Add 4 or 
5 drops of lemon juice. Carefully shake dipper to mix 
contents thoroughly. If first drink is too sour, add more 
gin to second. Serves one. 



I wish I had a likker locker 
To lock some likker in. 
I wish I had a lotter likker 
To place therein, 
Because I am a likker liker, 
Fond of Scotch and gin. 
I wish I had a likker locker 
For me and my frin. 

— Ralph Waldo Loxgfellow 



Much sharper than the razor 

Which has recently been honed, 

Were the words I uttered Sunday 

When the man said, "You're boned." 



WALTERS 

FRUIT AND PRODUCE 

COMPANY 

GROCERIES 
CANDIES AND TOBACCO 



STAUNTON, VIRGINIA 




J. Clifford Miller, Jr. 
'28 



Lewi; N. Miller 
•32 



"To study relaxed is lo study to learn" 
Was spoken by men wtio had brains to bur 
"To study relaxed," we Keydets say, 
"Is flat on our backs in a Miller Hav!" 



MILLER MANUFACTURING CO.. Inc. 



LUMBER 



RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 
WOODEN BOXES 



M ILL WO RK 



V. L. CONNER, Proprietor 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF PHONES 183—184 

CONNER PRODUCE COMPANY 

FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

DISTRIBUTORS OF THE CHOW ORANGES 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

THE BLUE BUCKLE 
OVERALL CO. 



LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



Indigestion and Constipation 
are closely allied. Conquerlne 
Is good for colds. At your 
druggist In 3 sizes. Give It 
a trial and If you don't feel 
better, get your money back. 

CONQUERINE 



STROTHER DRUG CO. 



Lynchburg, Virginia 



COMPLIMENTS AND BEST 


WISHES 






FROM 




L. 


E. 


LICHFORD 






Distributor of 




FAIRFAX 


HALL PURE FOOD 


PRODUCTS 






Lynchburg, Virginia 





FLOWERS 
SCHOOL EQUIPMENT CO. 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



QUALITY SCHOOL FURNITURE 



"Where'd you get the black eye?" 

"In the war." 

"What war?" 

"The Boude War, dope." 



Remember the fate of Steve McWhizz. 
He played with a wife that wasn't his. 



As Chester Goolrick used to say, V. M. I. rings have 
everything on them but a plate of growley. 



It was Sunday at The Arp. The preacher, after a 
long exhortation demanded of the congregation that all 
who desired to go to heaven should stand up. All arose 
except one keydet, who was a lieutenant in "B" Company. 

"What!" cried the preacher, "Don't you want to go 
to heaven?" 

"Not now," said the Striped Wonder. "I've got a 
Military Science test tomorrow." 



CITY CAB SERVICE 


LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 


138 


H 
O 
N 


138 




Day and Night 


ALL LOADS INSURED 


Radio and Heater Equipped 



ROCKBRIDGE 
MOTOR CO. 



Incorporated 



GARAGE 



DODGE PLYMOUTH 

CARS 



PHONE 289 



THE 

HUGER-DAVIDSON 
SALE CO. 

Incorporated 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 

AND 

STAUNTON, VIRGINIA 



The Home of 

PLEE-ZING QUALITY FOOD 
PRODUCTS 




Passing in Review 



THE PEOPLES 


NATIONAL BANK 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 
Member of 


OF 


LYNCHBURG 




THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 






and 






THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



New 
Location 

• 
Over 
Park 

Theatre 




TAILORED SUITS 
FURrJISHINGS 



ROArJOKE, VIRGINIA 



ALBERT B. McCONNELL 



<SMilitary T)ucks 

English broadcloths 

Shirtings 



140 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK 



IS THERE NO JUSTICE? 

The Lindbergh kidnapping law provides that anyone 
who is kidnapped and taken across state lines will be pun- 
ished by life imprisonment. 

— Rat Theme. 



S. M. I. A. SCENE 

Tactical Officer: "\X'hv don't vou get a new pair of 
shoes?" 

First Class Pvt.: "I can't find a Second Classman mv 
size to go in with me on them, sir."' 



~, ■• 1 . , , , , , t I r rr ■ 1 ai Father: W ell, son, now that vou have been OTaduated 

1 he little girl had tossed and tumbled all nisht. About r lt- -i i' rT-.iir. 

, , 1 , ■ I 1 1 1 II 1 I ^'^°"^ ^'^^ Institute with a degree of Bachelor of .Arts, 

three o clock in the morning she awoke and called to her i . i r l r o- 

° .,1111 what are vour plans tor the iuture.'^ 

mother. Please tell me a story, Mom," she pleaded. -p,. . ,„. , . , . 

1 hirtv-niner: 1 m going to take slx months time out 

"Hush, darling," said her mother, "Daddy (Class of and read m\ textbooks so^ I can get rid of this guilt\- 

'14) will be in soon and he'll tell us both one." conscience I've had for the past two vears." 




The Judg-e Almanac 

September 

By Marc Connelly and George S. Kaufman 




John l%eUjr 



3rd. — . 



+th.— : 



5th.- 



7th.- 



9th.- 



Fifth session of summer coaching school closes at Rockbridge 
Baths, 1846. Roll as follows: Beale, Camp, Carpenter, 
Diuguid, Harkrader, Lord, Lyons, Ra«is, Shellhorse, Wil- 
liams and Ginsburg. Growley invented by mountaineers in 
the vicinity of Khyber Pass, 1847. 

-Oriental named Yee deported as international spy, 1890. 
Jack Tyler puts on pair of shoes for first time, Roxobelle, 
N. C, 1935. Figures he'll have to learn anyhow when he 
goes off to school. 

Little Fish Herring toddles from dining room to kitchen in 
record time. Little Billy Haislip does the same at Salem, 
Va., 1918. Time: 2 hrs. 30 mins. Jim Patterson gets to 
BRC on time, 1935. Guy Mitchell gets caught running the 
block for the tenth time, 1936. 

■Zeke Smithers and his Montevideo String Band signed for 
Openings by 1939 Hop Committee which is promising a 
year of spectacular dance orchestras, 1938. Eastside Bar- 
bary Coast established. Super-private Fraser made Emir. 
Baldwin convicted as spy, 1938. 

Jet Oil sold for the first time at the Institute, 1852. One 
Robertson makes initial purchase of two dozen bottles. 
"Trombone Smear" played at Guard Mount, 1854. Un- 
known maladv kills thousands in vicinity of Khvber Pass, 
1857. 

Blandy Clarkson reduced to grade of private for failing to 
walk penalty tourists at 2:00 A. M., 191 3. First Saturday 
afternoon without rain in three years, 1927. Automatic shoe 
shiner installed in the Post Exchange, 1935. 
First handmade toupee purchased by native of Petersburg, 
1812. Second Class goes on pledge for one Mallory, 1891. 
Snag Meem accepts blind date for hops and proceeds to 
dance for three hours with certified wallflower, 1935. 
Loses all faith in term "brother rat." 

An O. D. named Tidwell bones seventy-five First Clasr. 
Privates for shoes imp. shined, 3rd. C. P., 1900. A girl 
named Lancaster accepts invitation to be in Ring Figure, 
1929. Has been doing same ever since. 

Baby with unusually gruff voice born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Hubert in Alabama. Christened "Pooley" because of 
limped eyes, 1902. Entire rear rank of "F" Company 
sent to company room by McEveety, 1935. 
Davis Mayo maxs Calculus examination, 1904. When asked 
if he will sub at the Institute next year replies, "Nay, Per- 
line." George White forgets to shine shoes, 2nd C. P., 
1938. Certifies he thinks he's slowly becoming one of the 
grossest men in barracks. 

Group of starving soldiers in a shell hole in France get 
reprimanded for dropping morale during gas attack, 1918. 
One Burress is commanding officer . Messick discovers 
snappy retort, "okey doke," 1934. 

Hits in the Post Exchange 1930-1935; Anything Goes, 
Double Trouble, Vve Got a Feeling You're Fooling, Ha- 
Cha-Cha, Let 'i'ourself Go, Forty-Second Street, After Sun- 
down, About a Quarter to Nine, Lady in Red, When I 
Grow Too Old to Dream, You're Gonna Lose Your Gal. 




13th. — Picture show in J-M Hall tonight, "The Great Train Rob- 
bery," 1905. Jim Farley manages to get through parade 
without help from Pasco, 1936. D\idley Digges remembers 
to keep appointment, 1938. 



14th. — Young Hubert utters first invective when fellow- playmate 
fails to intercept rock thrown by rival gang, 1904. Witt 
disco^'ers theory of relativitv, 1920. 

15th. — Locks Saunders shot at Red Gulch for holding five aces, 
1865. Sweet Briar College founded by two rats looking for 
week-end entertainment, 1901. The General Committee 
and Fred Adams hold another meeting, 1935. 

1 6th. — One Millner quits job in loan office. Learns that a ten- 
cent grammar is for sale in a Paris bargain basement and 
goes abroad to make purchase, 1920. Bill Irving returns 
from Sweet Briar with no lipstick on face due to measles 
epidemic in said institution, 1937. 




(Revised and brought up 



by the 



17th. — "Ma" Finburg's business drops off 80 per cent as First 

Class goes on pledge, 1938. Cam Budd, in charge of 

platoon at Parade, forgets to give commands. Two squads 

drown in the Nile, 1938. 
i8th. — One Tinsley dismissed for selling Jackson Memorial Hall 

to member of Fourth Class, i860. Post Band plays "Blue 

Moon" at SEI for last time, 1936. 
19th. — Blitz cloth invented in Alabama by one Barnes, 1856. 

Woosie Cox forgets to expand chest in showers, 1936. 

Feddeman gets In the game again, 1937. 
20th. — Harry Digges, manager of Monte Carlo-Sinks Casino, tells 

newlyweds that it is definitely possible to live on love. 

Says he's been doing it for four years, 1903. 
2 1 St. — Piltdown Strickler reports his own brother for spot on 

leopard skin, 6000 B.C. Frazier and Seaton discontinue 

sandwich sales temporarily, 1889. Sick list decreases 50%. 
22nd. — Hank Cronin gives class ring to Nova Scotian beauty queen 

in exchange for gold basketball, 1936. Due to his inability 

to pawn the latter, gifts are re-exchanged, 1937. Cronin 

proposes, is accepted. Unable to marry because he can't 

borrow the minister's fee, 1938. 
23rd. — Ginsburg boned for hayroll at Parade, 1935. Woosie Cox 

forgets to expand chest in showers, 1938. 
24th. — Slop Sclater visits rat barracks with brand new punch 

board size of card-table top, 1936. Hudgins receives fan 

letter from his sister following his broadcast with Priscilla 

Lane, 1938. 
25th. — \'al Parham admits he's wrong in an argument, 1937. 

Ray Taylor sinks goal in basketball game, 1938. 
26th. — New drummer named Wray goes to Parade for first time, 

191 1. Says, "Never again 1" Booker takes position as 

\'easey's valet, 1936. 
27th. — Wakie Townes announces at SRC that there is no row like 

Arrow, 1936. Then gives, 'Colume of squads, rear platoon, 

squads left." 
28th. — One Holland appointed Regimental Adjutant, 1875. Bugler 

plays "The Music Goes 'Round and Around" for March, 

1936. 
29th. — W. R. Hills loses shako. Is excused from Parade, 1935. 

Occupants of Room 140 boned for creating gross disturbance 

in barracks, 1938. 
30th. — "The Blue Bird of Happiness" played by Irving Sharp for 

145th time, 1937. Jones gets another six in Public Speaking 

for addressing the Senate on the downfall of democracy', 

1938. 

of The Outrjge through courtesy of The Judge.) 



IX. 




Frank Thomas Company extends Felicitations to 

the Virginia Military Institute on the occasion of 

its One Hundredth Anniversary. 



FRANK THOMAS COMPANY 




Makers of the 



ITE FaL1¥©T 



and White 



Jacket 



For First and Second Classmen 



V.M.I. 



Officers Uniforyyis 



Insignia 



Equipment 



Frank Thomas Co. 



INC. 



Cp NORFOLK 



• • • 



VIRGINIA 



PALETOTS • MESS JACKETS 
TUX SHIRTS 

Zoric Dry Cleaners 



'IT'S ODORLESS' 



ROCKBRIDGE STEAM LAUNDRY 



Incorporated 
PHONE 185 



M.S. McCOY 



LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



MEATS, GROCERIES 
PROVISIONS 



OLD VIRGINIA CURED HAMS A 
SPECIALTY 



NOLAND COMPANY 

Incorporated 



V/HOLESALE 

PLUMBING, HEATING AND 
MILL SUPPLIES 



DIAL 5561 



ROANOKE, VA. 



Brother Rats!! 


WE'LL MEET YOU 


AT 


MA FINBERG'S 


"Everything to Eat and Drink" 


15 So. Jefferson Sf. Lexington, Virginia 


"MOTHER-RAT OF '39" 



ODE TO A BOTTLE 

'Tis an ode to a bottle 

That I'm going to write for you. 

A few drops of happiness, 

That taste Hke morning dew. 

Now girls, you know, are fickle, 

And changing like the wind. 

But who ever had that trouble 

With a pint or so of gin? 

A girl will say she loves you 

With vows to Heaven above, 

But vows are soon forgotten, 

And forgotten, too, the love. 

The bottle doesn't fill you 

In such unfaithful vein. 

But fills you much more truthfully 

With happiness that knows no pain. 

Yet women are so beautiful, 

So innocent, so sweet, so pure. 

Horsefeathers, says the one who's writing this. 

And you'll agree, I'm sure. 

Now what could be so beautiful, 

As sweet, as pure, as nice, 

As a great big clinking highball 

Made of Seagram's Five and ice? 

And who ever saw a bottle 

Late-dating a Mink at dawn? 

So you may take the lady, sir. 

But, by Gawd, give me the corn! 

— Crawfish 



THE MILITAP ( DEPARTMENT 

OF THE 

A. &N. TRADING CO. 

SALUTES 

V.M.I. 

OtI ITS 
HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY 



LUCK GOLDBERG 

8th and D Streets, N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

'CORRECT MILITARY OUTFITTERS 



Compliments of 

A LYNCHBURG FRIEND 



SHOES RESOLED? 
SHOES REPAIRED? 



SEE 



BELMONT SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

A. WHITE, Proprietor 



A SALUTE to V M. I 

ON YOUR 100th anniversary 

FROM 

BIXBY JET-OIL 

The World's Fastest Shine 

It is an Konor to know that Bixby Jet-Oil 
has the endorsement of many 
present cadets as well as those 
who have graduated berore 
you. 





A THOUGHT FOR THE DAY 

Aristophanes of Cappadocia, in his autobiography, 
makes the noteworthy comment that "when I was a rat I 
used to think the Institute was going to hell, but after 
staying there four years I find that it was I who had gone 
to hell. Selah." 



AH, THE FUTILITY OF 
IT ALL! 

"Shine that shako?" 

"No, sir." 

"Shave?" 

"No, sir." 

"Those clean belts?" 

"No, sir." 

"Shine that brass?" 

"No, sir." 

"Those clean gloves?" 

"No, sir." 

"Brush those stripes off?" 

"No, sir." 

"Shine those shoes?" 

"No, sir." 

"Clean this bore?" 

"No, sir." 

"Shine those frogs?" 

"No, sir. I couldn't find 
the — " 

"Also report this man for 
room in gross disorder." 



GENUINE OLD VIRGINIA FRUIT 
CAKE 

m ATTRACTIVE COLONIAL BOXES 
3-lb. and 5-lb. Sizes 

Delivered Anywhere in U. S. A. the Year 

Around $1.00 per Pound 

Foreign Countries — Add Extra Express Charge 

LYNCHBURG STEAM BAKERY 

Incorporated 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



COMPLIMENTS 



C. B. FLEET CO. 

incorporated 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

W. D. MONTGOMERY 
TRANSFER 

Daily Freight Service from 

Lynchburg, Va., to Covington, Va., via 
Lexington, Buena Vista, and 
Clifton Forge 



' 


COMPLIMENTS 






OF 


s. 


H. 


FRANKLIN 

Incorporated 




LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



SALUTE TO POTHER RAT 



77 




Warner Bros, take this occasion to express grateful appreciation to the Virginia 
Military Institute for invaluable aid rendered in the filming of "Brother Rat". 
([In behalf of the stars, Priscilla Lane and Wayne Morris, of the supporting 
cast, and of the millions who have gloriously enjoyed the picture — thanks 
for a happy experience and best wishes for V. M. I.'s second hundred years! 







REGULATION 

At West Point and Virginia Military Institute 



GLOVES SINCE 1854 



DANIEL HAYS COMPANY 



-■:S-:<fc:""'^:4 ■ '^^B 


li 










§M:0^^^ 


: ■^:?;-r;;:;:- ^^ ff ^^S'^^ ■ ■':'*iill 


;,i,:::^^^^^b-';^% ''Wf#y; 


:.,^^^j|^:.« 





SLOVERSVILLE 



^>^''^a:j?^^'tJV 



^?^.:;--0<" 






g;,<ii^A!A.aj | 




THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



Notes and (Uiiiiiiunts 

THE Virginia Military Institute 
down in Lexington is celebrating 
its hundredth anniversary this year. 
The centennial theme is being carried 
out in its annual, especially in the 
humor section, where all the jokes are 
a hundred years old. 

RAY TA\'LOR, representative of 
a local clothing establishment, 
just thrills all over when he hears the 
barracks boys singing that rhythm 
number of last winter, "I Owe Sil- 
ver." 

A MISERABLE tramp once 
stopped at the foot of the 
Chemistry Building steps and held 
out an emaciated hand to the uni- 
formed figure descending. "I ha\e 
had nothing to eat for a week," he 
said. "I am so worn out I can hardly 
stand up. Won't you please help me 
out? Just a dime. A mere dime for 
doughnuts and coffee." 

"Sir," replied he to whom this 
touching appeal was addressed, "I am 
Butch Ritchie and I shall never give 
a man ten." 

A CARLOAD of barracks boys 
were riding along the road from 
Laurel to Meade late one night last 
summer when they almost ran into a 
large car parked on the side of the 
road with all its lights out. Thinking 
that they really should stop and find 
out if the driver was in trouble, they 
pulled up beside the car. A boy stuck 
his head out the window and they 
were surprised to see that it was one ' 
of the Valley Forge fellows. The\ 
asked him if he was out of gas. He 
said he wasn't "Battery shot?" they 
inquired. "Nope," he replied. 
"Carburetor clogged?" 



"Heck no." 

"Fan belt broken ?" 

"No. Just bought a new one yes- 
terday." 

"Tire down ?" 

"No, this is 1939." So the key- 
dets drove on off and left him there 
by the side of the road. 

A LADY went in Boley's a couple 
of weeks ago and asked for 
something light to read. One of th; 
clerks searched the tables for a few 
minutes and then held up a book by 
Agassiz. "Here's something about 
the cardinal," she said. To which 
the lady replied, "I'm not interested 
in religior 

"But this one's a bird. " 

"I'm not interested in his private 
life either," she said, and finally 
bought one of last year's best sellers, 
"How to Make Friends and Other 
People." 




FOilK years ago there was a rat at 
the Institute taking history under 

Major M . His daily average 

was sort of low, so he decided to prac- 
tice a little boot licking right up to 
the day of the mid-term examination. 
The history exam was on a Monday. 
so the new cadet figured he might as 
well go to church that Sunday, which 
as you know, is optional, and get in 
that last minute lick. Showing up at 
the church a few seconds late, he saw 
the professor, in civilian clothes, and 
his wife sitting a few seats in front 
of his, which meant that he would 
have to make himself evident after 
the service when everyone was leaving 
the church. The sermon had no ef- 
fect on him. He was planning what 
he should say to the professor. 

Immediately after the benediction 
was sung he rushed to the vestibule 
in order to get plenty of room to 
prostrate himself, figuratively, and 
touch the hem of the sacred garment 
when the great man passed that way. 
The professor's wife came first and 
at her exit the new cadet smiled, 
bowed, scraped, spoke words dripping 
syrup and was appropriately recog- 
nized. Then came the professor him- 
self. 

But alas! By this time the new 
cadet had become so confused and 
nervous that he found his palms wet 
with the perspiration of anticipation 
and e.xcitement. Consequently he was 
horrified to find himself saying, 

"Good morning, Mr. ," to the 

most militan^ of instructors. Woeful 
day! He would surely fail the ex- 
amination. No man could possibly 
pass after such a blunder as that. But 
when grades ^vere later posted his 
whole class was surprised to find that 
he had passed the examination after 
all. In fact he passed the examina- 
tion with a 7.9, but what makes the 
story so sad is that he is still taking 
re-exams on the course. 



{Courlesy of the S,\l- Yorker) 



C. C. BOVA 
AND COMPANY 

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 
Dial 5576-5577 



WHOLESALE 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 



EQUIPPED WITH 

MOST MODERN BANANA STORAGE 
AVAILABLE 




FLOWERS FOR EVERY 


OCCASION 


FALLON 


FLORIST 


ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 


* 


Second Class Finance Committee 


Representatives 


GORDON WALKER 


JOHN COWART 



Pre-natal Influence 



ARTHUR SILVER 

AGENT FOR 

STETSON-D 

AND 

S&M 

CUSTOM TAILORED CLOTHES 



Tuxedoes and Full Dress 
a Speciality 

ROBERT E. LEE HOTEL BUILDING 



year 



Question; "Where will the World's Fair be held this 
9" 



Answer: "Around the waist, as usual." 



Old Lady (to Herb the dog man) : "What kind of a 
dog is that you've got there?" 

Herb: "I've got all the papers right Iiere in my pocket. 
He's a Spaniel, ma'am." 

Old Lady: "My, my! Isn't it a good thing he's not 
over there now." 



Cannibal Prince: "Am I late for dinner, father?" 
Cannibal King: "Yes, you are, son. Everyone's eaten.' 



"I'm a man of few words, Annabelle. Do you drink?' 
"No, but you talked me into it." 





/. PMl' 






Trade Warr 




UNIFORM INSIGNIA 




BUTTONS 




EQUIPMENT 


For ove 
insignia 
Corps, 


r 50 years we have been manufacturing military 
and equipment for the Army. Navy. Marine 
and other military services. 


During 
special 

military 


these years we have also been manufacturing 
devices, insignia, buttons, and equipment for 
schools and colleges. 


We sha 

special 


i be glad to assist in the creation of designs for 
nsignia and will furnish sketches on request. 




Write for Our Catalog 




N. S. MEYER 




INC. 


419 Four+h Ave. NEW YORK 1 





MANUFACTURERS 






OF 


■ 


SHIRTS 


AND PAJAMAS 




FOR 




OFFICERS 


AND MILITARY SCHOOLS 


JULIUS 


SIMON 

Established 1856 


CORP. 


261 Lorrimer Street 




Brooklyn, New York 



BROTHER RAT 

Here's some+hirig we wish to call to your atten- 
tion. While it may not be of much importance 
to you at the present time; nevertheless, it may 
be of inestimable value to you in later life. It 
is this: 

When you dress for that 
Gorgeous Lady 

First, have Heironimus dress you for the occa- 
sion. And then to your dream-girl you will be 
her Sir Galahad in elegance of attire, as well as 
in her heart. . . . Accessories, street and evening 
clothes. 



S H HEiRONimis 

Cam pbell-Heury-Kuh — .9 ErJrances. 

ROANOKE VIRGINIA 



FOR THE BETTER AUTOMOBILE 

PONTIAC 

RAPP MOTOR COMPANY 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



WESTERN 
AUTO ASSOCIATE STORE 

• TRUETONE RADIOS 

• SAFETY GRIP TIRES 
e WIZARD BATTERIES 

• SPORTING GOODS 

"The Complete Accessory Store" 

S. B. OGG, Owner " Lexington, Virgli 

I 13 Main Street 



To V . M. 1. Centennial 
Visitors!! 

A Southern Meal 

A Soutnern Bed 

Amiast Soutnern Surroundings 



Awaits Your Visit to 

THE DUTCH INN 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 

MRS. R. L OWEN 



WOODWARD & BOWLING 

ESSO STATION 

TIRES, TUBES, BATTERIES 
ACCESSORIES AND STORAGE 

Phone 451 

203 North Main St. Lexington, Virginia 



SITTERDiN6,GARNEAL, DAVIS CO., Inc. 

BUILDING OUTFITTERS 

From Foundation to Roof 

LUMBER, HIGH GRADE MILLWORK 
LIME, CEMENT, ETC. 

INSULATION, ASBESTOS, ROOFING, AND SIDING 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



E. P. MILLER President 

J. T. NOELL. JR Vice-President 

J. D. OWEN Vice-President 

J. L. JONES Cashier 

J. L. NICHOLAS Assistant Costlier 

L. V/. HORTON Assistant Castiic-r 

• 

THE 

FIRST 
NATIONAL BANK 

OF LYNCHBURG 

This Bank Is a Member of the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corporation 

CAPITAL 
ONE MILLION DOLLARS 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



BOB SMART SHOES 
FOR MEN 

"Always 'T Step Ahead" 

LOOK BETTER AtJD WEAR 
LONGER 



GEO. D. WITT SHOE CO. 



LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



My Gawd! I forgot 
My Breast Plate. 




SPEAKING OF PICTURES . . . 




I'M. I. is chiefly an engineering school. This picture shows 
the modern ccjuipment in one of the Civil Engineering 
laboratories. This apparatus is used for testing dead 
loads. "Ha\* hounds" is tiie name gi\-en to all cadets 
taking this course. 



rtn November il, iSjg, one of this coimtry'.s most outstanding military * 

schools was founded to afford protection for an arsenal that had been estab- 
lished a shori: tim? before on the banks of the picturesque Nile River, just 
outside of Lexington, Virginia. During the past century the V. M. I. has 
de\eloped to such an extent that it is often referred to as the "AVest Point 
of the South." Its graduates are recognized the world over for their thorough 
education and loyalty to that pile of rocks at the foot of House Mountain. 
We present here two pages of scenes of barracks life with the sincere prayer 
that it will decrease the number of suck-ins for the 1939-40 session. 



2+ 2 =4 



Calculus is the most popular subject taught at V. M. I. Cadet J. 

C.i. Bernard was a^varded a max for his \vork at the board shown 

above. 




Cadets are taught to keep their belongings in perfect order at all times. A 
third classman who had just returned from a hunting trip about 5:30 one Wed- 
nesday afternoon allowed the above picture to be taken of the table in his 
room. 



According to reports fr.an v. M. I. .ilumm, tlu Institute has lecently 

bcciime coeilucational. Here is a group of coeds sitting on the 

evening gun. 



LIFE AT 

VIRGINIA'S FAMED 

MILITARY INSTITUTE 

AT LEXINGTON 





Ceremonies are observed on Easter morning in which new cadets receive a 
number of good-natured blows from friends in the upper classes. This pic- 
ture shows one of the more popular new cadets being removed from barracks 
after a full dav of Easter activities. 



Rooms must be swept out each morning before Police Call at 7:50. 
A first classman got 10 demerits, 4 months confinement and 64 tours 
for putting this waste basket out on the stoop at the wrong time. 




This is a picture "i Cadet \V. .a. Irving's table taken during his third class year. 

Regarding his four years at V. M. I. Cadet Irving says, "1 always use my 

toothbrush and my Blitz cloth at least six times a day." 




The Piccadilly Brogue 
Brutally British — with an appeal that 
knows no price limit. The expertly treat- 
ed O-So-Ez-E innersoles and uppers of 
mellow brown Norwegian Calf built over 
a roomy last — combine to render the ut- 
most in walking comfort. 



We invite you to view many other 
exclusive models of 



/ SHOE 



TOLLEY'S TOGGERY 

III W. NELSON STREET » LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



THE 

STAUNTON. VA. 

EVENING LEADER 



NEWS LEADER 

Are the Dominant Papers in Central 

SHENANDOAH VALLEY 



"Now wait a minute, Mike. I like you a lot, but who 
said you could kiss me?" 

"Practically everybody on the West Side of the second 
stoop." 



"You say he lost his mind over a lack of business?" 
"He sure did. A lack and a lass." 



A girl from St. Catherine's was tearfully telling a First 
Classman about the infrequency of her week-ends off. 
"We only get one week-end and two half week-ends each 
semester," she said. The First Classman wanted to know 
what a half week-end was. 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

HIGGINS AND 
IRVINE 



LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



Compliments of 

N. B. HANDY COMPANY 

Lynchburg, Virginia 



"Why, a half week-end starts Friday night and ends 
Sunday night," she explained. 

"I see. Then just what do you call a full week-end?" 
"You silly. A full week-end starts Wednesday morn- 
ing and ends Tuesday night." 



The Green Knight rode into the hall where the court 
was feasting on his charger. 

— Rat Theme. 

Just like Crozet Flail, only we call it growley. 



Who was that lady I san- you outnit last night? 



TOLLEY'S 
HARDWARE CO, 



Phone 24 



SHOTGUNS, RIFLES 
AMMUNITION 



ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 
LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 




The Piccadilly Brogue 
Brutally British — with an appeal that 
knows no price limit. The expertly treat- 
ed O-So-Ez-E innersoles and uppers of 
mellow brown Norwegian Calf built over 
a roomy last — combine to render the ut- 
most in walking comfort. 



We invite you to view many other 
exclusive models of 



/ SHOE 



TOLLEY'S TOGGERY 



III W. NELSON STREET 



LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



THE 

STAUNTON. VA. 

EVENING LEADER 



and 



NEWS LEADER 

Are the Dominant Papers in Central 

SHENANDOAH VALLEY 



"Now wait a minute, Mike. I like you a lot, but who 
said you could kiss me?" 

"Practically everybody on the West Side of the second 
stoop." 



"You say he lost his mind over a lack of business?" 
"He sure did. A lack and a lass." 



A girl from St. Catherine's was tearfully telling a First 
Classman about the infrequency of her week-ends off. 
"We only get one week-end and two half week-ends each 
semester," she said. The First Classman wanted to know 
what a half week-end was. 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

HIGGINS AND 
IRVINE 



LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



Connpllments of 

N. B. HANDY COMPANY 

Lynchburg, Virginia 



"Why, a half week-end starts Friday night and ends 
Sunday night," she explained. 

"I see. Then just what do you call a full week-end?" 
"You silly. A full week-end starts Wednesday morn- 
ing and ends Tuesday night." 



The Green Knight rode into the hall where the court 
was feasting on his charger. 

— Rat Theme. 

Just like Crozet Hall, only we call it growley. 



Who was that lady I saw you outwit last night? 



TOLLEY'S 
HARDWARE CO, 



Phone 24 



SHOTGUNS, RIFLES 
AMMUNITION 



ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



Charlottesville Woolen Mills 



CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA 



I 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



HIGH-GRADE UNIFORM CLOTHS 

IN SKY AND DARK BLUE 

SHADES 



FOR 



ARMY, NAVY, AND OTHER UNIFORM PURPOSES AND THE 
LARGEST ASSORTMENT AND BEST QUALITY 



CADET GRAYS 



Including Those used ai fhe United States Military Academy at West Point, and 
Other Leading Military Schools of the Country 



Prescribed and Used by the Cadets of the 

VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE 



BROWN'S CLEANING 
WORKS 



Uniforms Collected Each Morning in the Guard 

Room; Returned Cleaned and Pressed In Time 

for D. R. C. 



PHONE 282 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 
Across the Street from Rocl-.bridge Motor Co. 

163-165 MAIN ST. 



Here's hoping we don't go 
on pledge this year. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

AUGUSTA FRUIT AND 
PRODUCE COMPANY 



STAUNTON, VIRGINIA 





"You Can't Take It With You" 



TOLLEY'S TOGGERY 

The College Man's Shop 

FEATURING 

HART, SCHAFFNER, & MARX 

CLOTHES 

ARROW SHIRTS AND TIES 

DOBBS HATS 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 



Custom Made Clothes Our Specialty 



I I I West Nelson Street 
LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



B. C. TOLLEY 



E. F. HAMILTON 



"BROTHER-RAT" 
DOLLS 



LET THEM MARCH 

INTO YOUR 

MOTHER'S OR SWEETHEART'S HEART 

TO THE SPIRIT 



Sold Exclusively by 

MILDRED MILLER'S 
GIFT SHOP 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 




The Horrors of Public Speaking 



Best Wishes 



from 

WILL OSBORNE 



and 



HIS ORCHESTRA 




Little Tin; "Of course you know what "two bars' 

mean, Mr. Cronin?" 

Cronin: "Yes, sir. It means you can get twice as 

drunic as you could at one bar, sir." 




oAn Excellent Tradition 



Just as the passing years have built for V. M. I. a fir^e 
tradition as the "West Point of the South," so they have 
brought to Hotel Roanote unique distinction as a 
"Modern Air Conditioned Version of an Old English 
Inn." When you are in Roanoke again, be sure to visit 
the new Hotel Roanoke where outstanding service, excel- 
lent accommodations, and delightful foods are pro.ided 
in the best tradition of the Old South. 

The Beautiful .\tn' 

HOTEL ROANOKE 

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 
Kenneth R. Hyde. Gen. Mgr. Geo. L Denison. Res. Mgr. 




WE SALUTE YOU 

V. M. L 

ON YOUR ONE HUNDREDTH 
ANNIVERSARY 

YOUR REPUTATION FOR DOING A 

GOOD JOB 

IS AN INSPIRATION 

TO US 



UNIVERSITY CLEANERS 



LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 





Compliments 
of 



ADAIR-HUTTON 



"Serving the Public for 
Over a Half Century" 



LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



B 



■fl 






';>■/ 






-o 






. W» BOXLEY & 
COMPANY 

RAILROAD CONTRACTORS 
Tunnel and Heavy Concrete Work 



PIONEER PRODUCERS OF CRUSHED STONE 

ALL MODERN METHODS 

QUARRIES LOCATED 

Pembroke, Va., Pounding Mill, Va., Blue Ridge, 
Va., on Norfolk & Western Railway 

Boxley, Va., on Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 



PRINCIPAL OFFICE— 711 BOXLEY BUILDING 
ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 



1. m, J. 

Deal ana Fraternity 
Jewelry 



BELTS AND SOUVENIRS 

Bamrtr k ^mtth 

JEWELERS 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 






V- 







-( 



mss& LymT, 



n 







(D ^t(DM 

/|liri(2ci 




aicires©ira 

eacfccr amc' 

c us 




WHO AM I? 

So they want some heat up in barracks! 

Heh! Heh! I'll let the boys freeze. 
I know it's down to zero outside, 

But I'll wait till it drops ten degrees. 



We were in the room alone. I watched her pour an- 
other drink and she leaned against the sink as she handed 
it to me. I knew I had already had too many, but I was 
unable to resist her beautiful smile as she said, "Just one 
more. It'll fix you up in no time." She knew why I was 
here. She knew what I wanted. She moved restlessly 
around the small room, while I sat there by the window 
watching her and anxiously waiting for her to speak. 
Finally she walked over to the mantelpiece, turned sud- 
denly and said, "All duty to 1 1 o'clock, ranks to S. R. C." 



A small group of men were working on a WPA project 
near the Institute last fall. One of them strxxJ up one 
day and called the foreman over to where he had just 

finished shoveling dirt into a hole. 

"I dug this hole where I was told to and when I had 
finished I put the dirt back into it like I was supposed 
to do. But all the dirt won't go back in. What'll I do 
about that?" he asked the foreman. TTie boss thought a 
long time, looking at the hole from all angles. He finally 
hit upon an idea and turning to the workman, he said, 
"Well, as I see it there isn't but one thing for you to do. 
You'll simply have to dig the hole deeper." 



Father: "Young fellow, if I catch you out with my 
daughter again I'll shoot you." 

Her Date: "That's O. K. with me. I'll sure desen.'e it." 



HOP FAVORS 

of Unique Designs 



FINALS GIFTS 

Watches, Chains, Lighters, Cigarette Cases 



HAND ENGRAVING 

Unsurpassed In the State 



BUCKINGHAM-FLIPPIN 



jewelers— Upliciam 



LYNCHBURG, 



VIRGINIA 



COMPLIMENTS 



SMOKELESS FUEL COMPANY 

CHARLESTON. W. VA. 



"Gold Standard" Coals 



NORFOLK 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 



CLEVELAND 



',mr^y^? 




"Hello, dear ... and Brother 'Rats 



THE 

V. M. I. POST EXCHANGE 

OPERATED FOR THE CORPS 
OF CADETS 



Principal Disbursements During the Past 
Fifteen Years 

Athletic Equipment $26,400.00 

Monogram sweaters and blankets for team members . . . 3,800.00 

Private wires for athletic contests 430.00 

Band at football games 4,759.00 

Rifle and pistol teams 4,644.00 

Fencing team 870.00 

Lounges in Cocke Hall 790.00 

Pianos 750.00 

Bleachers and chairs 1.740.00 

Tallcing motion picture machine 4,350.00 

Sound amplifying system 1,500.00 

Telephones 200.00 

Advertisements in cadet publications 1,808.00 



"ASK PETE--HE KNOWS" 



ADDRESSES OF THE CLASS OF 1939 

Adams, Fred W. T. C, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Andrew, George S., Jr., Northfield, Vermont. 

Arms, Ch.\rles C, 1223 N. Boulevard, Charlotte, N. C. 

B.ABCOCK, Ch.arles E., 140 St. Elmo Way, San Francisco, Calif. 

B.AILEV, J.^MES H., 532 8th Ave., Laurel, Miss. 

Baldwin, P. B., 906 North Oak, Little Rock, Ark. 

Barefield, M. D., Jr., HoUandale, Miss. 

Barnard, W. F., Jr., 3504 Atlantic Blvd., Va. Beach, Ya. 

Barnes, Baii.ev H., 3400 Altamont Rd., Binningham, Ala. 

Beale, Roger L, Jr., 200 S. High Street, Franklin, Va. 

Becker, Robert H., 4 Barnard Ave., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Bernard, J. G., 224 Filmore St., Petersburg, Va. 

BiCKFORD, Paul R., 121 Banks St., Hampton, Va. 

BiGLER, H-iVRMAN PAUL, Troutville, Va. 

Blackmon, Raymond C, Eufaula, Ala. 

BoLOTiN, Nathan, 213 Spruce Ave., Sharon, Pa. 

Bond, William A., 2731 Paradise St., Vernon, Texas 

Booker, Lewis, Jr., 2 E. 3rd St., New Castle, Del. 

Brand, William F., Jr., College Ave., Salem, Va. 

Brayshaw, Ilbert deL., Smithfield, Va. 

Brayton, Lee O., Jr., 1445 Troy Ave., Dyershurg, Tenn. 

Brittingham, Ray C, Jr., 453 Mallory Ave., Hampton, Va. 

Brownley, Claud P., HI, 1340 Graydon Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

Budd, George C, Richmond, Va. 

Burgess, Carter L., 1404 5th St., Roanoke, \'a. 

Carpenter, John M., 819 Jefferson St., Roanoke, Va. 

Carr, Douglas Willits, Norton, Va. 

Carter, Bernard P., Jr., 3202 Kensington Ave., Richmond, Va. 

Chase, Philip W., Jr., 5210 St. Albans Way, Baltimore, Md. 

Chiles, John W., 127 ist Ave., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Coleman, William W., 415 King George Ave., S. W., Roanoke, 
Va. 

Cooper, Leonard S., Long, Md. 

Cox, William H., 207 Bosley Ave., Suffolk, Va. 

Cracraft, William A., Jr., 1505 Lee St., Charleston, W. Va. 

Cronin, Henry J., 98 Market St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Crump, C. C, 2405 Terrett Ave., Alexandria, Va. 

Davis, Henry C, Willis Wharf, Va. 

Dicges, Dudley P., Rosendale Rd., Schnectady, N. Y. 

DiGGS, Harry C, Jr., 333 58th St., Newport News, Va. 

DiuGuiD, Frank S., Jr., 1104 Floyd St., Lynchburg, Va. 

Dorrier, John P., Scottsville, Va. 

DuNLAp, Jack Mck., Jr., Route 2, Lexington, Va. 

DuNTON, Harry C, Jr., Townsend, Va. 

Echols, William M., 109 Gilmerton Blvd., Craddock, Va. 
Edwards, Richard A., Jr., Church St., Smithfield, Va. 
Ellis, Arnold W., 406 Central Union Bldg., Columbia, S. C. 
Emerson, Fletcher B., 4901 Caroline St., Houston, Texas 
Ellerson, H. W., Jr., River Road, Richmond, Va. 

Fedde.man, Charles E., Jr., 717 Kerlin St., Chester, Pa. 

Ferrev, Russell H., Port Nelson, Ontario, Canada 

FosQUE, CiEORCE P., 329 Armistead Ave., Hampton, Va. 

Eraser, Ciril V., Jr., 1131 W. Grace St., Apt. 11, Richmond, Va. 

Frazier, Charles W., Jr., 1121 W. Grace St., Apt. 11. Richmond, 
Va. 




i 



Sold Throughout Virginia and North Carolina 
at Convenient 

PENDER 

FOOD STORES 



RIDABOCK & CO. 

1847 — Our Ninety-second Year — 1939 



THE MILITARY SPECIALTY HOUSE 

V. M. I. SASHES, CAPES, PLUMES, AND 

BELTS, ETC. 



MAKERS OF V. M. I. SHAKOS 



Custom Tailored Blue Dress Uniforms 
for the Army 



65-67 MADISON AVE. 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 



ADDRESSES OF THE CLASS OF 1939 

(JOM.ADAV, I low Aid) (),, Scnllvv illc, V'a. 

Gkavf-s, SlAM.iA II., ()r;iiinc-, \'a. 

Gray, Thomas W., 342 Fairfax Ave, Norfolk, V'a. 

Grui'in, I.. M., Jn., loS I'.. I.exiiiKton St., Haltiiiiorc, Md. 

IIaisi.ii', Wii.i.iam M., 209 Acacltiny St., Salem, V'a. 
Hai.i;v, Joski'II K., Jk., lilaiis, V'a. 

Hastings, V\'n,iJ.\M II., Jr., 701 W. ytli Avi-., Corsicaiia, 'i'exas 
HiGCiNS, John S., Jr., r.f.os Lee IliKlnvay, ]•'.. Falls Cluncli, V'a. 
HiI.I., Hai.skv, 600 Clreeinvo.ul Rcl., Roanoke, Va. 
HoBLiTZEi.L, Wai.tkr R., 486 F.lni Ave., Rali\va.\, N. J. 
Holland, Hilly S., 201 N. Raiulolph, St., l.exiiij;ton, V'a. 
HiPPEV, Fred A., 1026 Henry St., Roanoke, Va. 
HUDCINS, Louis E., 1038 Raleigli Ave., Norfolk, Va. 
Hughes, James S., Warrenton, V'a. 

Irby, Richard I.., R. F. D. i, Blackstone, \'a. 

Irving, William A., 21st and Chestnut St., Chester, Pa. 

Jacob, Herbert A., Jr., Lexington, Va. 

JARMAN, F. G., Jr., 402 FLamilton St., Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 
Jefferies, William L, 16 Glendale Ave., Alexandria, \'a. 
Johnson, John J., 1408 Washington Ave., Fredericksburg, Va. 
Johnson, J. P., Jr., 20 Rio \'ista Rd., Richmond, Va. 
Johnson, Walter K., 1659 S. Sycamore St., Petersburg, Va. 
Jones, Lawrence P., 2910 Glover Driveway, Washington, D. C. 

Kadick, Misha N., The Plains, Va. 

Kandel, Herbert J., 409 Granby St., Norfolk, Va. 

Kaufman, Edgar Joseph, Jr., 2826 Monument Ave., Richmond, Va. 

Kerr, Hugh A., Middleburg, \'a. 

Knight, O. B., 205 Fairmont Ave., Winchester, Va. 

Kovar, Vendel p.. Ford City, Pa. 

Little, C. Malcolm, 310 Roanoke St., Richmond, Va. 
Littrell, Jackson Sterling, 1659 Watt St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
Lord, Alan C, 1470 Dean St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
Love, John A., Jr., 9630 Ladue Rd., St. Louis, Mo. 

Magoffin, James S., Deerwood, Minn. 

Major, William L., 616 Prospect St., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Mathews, L.-vwrexce G., Huttig, Ark. 

Maxwell, Earle C, 1604 Pope Ave., Richmond, Va. 

McCarthy, William H., 1142 West Ave., Richmond, Va. 

McMann, W. S., 360 Townes St., Danville, Va. 

Meem, J. Lawrence, Jr., Front Royal, Va. 

Meem, Langhorn LL, 213 Union, Bluefield, W. Va. 

Middleton, William W., Jr., Mt. Jackson, Va. 

Mitchell, William C, Jr., 426 W. 29th St., Norfolk, Va. 

Morrison, Alexander H., 15 Amiss Ave., Luray, Va. 

Moseley, Thomas A. E., Jr., 450 Institute Hill, Lexington, Va. 

Moses, Earl C, Jr., 2818 Broadway, Great Bend, Kan. 

Nelson, Charles, Jr., Deer Park Circle, Nashville, Fenn. 
Newman, James B., II, 4324 S. Lookout Ave., Little Rock, Ark. 
Nix, Robert W., Ill, Melrose Farm, Waterford, Va. 

Parham, \'ai., Jr., 1607 Westover Ave., Petersburg, Va. 
Parker, Frank M., Chambersburg, Pa. 




"After the Ball Is Over 



THE ROCKBRIDGE 
COUNTY NEWS 

Will keep you Informed as to V. M. I. ana 
Lexington news after you leave the Institute 



$1.50 A YEAR IN 
ADVANCE 



Expert Job Printing at the County 
News Job Office 



PHONE 32 



ADDRESSES OF THE CLASS OF 1939 

Pasco, John, Jr., 1002 Cowper Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 
Peebles, John K., Hillcrest Ave., Nashville, Tenn. 

QuiKX, Wn.i.i.AM C;., \^'hitemar>h Rd., Merioii Golf Manor, Ard- 
more. Pa. 

R.\Gi..iN"D, Revben', Jr., Jacksonville, Fla. 
RiDoiCK, Willis, Jr., 131 Bank St., Suffolk, Va. 
RiDDLEBERGER, P.^TRICK W., 440 N. Main St., Woodstock, Va. 
Robertsos.% Arthur H., Jr., Chase City, Va. 
Rlbir.\, El.\dio, Spring Hill, Ala. 
RUFFIN-, E. H., Hopewell, Va. 

S.^M.iNS, W.ALTER A., 1 60S Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

S.ANTEE, Delbert K., Jr., Bethlehem R. D. No. 2, Bethlehem, Pa. 

S.AVAGE, Joseph L., Jr., 407 Amelia Street, Fredericksburg, Va. 

Saunders, 0. B., 809 15th St., S. E., Roanoke, Va. 

S.«E, Ira N., West Hurley, N. Y. 

Seaton", John E., Staunton, \'a. 

Slessman, Donald B., 413 Garrison St., Freemont, Ohio 

Slaughter, G. K., i 143 Bedford Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

Smithey, William R., Jr., 40 University Place, University, Va. 

Spurgin, Thomas W., Norfolk, A'a. 

Strickler, Richard D., 985 N. Frederick St., Hallston, Va. 

Seaton, John E., Staunton, Va. 

Stroop, Donald J., 422 Courtland Ave., Glenbrook, Conn. 

Sutherland, William A., TR-, 40S Alleghanv St., Clifton Forge, 

Va. 
SwANN, Larry T., 504 Linden St., Roanoke, Va. 

Tabb, J. Mackenzie, Jr., Middleburg, Va. 

Talman, John E., 100 W. Wickham St., Richmond, Va. 

Taylor, E. Ray, Ashland, Va. 

Thornton, Heber L., Fredericksburg, Va. 

TiCE, E. Jackson, 587 Arlington Rd., Roanoke, Va. 

TiDWELL, William A., Jr., 338 N. loth St., Noblesville, Ind. 

TiNSLEY, Preston F., Jr., 301 S. Boulevard, Richmond, Va. 

ToBEY, N. W., Hampton, N. H. 

Trzeciak, Andrew J., 930 7th St., Nc\v Kensington, Pa. 

Tucker, Robert J., Jr., 302 Lee St., Franklin, Va. 

Turner, A, Morris, Jr., 520 Greenwood Rd., Roanoke, Va. 

Van Hoose, Gordon W., Jr., 1104 Janther St., Shreveport, La. 
Verell, William B., 43 Pear St., Newport News, Va. 
Vivian, George Brent, Nitre, W. \'a. 

Wait, Norman C, Room i, Wait Block, Sturgis, Mich. 
Walker, Norveli. M., 420 Madison St., Lynchburg, Va. 
Wehri.e, Henry L., Jr., 854 Chester Rd., Charleston, W. Va. 
West, Oscar H., Jr., Prestwould Apts., Richmond, Va. 
Weston, George G., 833 West Beverley St., Staunton, Va. 
White, George M., 1136 Church St., Edenton, N. C. 
Wilkins, William E., H, 645 Tazewell Ave., Cape Charles, Va. 
WoLCOTT, William F., Jr., 10 Blackwood Rd., Asheville, N. C. 
Wood, John C, Jr., 145 Woodrow St., West Hartford, Conn. 
WooLF, James M., 1403 Webster St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Wright, Tyree L.^wson, South Boston, Va. 

Yee, Gawk Yow, 208 Market St., Johnstown, Pa. 
Witt, J. NL, 4324 Cliff Road, Birmingham, Ala. 
Messick, R. R.. 614 Woods Ave., Roanoke, Va. 
Knoules, Y. i!., Mt. Olive, Va. 



STONEWALL JACKSON 


HOTEL 


STAUNTON, VIRGINIA 




STONEWALL JACKSON TAVERN 


ON U. S. ROUTE .11 THREE MILES 


NORTH 


OF STAUNTON 




JOHN R. PAYNE, III, General M 


anager 




To Our Friends 
The Cadets! 

BEST WISHES 

from 

JOE FREEMAN 

and 

Manufacturing 
Department 



BEST LUCK 

from 

FRANK MORSE 

and 

REPAIR SHOP 



Serving Your Needs 
At the Q. M. D. 



P £ "j" E ' 5 'We Haul the Teams" 

PHONE TRUCKS 

711 



TAXIS 

Day and 
Night 



Radio and 
Heat 



WE CAR RY I N SU RANGE 



AMONG MANY OTHER 
ORGANIZATIONS 

V. M. I. CADETS 

ARE EQUIPPED WITH 

BOOTS 

BY 

COLT-CROMWELL 

STOUGHTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



ADDRESSES OF THE CLASS OF 1939 

Pasco, John", Jr., 1002 Cowper Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 
Peebles, John" K., Hillcrest Ave., Nashville, Tenn. 

QuiNN, WiLi.i.A.vi G., \\'hitemarsh Rd., Merion Golf Manor, Ard- 
more. Pa. 

R.ACL.ANi), Reuben", Jr., Jacksonville, Fla. 
RiDDiCK, Willis, Jr., 131 Bank St., Suffolk, Va. 
Riddleberger, P.\trick W., 440 N. Main St., Woodstock, ^'a. 
Robertson', Arthur H., Jr., Chase City, Va. 
RuBiR.A, El-^dio, Spring Hill, Ala. 
RuFFiN, E. H., Hopewell, Va. 

S.^M.ANS, W.ALTER A., 1608 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Santee, Delbert K., Jr., Bethlehem R. D. No. z, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Savage, Joseph L., Jr., 407 Amelia Street, Fredericksburg, Va. 

Saunders, O. B., 809 15th St., S. E., Roanoke, Va. 

Saxe, Ira N., West Hurley, N. V. 

Seaton, John E., Staunton, Va. 

Slessman, Donald B., 413 Garrison St., Freemont, Ohio 

Slaughter, G. K., 1143 Bedford Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

Smithev, William R., Jr., 40 University Place, University, \'a. 

Spurgin, Thomas W., Norfolk, Va. 

Strickler, Richard D., 985 N. Frederick St., Hallston, Va. 

Se.aton, John E., Staunton, \'a. 

Stroop, Donald J., 422 Courtland Ave., Glenbrook, Conn. 

Sutherland, William A., Ir., 408 Alleghanv St., Clifton Forge, 

Va. 
Swann, Larry T., 504 Linden St., Roanoke, Va. 

Tabb, J. Mackenzie, Jr., Middleburg, Va. 

Talman, John E., 100 W. Wickham St., Richmond, Va. 

Taylor, E. Ray, Ashland, \'a. 

Thornton, Heber L., Fredericksburg, Va. 

TiCE, E. Jackson, 5S7 Arlington Rd., Roanoke, Va. 

Tidwell, William A., Jr., 338 N. loth St., Noblesville, Ind. 

TiNSLEY, Preston F., Jr., 301 S. Boulevard, Richmond, Va. 

ToBEY, N. W., Hampton, N. H. 

TrzeciAK, Andrew J., 930 7th St., New Kensington, Pa. 

Tucker, Robert J., Jr., 302 Lee St., Franklin, Va. 

Turner, A. Morris, Jr., 520 Greenwood Rd., Roanoke, Va. 

Van Hoose, Gordon W., Jr., 1104 Janther St., Shreveport, La. 
Verell, William B., 43 Pear St., Newport News, Va. 
Vivian, George Brent, Nitre, W. Va. 
Wait, Norman C, Room i. Wait Block, Sturgis, Mich. 
Walker, Norvell M., 420 Madison St., Lynchburg, Va. 
Wehrle, Henry L., Jr., 854 Chester Rd., Charleston, W. Va. 
West, Oscar H., Jr., Prestwould Apts., Richmond, Va. 
Weston, George G., 833 West Beverley St., Staunton, Va. 
White, George M., 1136 Church St., Edenton, N. C. 
WiLKiNS, William E., II, 645 Tazewell Ave., Cape Charles, Va. 
WOLCOIT, William F., Jr., id Blackwood Rd., Asheville, N. C. 
Wood, John C, Jr., 145 Woodrow St., West Hartford, Conn. 
WooLF, James M., 1403 Webster St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Wright, Tvree Lavvson, South Boston, Va. 

Yee, Gawk Yow, 208 Market St., Johnstown, Pa. 
Witt, J. M., 4324 Cliff Road, Birmingham, Ala. 
Messick, R. R., 614 Woods Ave., Roanoke, Va. 
Knowles, Y. IL, Mt. Olive, Va. 



STONEWALL JACKSON HOTEL 

STAUNTON, VIRGINIA 

STONEWALL JACKSON TAVERN 

ON U. S. ROUTE. I I THREE MILES NORTH 
OF STAUNTON 

JOHN R. PAYNE, III, General Manager 




To Our Friends 
The Cadets! 



BEST WISHES 

from 

JOE FREEMAN 

and 

Manufacturing 
Department 



BEST LUCK 

from 

FRANK MORSE 

and 

REPAIR SHOP 



Serving Your Needs 
At the Q. M. D. 



P ^ "I" ^ ' 5 "We Haul the Teams' 

PHONE TRUCKS 

71! 



TAXIS 

Day and 
Night 



Radio and 
Heat 



WE CAR RY I N SU RANG E 



AMONG MANY OTHER 
ORGANIZATIONS 

V. M. I. CADETS 

ARE EQUIPPED WITH 

BOOTS 

BY 

COLT-CROMWELL 



STOUGHTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



i 



ROCKBRIDGE 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



PAUL M. PENICK, President 
S. M. DUNLAP, Vice-President 
JOHN L. CAMPBELL, Cashier 



This Bank Is a Member of 

THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE 
CORPORATION 



»- 



"Tell Me About Your Lynchburg Trip, Bill." 




ESTABLISHED OVER A CENTURY 

D. EVANS & CO. 

Incorporated 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

High Grade Gilt, Silver 

and 

Nickel Buttons 



29 Jay Street 
NORTH ATTLEBORO, MASS. 




DAILY LESSON IN GREEK PHILOSOPHY 

"Whom, then, do I call educated? First, those who 
control circumstances instead of being mastered by them; 
those who meet all occasions manfully and act in accord- 
ance with intelligent thinking; those who are honorable 
in all dealings, who treat good-naturedly persons and 
things that are disagreeable; and furthermore those who 
hold their pleasures under control and are not overcome 
by misfortune; finally, those who are not spoiled by suc- 
cess. But wait. I almost forgot those who get up at 
shake-a-leg and still get to BRC on time with both shoe- 
strings tied." 

— hocrates. 



WHO AM I? 

Have you ever hit a bull with a fiddle? 

I think it is lots of fun. 
You don't need Calculus to do it; 

You just gotta use your bun. 



Pre-vues of Coming Attractions 



MEET YOUR FRIENDS 

AT 

THE MAYFLOWER 
HOTEL 



ROOMS AND GOOD 

HOME-COOKED 

MEALS 



LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



SUNNY 


SIDE-THE KEYDETS' 


DAIRY 


Both Our Cows and Our Employees are Tested Regularly 
Safeguard the Health of Our Customers 


to 




Modern Equipment 






PASTEURIZED GRADE "A" MILK AND CREAM 
FROM A GUERNSEY HERD 




WE 1 N V 1 


TE INSPECTION AT ALL TIMES 




"The Situation Is Well in Hand, Sir." 



Centennial Visitors 
Welcome 



A Good Meal 



Well Prepared and Served 



VIRGINIA CAFE 

(Across from State Theater) 
LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



CALDWELL-SITES 
COMPANY 

BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS, 

AND GENERAL OFFICE 

OUTFITTERS 



SPORTING GOODS FOR 
EVERY SPORT 



WHOLESALE PAPER MERCHANTS 

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 
105 S. Jefferson St. 14 W. Salem Ave. 



TAKE ME FAR FROM WALLS OF GREY 

Speak, V. M. I., from your lifelesi heart of stone! 

Tell me why I returned year after year 

To these grey walls, this life that mauls. 

You knew that chained reversals would sear 

The ambitions of my life. Flesh and bone 

Are all that's left of me. You have taken all 

My desires, my aims, my family's hopes, 

Crushed them under your mass commands. 

Of initiative shorn, from progress torn. 

Am I left with nothing but my hands. 

I shall enter life as one who gropes. 

As unprepared, I try to sell myself to man. 

Four years have you shut me up inside 

The deadness of your barren, cruel existence. 

By suffering pained, unhappiness gained 

Through your meager moral subsistance. 

Four years have you made me hide 

My true self behind your uniform and brass. 

But, V. M. I., you shall not get my son, I swear! 

He shall lead a life of freedom and enjoy 

What God has given; shall not be driven 

To slavery in that system which takes a boy. 

Burdens him with worries, trouble, pain and care. 

Stabs ambition, preventing the realization of his 
dreams. 

— Disgusted 



Now, folks, don't get all worked up over the epic 
printed above. The guy doesn't really mean it at all. He 
had just been boned for selling in rat barracks three days 
after returning on Christmas furlough, so naturally he's 
prejudiced. — Editor. 



WHO AM I? 

The trout I serve in the mess hall 

Are reallv hard to beat. 
They are caught every Friday morning 

At the corners on Jefferson Street. 



''^ ^r^'ic^' 




Cadet Uniforms and Equipment, Expertly Tailored Suits 



Makers of 



ROLLER CAPES FOR THE FIRST CLASS 



SHENANDOAH TAILORING COMPANY 



MOUNT SIDNEY, VIRGINIA 



J. E. SHIPPLETT, Manager 



STAUNTON 
VIRGINIA 




LEXINGTON 

VIRGINIA 



College Annual 
Photography 



Completely Equipped to Render the Highest Quality 

Craftsmanship and an Expedited Service on 

Both Personal Portraiture and 

Photography for College 

ANNUALS 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE 
1939 BOMB 



"PAY ATTENTION TO WHAT YOU EAT 
BUT MORE TO WHERE YOU EAT IT" 

In Harrisonburg, Va., it's 

FRIDDLE'S 

NEW RESTAURANT 

"On the Square for Thirty Years" 

Famous for Courtesy, Fine Foods, Best 

Service. Under the Personal Supervision 

of M. Lyons 

SCHOOL HEADQUARTERS AND 
SPORTS CENTER 

"THE RESTAURANT THAT MADE 
HARRISONBURG FAMOUS" 



NOTES ON VIRGINIA DAY AND THE EASTER 
HOPS 

Herb Dillard became the barracks "Dr. Pepper," be- 
cause on Saturday night he took check-ups at 10, 2 and 4. 



Barracks was being inspected Saturday morning by the 
Board of Visitors and other distinguished guests. Two 
members of the Board were walking around the east side 
of the first stoop, stopping to enter Room 130. One of 
the two was Captain Bob, ever welcome in barracks where 
he is famous for his good humor. His companion turned 
to him and asked, "Captain, are these rooms warm in the 
winter?" 

"Sure," replied the Captain, pointing to the hayrolls. 
"Haven't you noticed the radiators?" 



Two third classmen were talking to a girl in front of 
Jackson Arch just before DRC. Said one, "We've gotta 
go to company now. Big toot's gone." 

She must have been beautiful, because she asked "Who 
is he?" 



The 1939 "Bomb 

Is Bound in a Kingskrdft Cover 
Produced by the - 

Kingsport Press 

Kingsport, Tennessee 



PHILADELPHIA UNIFORM COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

JOSEPH N. SUSSKIND AND COMPANY. INC. 

Manufacfurers of 

CAPS, MILITARY CLOTHING, AND EQUIPMENT 



CONSHOHOCKEN 



PENNSYLVANIA 






^r- 



•■^ '^^H'\::-p<"»y\ 







CADET MESSICK COMMANDING 



FRAZER PAINT COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Structural, Industrial and Decorative Paints 



Warehouse: Bedford, Virginia 



Detroit, Michigan 



CADETS! 



Don't forget to bring your parents and 

friends to The Southern Inn, where you 

can obtain better food and at reasonable 

prices. 



SOUTHERN INN 
RESTAURANT 



Main Street 



Lexington, Va. 



J. ED. DEAVER & 
SONS 

Schloss Bros, and Globe Clothes 
Made to Order 

BOSTONIAN AND NUNN-BUSH 
SHOES 

KNOX AND MALLORY 
HATS 

MANHATTAN SHIRTS 

PHONE 25 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



FOR V.M.I. R.O.T.C. CAMPERS 



Phone Alex. 1206 



PALACE CLEANERS 



Cleaning — Pressing 
Dyeing — Repairing 

Work Called For and Delivered 

W. H. SCOTT, Proprietor 
Prince and Royal S+s. ALEXANDRIA, VA. 



For the Best in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 
SUPPLIES 



BOLEY'S BOOK 
STORE 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



*^-B3«1..- 



MONTAC'S 

Fashionable Writing 
Papers 



SCHOOL STATIONERY 
SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



MONTAC BROS. 

Manufacturing Stationers 
ATLANTA, GA. 




COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

W. A. BURFORD 
& CO. 

Importers 

Tailor Trimmings 

• 

101 WEST BALTIMORE STREET 
BALTIMORE, MD. 




"That's no overcoat. It's 


a new blouse from the QMD." 


Continued Good Wishes to 




V RG NIA 


MLTARY NSTITUTE 

^ot 


American 


Co oid Corporation 



November 7 — Yates, F. S. "B" 
November 8 — Yates, F. S. "B" 
November 13 — Yates, F. S. "B" 

November 14 — Yates, F. S. "B" 

November 29 — Yates, F. S. "B" 



December 3 — Yates, F. S 
December 4 — Yates, F. S 



"B" 



"B" 



Dirty sink MI 

Dirty sink MI 

Stains in sink 
SMI 

Stains in sink 
MI 

Neglect of duty 
as room orderly 
by continually 
failing to re- 
move stains 
from sink. 

Stains in sink 
MI 

Grossly stained 
sink MI 

Dec. 5, 1938 



DR. F. S. Yates, VMI 

CR. LEXINGTON PLUMBING COMPANY 

Phone 96-J 

December 5 — Deluxe Standard Corner Sink . . ^20.75 

(Color-: Green uith red trhninings) 
(All hills iiiiist he paid uithin JO days) 



HEADQUARTERS 

VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 

December 9, 1938 
Special Order 

No. 46 

L For willful destruction of Institute property by 
breaking to pieces sink in his room and creating gross 
disorder in barracks during CCQ by attempting to in- 
stall a non-regulation one in its stead. Cadet Yates, F. S., 
First Class, will receive 10 demerits, be confined to bar- 
racks for a period of four (4) months and perform 64 
penalty tours. 

2. Cadet Yates is hereby released from arrest. 

By command of Major General Kilbun. 



G. A. DUBSHIRE 

Exeeiiiivc Officer 



OFFICIAL 

L. S. Griffins 
Cadet Captain Adjutant 



COMPLIMENTS 

FROM 
YOUR JEWELER 



R. L HESS & BRO. 

121 South Main Street 
LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



"PHILLIP'S BROS. Invites the 
Cadets to Lynchburg to visit the 
store of a thousand gifts, so they 
nnay say, if it comes from Phillip's 
Bros., it's just what I have always 
wanted." 



Phillip's Brothers Inc. 



906 Main Street 



LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



*^.- 



Centennial Visitors Welcome 


to 


RICE'S DRUG STORE 


Across From State Theatre 




SANDWICHES DRUGS 


CANDIES 


MAGAZINES 




For Delivery Call 41 




LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 





DEPENDABLE SERVICE SINCE 1911 

THE SOUTHERN BARBER 
AND BEAUTY SUPPLY CO. 

DIAL 9791 THE KOKEN LINE P. O. BOX 713 

Barber and Beauty Parlor Supplies 
and Equipment 

133 West Salem Avenue Roanoke, Va. 



Compliments of 

EZEKIEL & WEILMAN 
COMPANY 

lncorporot«d 

WHOLESALE 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

Restaurant and Kitchen Equipment 



THE 

LEXINGTON GAZETTE 

"Oldest Weekly Nev/spaper in the South" 

The Most Modern Printing Service in the Cz^". 

BICENTENNIAL ISSUE NOW SELLING 
ONLY ONE DOLLAR A COPY— GET YOURS 

NOW 

Phone 104 






'Mister, I didn't mean for you to take it literally when I said, 'At Ease'. ' 



tiiiWMtaK_. 



WHEN YOU REACH NORFOLK GO DIRECTLY TO THE 

ATLANTIC HOTEL 

GRANBY AT MAIN STREET 

Where You Will Receive Every Courtesy 

Best Accommodations a\ Reasonable Rates 

ROOM AND BATH NOW $2.50 

Room without Bath (Privilege Shower) $2.00 Rooms with Bath. $2.50 to $3.50 

J. FRANK BELL, Manager 

Most Modern Tubs and Showers Recently Installed 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

The Albemarle Paper Manufacturing Co. 



Incorporated 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



Makers of Kraft and Blotting Specialties 



Compliments 
o-f 



A. H. RICE CO, 

Makers of 

CUSTOM-MADE SEWING 
SILKS AND BRAIDS 



Mills at Plttsfield, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS 

ROBERTS & HACAN 

Incorporated 



Building Materials 



7 I I West 24th Street 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



ar attwum-^ * *■- 



THE 



PEOPLES NATIONAL 



BANK 



LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 




GREETINGS FROM 




I never saw a purple cow; 

I never hope to see one. 
But after drinking Mess Hal! milk, 

I know that there must be one. 



"How is old Ed these days?" 
"He's been a lot better since his operation." 
'Operation? I didn't even know he'd had one." 
"Haven't you heard about it? They removed a brass 
rail that's been pressing against his foot for years." 



A local clothing store was having a display in the Post 
Exchange. One of the cadets asked the representative 
how much a certain hat cost. "Just fifteen dollars," was 
the reply. The cadet looked at it for a minute or two 
then asked, "It's a nice looking hat alright, but where 
are the holes?" 

"What holes, sir?" said the clerk. 

"Why, the holes for the ears of the jackass who would 
pay that much for a hat like this." 



"AMERICA'S GREATEST SCENIC ATTRACTION" 



THE BEAUTIFUL 



CAVERNS of LURAY 



V. M. 



"THE WEST POINT OF THE SOUTH' 



AND AN INVITATION TO VISIT 

The Largest Cave in Virginia — The Most Beautiful Cave in the World" 

Near Skyline Drive and Shenandoah National Park 

LOCATED DIRECTLY ON LEE HIGHWAY, U. S. 211. WRITE FOR FREE BOOKLET 



BEST WISHES 
from 

HAL KEMP 

and his 

ORCHESTRA 




GOOD BEDS 
FOR TIRED HEADS 



ROBERT E. LEE HOTEL 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 
N. O'NEAL MOSES, Manager 



BROTHER RATS FOREVER 

To titc tune of "Shipmati's Fon'i't'r" 
Words by Frank J. McCarthy, Jr., '33 

Horsemen ride together, in the Cavalry; 

Legging next to leather, our smiles are gay. 

Our hearts are always free. 

Light as any feather, riding fearlessly; 

When our horses start to kicking. 

In the saddles we'll be sticking. 

In the Cavalry. 

Driver, watch those traces, cannoneer those brakes, 

Who cares what the pace is, those Field Artillery 

Boys have what it takes. 

Get your proper places, lay on aiming stakes; 

When the Field Artillery's firing. 

You had better be retiring. 

Hits are not mistakes. 
Doughboys march together, in the Infantry, 
Losing spirits never, but standing up 
For dear old Company "B." 
Fair or stormy weather, marching endlessly; 
Let the riders groom their horses. 
We will take our gains and losses 
In the Infantry. 

Brother Rats forever, stand by V. M. I. 

We will always cherish those grand old bonds 

That never, never die. 

When the fight is thickest, spirits soar on high; 

Years may pass and time go flying. 

But until the day you're dying 

Stand by V. M. I. 



BOYD'S TAXI 

SAFE, QUICK, COMFORTABLE 

RADIO AND HEATER EQUIPPED 

Phone 300 
LEXINGTON, VA. 



COMPLIMENTS 

of the 

LARGEST COLLEGE 
ENGRAVING COMPANY 

in the United States 



Si-^.^ 



L_ 




lly fulfilling the requirements of the 
liege Annual Staff we have combined 
sive and systematic servicing program 
h standard of quality so essential !n 
ion of fine yearbooks. Lynchburg 
inuals are built by an organization 
on school annuals exclusively, there- 
by assuring each staff of the personal and in- 
telligent assistance so necessary in the planning 
and designing of a truly satisfactory book. 

LYNCHBURG 
ENGRAVING 
■COMPANY- 

LYNCHBURG VIRGINIA 



C^ul£cku- af Cf^ttt^A. cAnmuih- 



W 




P m n T I n c c o m p a n y iv n a s h v i l l e 



:5 



o 

*^ 

« 

i 

01 




*V;r"if jcs 



L_ 




The End 



1^ 



^ f 




^^^ 



'\ \h i\^>'^r*^^'^'^^^-yrt:SS^^ 



nj*'-fi 



:N 



m^. 



M. .-t^^ 



v>> *:'>- * -* .-vr^' 



.pv 






._.--j-iri' 



^li2g^5^5^«<^^^ 






#=< >t 



■ \Zs:2A. 



w 



® 







'^rif^ 


















fc 



^ ■ 



'^ AKwf 






C^^ 
^^r 



:^: . ' ' 



/>,^^-^ 



5T', 






j^^? 



t ,. ^,v 



7^^'